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How expensive would it be to add a Cat 5 port to TVs and VCRs

Discussion in 'Electrical Engineering' started by metspitzer, Aug 7, 2008.

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  1. metspitzer

    metspitzer Guest

    What kind of cost would it be to put your TV or VCR on your LAN?

    It would be cool to be able to program my VCR from my computer.

    It would also be nice to send a movie from my computer to my TV.
     
  2. metspitzer

    metspitzer Guest

    After re reading this, I should add....How much would the technology
    add to the cost of the TV/VCR? I know the current electronics will
    not do this.
     
  3. Guest

    | What kind of cost would it be to put your TV or VCR on your LAN?

    Adding the port ... a few cents.

    Hooking the port into the electronics ... a few more cents.

    Making the electronics inside the set actually understand how to communicate
    with other devices on the LAN ... priceless.


    | It would be cool to be able to program my VCR from my computer.

    What? You want a usable human interface?


    | It would also be nice to send a movie from my computer to my TV.

    DVI to HDMI already exists. Of course you do have to get the computer close
    to the TV to do this.
     
  4. Palindrome

    Palindrome Guest

    I wouldn't call 80 feet (or more), "close"...

    http://www.datapro.net/products/dvi-inline-repeater-booster.html
     
  5. Blarp

    Blarp Guest

    Took me some time to unboggle my mind.

    If a computer is in the house - why a ancient piece of technology like
    a VCR needs to be in the loop somewhere?

    I hook up my cheapish laptop to the TV (s-vhs), and play alle the
    movies, doc's etc I like. I do not bother recording something,
    torrents / streaming etc is much easier - and no commercials :)

    On another TV in my house I use an old-skool Xbox running multi media
    SW - which also does it all. Works for music too (thousands of
    streaming channels, rock to classic)

    recording is soo 2007!

    ...VCR!... [resume boggle mode] :)
     
  6. metspitzer

    metspitzer Guest

  7. metspitzer

    metspitzer Guest

    Ok, a DVD Recorder then.
    TV and VCR were easier to type.
     
  8. metspitzer

    metspitzer Guest

    You would think a set of dip switches to set the IP address would
    work.

    I would think 192.168.1.1(1-8) would be a good range. You wouldn't
    have to know what the numbers meant. Just make sure they are
    different for each device.

    I use 192.168.1.1(1-9)0 for my computers.
     
  9. metspitzer

    metspitzer Guest

    I can't do that. I have to open ports on my router for P2P software.

    Turning the computers on in the wrong order changes the IP addresses.
     
  10. Guest

    |>
    |> | What kind of cost would it be to put your TV or VCR on your LAN?
    |>
    |> Adding the port ... a few cents.
    |>
    |> Hooking the port into the electronics ... a few more cents.
    |>
    |> Making the electronics inside the set actually understand how to communicate
    |> with other devices on the LAN ... priceless.
    |>
    |>
    |> | It would be cool to be able to program my VCR from my computer.
    |>
    |> What? You want a usable human interface?
    |>
    |>
    |> | It would also be nice to send a movie from my computer to my TV.
    |>
    |> DVI to HDMI already exists. Of course you do have to get the computer close
    |> to the TV to do this.
    |>
    | I wouldn't call 80 feet (or more), "close"...
    |
    | http://www.datapro.net/products/dvi-inline-repeater-booster.html

    It's still not practical wire up a new house with HDMI everywhere, but it is
    practical to do that with CAT6.
     
  11. Many DHCP servers will allow you to permanently assign an IP
    address to a given computer. Even dynamic addresses from a pool
    are sometimes allocated in a sticky way -- i.e. you get the same
    one you had last time unless it has been given to someone else.
    That needs some non-volatile storage if it's to work across
    power cycles though, and is not likely to be found in a simple
    DHCP implementation in a tiny router.
     

  12. This thread's topic is silly.

    There is no need to hook up old gear like that to a network. They do
    not even have processors, and controlling chips they do have are limited
    to the tasks they already perform, so an additional PWB would have to be
    added to even create a controlling element to such a piece of gear.

    One would be much better off wiring up a universal remote such that a
    computer could control it. Still extra work when simply using the
    uni-remote by hand would be a direct interface.
     
  13. metspitzer

    metspitzer Guest

    So you are saying electronics aren't capable of translating 1s and 0s?

    Silly?

    I think you are a little short sighted.

    The technology is very possible. I am just not sure how costly it
    would be. That is why I asked the question.

    You seem to be saying it couldn't happen.
     
  14. Quite silly.

    I think you are a lot short sighted.
    I never said it wasn't dipshit. Learn to read. Then learn how to
    comprehend what you read correctly. You remark, is however, quite
    indicative of how little you know about networking, and the TCP/IP stack,
    in particular.

    No shit, Dip Tracy. Which is why I said wiring a universal remote,
    which already has the capacity to control all of those items, would be
    far easier.


    It is obvious why you asked the question. It is because you are about
    as green as it gets, and your reading skill are likely why you do not
    already know why it is not feasible, and remain green.
    I never said that. You seem to think it is some cake little radio
    shack hobby kit.

    First off, it is overkill. Since a TV only has a very, very short list
    of functions that can or would need to be controlled. A VCR has even
    fewer, considering that all would be done via existing internal menus.

    You would be better off making a blue tooth to IR remote device that
    you program to control a device, that you access via BT wireless.

    Or is that too goddamned deep for you to figure out as well?

    There... asshole. I just gave you an idea for a multi-million dollar
    device, considering that there are millions of idiots just like you, that
    want to cling to old gear, yet control it with the new gear.

    When you make the product, I'll take 3% commission.
     

  15. Only because there is no such thing as an "HDMI Splitter/Combiner" or an
    "HDMI Distribution Amplifier" on the consumer market... much less
    repeaters. There are some 1 in 4 out POS items out there, but I have
    seen a lot of bad items as well. Many add "snow" and other artifacts to
    what we thought was an error free image standard.

    When one does arrive, it will likely be some cheap Chinese crap that
    has stepped outside the boundaries that keep US and legit makers from
    producing such an item. Buyer beware.
     
  16. Guest

    | On 8 Aug 2008 03:01:21 GMT, wrote:
    |
    |>
    |>|>
    |>|> | What kind of cost would it be to put your TV or VCR on your LAN?
    |>|>
    |>|> Adding the port ... a few cents.
    |>|>
    |>|> Hooking the port into the electronics ... a few more cents.
    |>|>
    |>|> Making the electronics inside the set actually understand how to communicate
    |>|> with other devices on the LAN ... priceless.
    |>|>
    |>|>
    |>|> | It would be cool to be able to program my VCR from my computer.
    |>|>
    |>|> What? You want a usable human interface?
    |>|>
    |>|>
    |>|> | It would also be nice to send a movie from my computer to my TV.
    |>|>
    |>|> DVI to HDMI already exists. Of course you do have to get the computer close
    |>|> to the TV to do this.
    |>|>
    |>| I wouldn't call 80 feet (or more), "close"...
    |>|
    |>| http://www.datapro.net/products/dvi-inline-repeater-booster.html
    |>
    |>It's still not practical wire up a new house with HDMI everywhere, but it is
    |>practical to do that with CAT6.
    |
    |
    | Only because there is no such thing as an "HDMI Splitter/Combiner" or an
    | "HDMI Distribution Amplifier" on the consumer market... much less
    | repeaters. There are some 1 in 4 out POS items out there, but I have
    | seen a lot of bad items as well. Many add "snow" and other artifacts to
    | what we thought was an error free image standard.

    If find one that can add snow to HDCP protected video, let me know.


    | When one does arrive, it will likely be some cheap Chinese crap that
    | has stepped outside the boundaries that keep US and legit makers from
    | producing such an item. Buyer beware.

    Including HDCP cracking.
     
  17. Guest

    | On Thu, 07 Aug 2008 13:16:43 -0700, "Paul Hovnanian P.E."
    |
    |>metspitzer wrote:
    |>>
    |>> On 7 Aug 2008 06:07:08 GMT, wrote:
    |>>
    |>> >
    |>> >Making the electronics inside the set actually understand how to communicate
    |>> >with other devices on the LAN ... priceless.
    |>> >
    |>> You would think a set of dip switches to set the IP address would
    |>> work.
    |>>
    |>> I would think 192.168.1.1(1-8) would be a good range. You wouldn't
    |>> have to know what the numbers meant. Just make sure they are
    |>> different for each device.
    |>>
    |>> I use 192.168.1.1(1-9)0 for my computers.
    |>
    |>Practically all of the commercial and free TCP/IP software stacks will
    |>include a DHCP client. Just plug it in and your hub will assign it an
    |>address.
    |
    | I can't do that. I have to open ports on my router for P2P software.
    |
    | Turning the computers on in the wrong order changes the IP addresses.

    I use static IP addresses configured in to all my computers. Even Windows
    can do that. I booted up a Ubuntu live CD that doesn't use the hard drive
    as a means to test that DHCP on my router was OK. My DCHP is configured
    with 64 available addresses for "guests".
     

  18. The very first one I bought. one in, three out. The screens carry
    artifacts when I use it that do not appear direct linked, or when I use
    the new unit I have.

    HD DVD and Blu Ray devices reveal a lot as they put out about the purest
    HDMI fed HI Def picture available at this time. Piping their signal
    through that switch is the saddest excuse for an electronic product I
    have ever seen. It's a damned shame that we cannot sue folks like that,
    as was once possible.
     
  19. Guest

    | On 8 Aug 2008 18:36:56 GMT, wrote:
    |
    |>
    |>If find one that can add snow to HDCP protected video, let me know.
    |
    |
    | The very first one I bought. one in, three out. The screens carry
    | artifacts when I use it that do not appear direct linked, or when I use
    | the new unit I have.
    |
    | HD DVD and Blu Ray devices reveal a lot as they put out about the purest
    | HDMI fed HI Def picture available at this time. Piping their signal
    | through that switch is the saddest excuse for an electronic product I
    | have ever seen. It's a damned shame that we cannot sue folks like that,
    | as was once possible.

    Sue the retailer you bought the piece of Chinese crap from.
     

  20. Fry's Electronics. They would settle for court costs, the loss I
    suffered on the item, plus a small inconvenience "fee".

    Or fight it, and end up with the same result. It is likely a poorly
    shielded layout or the like, or the supply feeding it is sad.

    Bad design either way. It shouldn't require a suit though. These
    stores should know what they are selling, and be responsible for it when
    it sucks. Being required to bring the courts into it is an unneeded
    waste. There should be a law about guarantees and warranties.


    Speaking of stupid behavior, the Wall-e game demo for the PS3 is set to
    about 20dB higher audio volume level than the XMB interface or any other
    title made for the PS3, so it damn near blows your speakers out when the
    intro comes up. I contacted Disney, and they pointed me to the game
    author's site. No reply yet to the email I sent them, referring to the
    guy that set that volume level as being about as incompetent a programmer
    as it gets. Still waiting for the reply. They are damned lucky my
    speakers are high quality and took the transient.
     
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