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How is IOT different from Embedded Systems?

Discussion in 'Microcontrollers, Programming and IoT' started by Paul Saha, Aug 26, 2016.

  1. Paul Saha

    Paul Saha

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    Jul 7, 2016
    I have heard that embedded system is the subset of IOT? But how? Is the embedded system integrated with Wifi module called IOT? Then why do we call IOT, we can call it automation instead!
     
  2. BobK

    BobK

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    It's all about the buzzwords.

    Bob
     
    Paul Saha likes this.
  3. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    IoT, or Internet of Things, is a networking concept where two or more (often a LOT more) devices all communicate with each other. A WiFi module may or may not be included in the mix, depending on how those individual devices connect to the Internet. In any case, some sort of embedded system is required in each device to moderate, monitor, send and receive network communications traffic. So, yeah, an embedded system is used with each IoT device. And if the device uses a WiFi connection to the Internet, the embedded system controls that too, along with everything else the device does. You can call it automation if you want to, but IoT is sooo much more than just simple automation, which doesn't require ANY Internet connection to do its thing.

    Making "smart" devices that you can communicate with from anywhere in the world is a global game changer. Hackers love this, infecting Internet-connected computers with malware to create bot-nets for all sorts of nefarious purposes. It's a growing business, designing IoT devices with secure interfaces to the Internet. Gotta stay at least two steps ahead of the hackers and be on the look-out for vulnerabilities in the hardware and the programs that drive it. Get very good at it (hacking or defending) and you can earn big bux.
     
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  4. Doug3004

    Doug3004

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    In my opinion, the concept of "Internet of things" implies that there is a remote service provided by the device that you specifically don't have to do yourself. Somebody else (some company) does it for you. And it costs you some money.

    One easy example is the Amazon Dash buttons: when you press a dash button, it tells Amazon to send you another [product], for whatever product it is set for. You could make your own Dash-style button that would just send a text to your phone to remind you that you were out of that item, or that could update your online shopping list (if you had one online somewhere) but you'd still have to go and BUY the [whatever] yourself.

    You can build remote-control devices and you can have a web interface on them but that is still a feature you only use on your own. The hype behind IOT stuff now is because companies are tying their services into these things, to do things for you (that they can charge you money for).
     
    Paul Saha likes this.
  5. NorthGuy

    NorthGuy

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    I think they try to charge money for things which used to be free.

    Look at the clouds. 10 years ago you could buy a computer and software and use both at will. Now they try to move the software to clouds, so you can do the same (only with network overhead), but you must pay cloud fees and software rentals. Now software is a "service". To enforce the idea, the software is build in such a way that the hardware is now under control of the software provider rather than the owner. Google has more rights on the Android phone than the owner of the phone. Microsoft has more control over Windows 10 computer than the owner.

    Similarly, they want to extend the control over physical things with IoT. Thus, providing a coffee maker shall become a service which you would have to pay for on a regular basis. You will not own things any more, but you will rent them.
     
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  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    For me, IOT simply means that the thing is a non-traditional device connected to the internet. "non-traditional" often means it's a microcontroller based thing rather than a general purpose computer (and I include phones in the general purpose computer category).
     
    Paul Saha likes this.
  7. petercuenca

    petercuenca

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    without internet, its not.
    an embedded system, even without WIFI, can still be called automation.


    The internet of things (IoT) is the network of physical devices, vehicles, buildings and other items—embedded with electronics, software,sensors, actuators, and network connectivity (Internet Access) that enable these objects to collect and exchange data. -Wikipedia.

    take away Network Connectivity (Internet Access), and you cant call it IoT anymore.
     
    Paul Saha likes this.
  8. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    I would argue that network access is sufficient since the difference between that and internet access is simply a security issue. The device itself may not know or care.

    What if the device has no internet access by itself, but communicates with something that does? Does it have to use IP, or could it use some other type of communication protocol?

    To me, IOT is a bit fuzzy.
     
  9. Doug3004

    Doug3004

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    Sep 5, 2014
    What they originally said was that it would be devices that had their own (unique) IP address.... but a lot of what's coming out now doesn't really do that tho--the Amazon Dash buttons for example.

    They are hard-coded to access a specific IP address online, but whatever address they do that from doesn't really matter. And as far as I've read of them, there is no real two-way communication that really happens (the Amazon server sending any info back to the button?)--tho I don't have any of the things myself.

    Also we've already seen a few stories of the security issues involved. The one about Samsung smart TVs are the first story I saw, tho there may be others by now.
     
    Paul Saha likes this.
  10. Paul Saha

    Paul Saha

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    Jul 7, 2016
    So what are the ways to compete with Hacking and making peoples life more easier?
     
  11. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    How do you "compete with hacking?"

    Does your usage of the word "with" most closely correspond to "using", "against", our something else?
     
  12. Paul Saha

    Paul Saha

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    Jul 7, 2016
    Yeah exactly!
     
  13. BobK

    BobK

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    "Yes, exactly" is not an acceptable answer to a question giving you three options.

    Bob
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2016
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