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How to build a variable frequency controler?

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by [email protected], Jul 4, 2005.

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  1. Guest

    I am looking for advice. I need a varable control device that can take
    standard 60 Hertz, 110 volts and give me a range from 15 Hertz to 200
    Hertz at 110 volts. This will be used to adjust the frequency of
    pulsating light given from a fluorescent light bulb. Some people find
    reading difficulty under fluorescent light. My theory is that this may
    be related to a sensitivity to the frequency. I have a basic knowledge
    of what needs to be done, but I am not sure what components I need to
    purchase and how to put them together. Any help will be appreciated!
     
  2. arem_29

    arem_29 Guest

    hi!.. i hope im not too late!...well, try to check this link,
    http://www.tpub.com/electronics.htm
    i think this might help you!...and i hope im right!...
    i hope that helps!... bye!..til next time!
     
  3. What you need is basically what a music amplifier does.
    It takes 110V and makes DC voltage which powers an amplifier which can
    drive a loudspeaker.

    Add a variable frequency generator and connect it to the input of the
    amp.

    If the output stage of the amp gives high enough voltage you can use it
    as your new, variable frequency power supply.

    I described this using an ordinary household item, an amplifier, to
    explain what needs to be done in simple terms.

    You may prefer to build an amplifier yourself, or buy one, but in any
    case you need a power stage in the amp which can deliver the voltage
    and current you need.

    The variable frequency generator isn't too difficult to build, there
    are schematics on the web.

    One alternative I would consider is to use an ordinary amp with an
    extra high voltage stage after it. Common amps for music seldom give
    enough voltage to make 110V AC.

    A transformer at the output of the amp is another possibility. If the
    amp delivers +-30Volt the transformer takes it up to 110.
    The size of this transformer and the power demands on the
    amplifier depends on how much current you need.

    By using a readymade amp I would save myself the most of the work,
    building the transformer stage, rectifier and amp circuits.

    Anyway, you you what you need now. A variable sinus wave oscillator, a
    power amp, and maybe a transformer if the power amp isn't
    specially made to produce high enough voltage by itself.

    An output voltage checking and regulating circuit can be added, if you
    need better regulation of the resulting AC output voltage than just
    setting it manually using a voltmeter.
     
  4. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

     
  5. Tom LeMense

    Tom LeMense Guest

    [snip]
    True enough - but typically if one sticks to frequenceis ABOVE the rating
    (in this case, 60 Hz) it's OK. Go below that, however, and the transformer
    will magnetically saturate and undoubtley fail due to overheating.

    TJL
     
  6. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

     
  7. Tom LeMense

    Tom LeMense Guest

    Hi John,

    No, I've not operated a ballast transformer above 60 Hz, but I *have*
    operated many 60Hz power transformers at higher frequencies, up to 400 Hz,
    without incident. It's a strong function of the primary inductance, which
    is sized for 60 Hz - once the frequency is higher, the transformer is less
    prone to saturation, so runs cooler. On the other hand, I've seen the
    disaterous results of what happens when a 60 Hz xformer is pressed into
    long-term service at 50 Hz, too...

    TJL


     
  8. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

    ---
    Yes, in order to maintain the same permitted flux density in a
    transformer operating at a frequency less than it was designed for,
    its input voltage must be lowered by the ratio of the frequencies:

    f1
    Vin2 = Vin1 ----
    f2

    so, for a transformer with a 240V 60Hz primary, the permissible input
    voltage at 50Hz would be:


    50Hz
    Vin2 = 240V ------ = 200V
    60Hz

    AIUI, a fluorescent ballast is more like an inductor than it is a
    power tranformer in that it has to generate a high voltage kick in
    order to ionize the gas in the tube and then, once the arc is
    established, supply a more-or-less constant current to the tube for
    the remainder of the half-cycle. Since the inductive reactance of the
    ballast is what limits the current through the lamp, and since
    inductive reactance varies with frequency, I would expect the lamp to
    dim if the input input frequency to the ballast was increased.

    http://home.howstuffworks.com/frame...l=http://www.misty.com/people/don/f-lamp.html
     
  9. Yes, but that can be compensated by adjusting the voltage, using the
    volume knob of the amplifier.

    This would allow some experimenting with different frequencies, which
    was the intent as I understood it.
     
  10. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

     
  11. Tom LeMense

    Tom LeMense Guest

    Yes, certainly as the frequency is increased the voltage will 'droop'. I'd
    attribute it to
    hysteresis effects in the core, especially with the frequency >> 60 Hz.

    If experiments didn't lead to more "pitfalls" they wouldn't be any fun,
    right? :)

    TJL
     
  12. Guest

    I think that inductive kick will blow up the audio amp. I had a friend
    try this many years ago with MY amp. Never DID get around to fing the
    old thing. What is wrong with using an electronic ballast? Or is this a
    'I gotta know what frequency...'. I guess I'm just an old fart. The
    solution is $25 at Lowes made by Osram.
    GG
     
  13. Guest

    I think that inductive kick will blow up the audio amp. I had a friend
    try this many years ago with MY amp. Never DID get around to fing the
    old thing. What is wrong with using an electronic ballast? Or is this a
    'I gotta know what frequency...'. I guess I'm just an old fart. The
    solution is $25 at Lowes made by Osram.
    GG
     
  14. Kubiack

    Kubiack Guest

    a écrit :


    If the only thing you want to experiment is the light frequency, you
    don't have to use a fluorescent light (witch is designed to operate at
    50/60Hz).
    You can build a very simple generator with a 0-5V 1Amp square output and
    drive a series of white leds to illuminate what you want to illuminate.


    On this other hand, if you really want to build a sine generator with a
    110V output, you have a lot of work.
    Such generators already exists and are used to drive asynchronous motors.
     
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