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how to hold PCBs at right angles to each other?

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Michael, May 17, 2007.

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  1. Michael

    Michael Guest

    Hi - I am working on a board where I will have three PCBs at right
    angles to each other. Thus they'll have one common corner and three
    shared edges. These boards need to be exactly at right angles to each
    other, and they can't be allowed to move. Are there any premade
    solutions for holding boards at right angles to each other? Surely
    something like this exists?

    Thanks!

    -Michael
     
  2. linnix

    linnix Guest

    DIMM socket
     
  3. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Mount them in the corner of a box, with standoffs?

    Good Luck!
    Rich
     
  4. Donald

    Donald Guest

    Hot Melt glue ??
     
  5. D from BC

    D from BC Guest


    Row of wires out of one pcb soldered into the other

    D from BC
     
  6. DJ Delorie

    DJ Delorie Guest

    Put an exposed copper strip along each edge, and just solder the edges
    directly together.
     
  7. Michael

    Michael Guest

    Maybe I wasn't specific enough... They need to be at exactly 90
    degrees to each other. A degree error would be very significant...
     
  8. Michael

    Michael Guest


    This would work if I didn't have as stringent of accuracy
    requirements. They need to be at 90 degrees plus or minus a tenth of a
    degree or so. Initial production numbers will be fairly low (~100) so
    they will be hand assembled.
    ) soI wouldso
     
  9. Michael

    Michael Guest

    The boards are something along the lines of 3cmx3cm. Dimm sockets are
    too big I think.
     
  10. D from BC

    D from BC Guest

    Aluminum block with a slot in it..
    D from BC
     
  11. Donald

    Donald Guest

    I do not believe you will find and off the shelf solution with less the
    1 degree error on each side.

    Temperature will move any stand off or fastener beyond 1 degree true.

    Sounds like a Stainless steel frame with holes for the boards.
    Then the wiring can be anything you like.

    The sides won't move after that.

    Please send pictures of what ever you come up with.

    donald
     
  12. DJ Delorie

    DJ Delorie Guest

    So clamp them to a precision block before soldering.

    http://www.grizzly.com/products/g5642
     
  13. Jim Yanik

    Jim Yanik Guest

    Like this; _|_ or like this; |_| ?
    TEK used to use 1/4" aluminum blocks,drilled and tapped for 4-40 screws,one
    block at each corner.

    If you leave a strip or tabs of copper at the edges,you could solder the
    PCBs together.
    I've made boxes for detectors that way,using copper-clad epoxy-glass.
     
  14. Keystone makes threaded "L" brackets which could work. They look to be bent
    in a pressbrake though and will most likely not give the sub 1 degree
    accuracy you need. With that type of accuracy, you'll need a machined block.

    Chris
     
  15. JeffM

    JeffM Guest

    Have you priced 3-axis accelerometers
    rather than trying to build your own?
     
  16. whit3rd

    whit3rd Guest

    There are two-part connectors for mounting cards to a motherboard;
    DIN connectors like Nubus used (see DigiKey part # H1020-ND for
    example). Of course, to fix three right-angle-edges, will take
    a half dozen connectors. Figure $3 each...

    A welded or brazed steel frame might be easiest in the long run.
    You can fine-tune the angles easily, if your hammer skills are good.
     
  17. whit3rd

    whit3rd Guest

    There are two-part connectors for mounting cards to a motherboard;
    DIN connectors like Nubus used (see DigiKey part # H1020-ND for
    example). Of course, to fix three right-angle-edges, will take
    a half dozen connectors. Figure $3 each...

    A welded or brazed steel frame might be easiest in the long run.
    You can fine-tune the angles easily, if your hammer skills are good.
     

  18. Mill a groove (not through) in the PCB to be mated to that is a few
    mils over one PCB thickness wide. Place the copper strips along each side
    of the groove. Put copper on the edge of the mating PCB, and let the
    groove be what maintains the right angle. Solder the strips. VIOLA!

    As long as the PCB is rigid (use 90 mill PCB for the grooved one), you
    are set. You can break up the strips into segments so they do not all
    need to be soldered at once.

    My fee is 0.25% of your net. :-]
     

  19. 3 cm on a side is pretty small compared to those behemoths.

    The bear growls... Grrrr.
     
  20. MooseFET

    MooseFET Guest

    How about attaching them to the outside of a cube? You would have to
    keep all the components on one side to do it.

    You may want to consider increasing the number of PCBs to six. The
    unsupported corners are going to cause you trouble,
     
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