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How to install a temperature sensor

Discussion in 'Sensors and Actuators' started by abuhafss, Sep 4, 2010.

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  1. abuhafss

    abuhafss

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    Aug 3, 2010
    Hi

    Can somebody guide me how can I install a temperature senor on a metallic body which be having temperature more than 200°C? Also what type of sensor would be suitable?
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    My first suggestion would be a thermocouple. You would probably be looking for one with an insulated body (not a bare junction). Just bolt it to the metal body to ensure good thermal contact.
     
  3. henzbelmont

    henzbelmont

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    Sep 5, 2010
    I need the same piece of advice. How do i install a heat sensor to a room with multiple heat sources that are pretty much regularly pushed to their max levels?
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    henzbelmont, in your case I would hang a thermometer on a suitable wall.
     
  5. henzbelmont

    henzbelmont

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    Sep 5, 2010
    Thanks Steve. Wonder why I hadnt thought of that
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 6, 2010
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Perhaps because you're a spammer?

    But thanks for baiting me, I may not have noticed it otherwise.
     
  7. abuhafss

    abuhafss

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    Aug 3, 2010
  8. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Did you check out thermocouples? Or do you want remote sensing of the temperature?

    You can get a thermocouple and a digital temperature display for maybe $US20 to $US30. And they're OK up to over 1000C (other than the insulation on the wires)
     
  9. abuhafss

    abuhafss

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    Aug 3, 2010
    You got the point, I need remote sensing.
     
  10. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Any other requirements I need to guess?
     
  11. abuhafss

    abuhafss

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    Aug 3, 2010
    The infrared sensor to be installed in the processing zone to monitor the temperature of removable hot metallic body. And the temperature reader/display to be installed on the control panel.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2010
  12. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Can you explain why you need an IR sensor? Why can't you just attach a thermocouple? It would be a lot easier.

    How far away is the control panel from the processing zone?

    If you use an IR sensor, how close to the actual heated object can it be? What is the ambient temperature here?
     
  13. trobbins

    trobbins

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    Jun 15, 2010
    Why do you need remote sensing?
     
  14. abuhafss

    abuhafss

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    Aug 3, 2010
    I think only a non-contact IR sensor can sense temperature of a removable body. In other words there would be different bodies.

    The processing zone is 12" - 18" away from the control panel.

    The sensor could be fixed at 2" - 6" away from the body.

    The ambient temperature = 25°C - 30°C.
     
  15. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Remote sensing adds a considerable degree of difficulty/cost factor unless you go a simple hand-held device.

    Surely the "removable body" has to be mounted on something or has some means of afixing a temperature probe?

    Here is one option for remote sensing of temperature. I always have a bad feeling when they ask you to "request a quote".
     
  16. abuhafss

    abuhafss

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    Aug 3, 2010
    Well, I had that idea. But, I wonder if a thermocouple fixed on the mounting of the hot body (instead of direct contact with the body) can give correct results. It is understood that the body and the mounting will have temperature difference.

    I have no idea about the K-type thermocouple, whether simple touching of the probe will give correct results. :confused:
     
  17. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Perhaps if you asked rather than going off in search of some other "magic" method.

    Have you wondered how accurate remote sensing of temperature is?

    Have you indicated the accuracy you require?

    Do you have a budget?

    Can you Google?

    edit: Can you describe the "metal body"?

    (why do people have to be so secretive and obfuscate their intent?)
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2010
  18. abuhafss

    abuhafss

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    Aug 3, 2010
    Frankly speaking, I never had a requirement of temperature monitoring. Therefore, my experience for remote or probe sensing is the same. I don't know how accurate both methods are.

    I think 1°C - 3°C accuracy should be OK.

    As far as the budget is concerned, I seek cheaper but reliable solution. Otherwise, I can go for RAYTEK or similar product.

    Metal bodies are aluminum profiles and process is brazing.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2010
  19. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Various thermocouples are rated for up to about 1400 C. You can buy a meter that they plug in to for around $US20, or you can roll your own solution.

    Attaching thermocouples to hot things is standard and well established practice.

    The thermocouple junction is very rugged. The parts that give you their temperature rating is usually and covering over the probe and the sheath the wires are in.
     
  20. abuhafss

    abuhafss

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    Aug 3, 2010
    By they way, just for my knowledge;

    a) how accurate is the remote sensing?
    b) what do you say about the accuracy of the results if I attach a thermocouple to the metallic clamp holding the aluminum profiles? To improve the results the material of the clamp can be changed, to aluminum or copper, if required.

    Thanks
     
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