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How many hours of peak sunlight?

Discussion in 'Photovoltaics' started by Robert Morein, Jul 10, 2004.

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  1. (Or just sunlight).

    Since a panel can be oriented toward the sun, it would appear that the
    primary limit to the number of peak hours is atmospheric absorption.

    Are there accepted figures based upon the altitude of the sun above the
    horizon?
     
  2. H. E. Taylor

    H. E. Taylor Guest

    You may find the PV FAQ of some use, specifically Question 5.
    5) How much sunlight do I get at my location?
    http://www.autobahn.mb.ca/~het/energy/pv_faq.html#Q05

    <fwiw>
    -het



    --
    "It is difficult to say what is impossible, for the dream of yesterday
    is the hope of today and reality of tomorrow." - Robert Goddard

    Energy Alternatives: http://www.autobahn.mb.ca/~het/energy/energy.html
    H.E. Taylor http://www.autobahn.mb.ca/~het/
     
  3. Starbase

    Starbase Guest

    This is a common topic among astronomers and is clearly demonstrated when
    monitoring the apparent brightness of a star as it rises or sets, the star
    will increase by several magnitudes from a point low on the horizon to its
    maximum altitude. As well as the density of the "air" through which the
    light must travel there are also other factors such as dust, pollution, and
    water vapour which will make a big difference on any given day. perhaps a
    question in an astronomy <ng> or googling "atmopheric absorption" will lead
    to basic figures. Another thing to consider is that the different
    wavelengths of light will be scattered/absorbed at different rates, (which
    is why a low sun looks red and the sky looks blue), which might also be a
    factor to consider along with the peak wavelength at which the panel works
    at.


    Regards

    Chris
     
  4. Steve Spence

    Steve Spence Guest

    Look at an insolation chart. Gives average sun hours by season for the whole
    country.
     
  5. Thank you all, the insolation chart did answer the question.
    These charts are great, because they also include atmospheric transmissivity
    at the location.
    It appears that Portland, ME has more insolation than Philadelphia, for this
    reason.
     
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