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How Does an Electric Dipole Generator Work?

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by W. Watson, Jan 3, 2005.

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  1. W. Watson

    W. Watson Guest

    Look at my very old physics book, I came across a description on EM that uses the
    idea of an electric dipole generator. Effectively an antenna. It almost appears as
    though one could stick a power cord in an electric outlet without anything attached
    to it (bulb, for example), and have an antenna. What's happening here? Does current
    flow up one wire and then back down it into the other wire. Sounds a bit puzzling. I
    would take there is really no dipole in the sense that there's a +/-pair. Can someone
    elucidate on what's happening?
    --
    Wayne T. Watson (Watson Adventures, Prop., Nevada City, CA)
    (121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N) GMT-8 hr std. time)
    Obz Site: 39° 15' 7" N, 121° 2' 32" W, 2700 feet

    Web Page: <home.earthlink.net/~mtnviews>
     
  2. Jamie

    Jamie Guest

    yes, more or less.
    hense the reason for corrected
    length of an antenna elliment.
    it flows down the surface of the
    elliments and then returns.
    the idea is to match it properly
    so that incoming energy and returning
    energy timed correctly to give the
    proper loading effects(EMF generations);
    etc..
    i have a nice PDF guide that covers
    antenna theory and i think it covers
    your topic very well if you wish to
    have it.
     
  3. Miles Harris

    Miles Harris Guest

    It would have to be an exceedingly ***long*** dipole to efficiently
    radiate 60Hz. But such low frequencies *do* propagate through space if
    given the chance. They're just not normally used, due to the
    exceptionally long wavelength!
     
  4. Oh dear...This last sentance is like one one those "experts" on tv shows
    telling us black is black because it is black.

    A more usfull statment would be:

    Low frequencies are not normally used because it is difficult to
    transfer power to the antenna. This results in low transmissinon
    distances.

    or

    Low frequencies are not normally used because the data rate that can be
    transient is low.

    Kevin Aylward

    http://www.anasoft.co.uk
    SuperSpice, a very affordable Mixed-Mode
    Windows Simulator with Schematic Capture,
    Waveform Display, FFT's and Filter Design.
     
  5. W. Watson

    W. Watson Guest

    I forgot to mention that my house is wired for 120v and 6MHz. :)

    --
    Wayne T. Watson (Watson Adventures, Prop., Nevada City, CA)
    (121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N) GMT-8 hr std. time)
    Obz Site: 39° 15' 7" N, 121° 2' 32" W, 2700 feet

    Web Page: <home.earthlink.net/~mtnviews>
     
  6. W. Watson

    W. Watson Guest

    Sure. Is it something on the web?

    --
    Wayne T. Watson (Watson Adventures, Prop., Nevada City, CA)
    (121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N) GMT-8 hr std. time)
    Obz Site: 39° 15' 7" N, 121° 2' 32" W, 2700 feet

    Web Page: <home.earthlink.net/~mtnviews>
     
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