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How do you drill through stainless steel at home?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Danny D., Mar 7, 2013.

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  1. amdx

    amdx Guest

    He's attempting to REPAIR a hole the grew back.
    Mikek :)
     
  2. Baron

    Baron Guest

    Jeff Liebermann Inscribed thus:
    Now now... He definitely doesn't want to do that :-(
     
  3. Jim Wilkins

    Jim Wilkins Guest

    He did assume that titanium coating implied quality.
     
  4. amdx

    amdx Guest


    Speaking about my wife.. I'm thinking about getting a new car for her.
    Do you think it's a good trade?
    Mikek
     
  5. amdx

    amdx Guest

    On the internet?
     
  6. jon_banquer

    jon_banquer Guest


    You have it right, Jim.

    George Plimpton, Delvin Benet (and the many other names he posts
    under) has no clue how to machine anything. In addition, he has no
    real world practical knowledge of metalworking.
     
  7. Maybe mapp gas with oxygen might be hot enough to punch a hole in
    stainless steel.
     
  8. Well look, Delvin. Suffice it to say that there's alt.humor and
    rec.humor, if that'll help.
     
  9. Little jimmie does it everywhere.
     
  10. He has it wrong, little jonny banqueer. I choose not to do very much on
    my car because I don't enjoy it, and because cars have gotten much more
    complex than they once were, and because I don't have the expensive
    specialized tools now required.

    He and you get everything wrong, little jonny banqueer.
     
  11. ....you can do.

    We weren't actually speaking of you.

    I have no reason to drill stainless steel. I choose not to do much on
    my car because I don't enjoy it, I can afford to pay to have it done,
    and there are more valuable uses of my time.

    You don't do anything of value because you can't do anything of value.
     
  12. jon_banquer

    jon_banquer Guest

    It won't help. Suggest you review posts from George Plimpton / Delvin
    Benet, etc so you can see that you're not dealing with someone who has
    any metalworking skills or any real practical metalworking knowledge.
     
  13. There is even a YouTube about it. ^_^



    TDD
     
  14. You already said that, little jimmy, and I shot it down. I know you are
    stuck, but see if you can try something new.
     
  15. I had a thought that if you're wanting to attach a chain to it and it
    has a hollow handle, you could use an expanding concrete anchor and
    a bolt with Loctite 262 to keep the bolt/screw from coming out. ^_^

    TDD
     
  16. jon_banquer

    jon_banquer Guest

    Consider that George Plimpton / Delvin Benet / whatever name he posts
    under (most from Giganews) simply aren't worth anymore of your time,
    Jim.
     
  17. Consider that you, little jonny banqueer, are a fraud. You don't know
    CAD/CAM software, you don't know machining, you don't know anything
    useful. You're just an asshole with an arrest for domestic violence,
    little jonny banqueer.
     
  18. Danny D.

    Danny D. Guest

    Interesting, they call it a "Church Key".

    I have an old (way way way old) one, Ballantine stamped on it,
    stored somewhere in the garage.
     
  19. Denis G.

    Denis G. Guest

    I'll see your nylon and raise you a pliable vinyl end cap.
     
  20. Ed Huntress

    Ed Huntress Guest

    Here's a thought to keep in mind for the future. It's the way that
    gunsmiths annealed spots on (case hardened) '03 Springfield receivers,
    for drilling to mount a scope.

    Cut the head off of a 12d nail, or use other appropriately sized
    pieces of mild steel bar. Chuck the nail or bar in your drill press
    and mount the work firmly in your vise.

    Get the spindle turning at a medium speed, bring the nail down onto
    the work, and press down firmly. You want to make a spot glow at least
    dark cherry red from friction.

    Take the nail out of the drill chuck and chuck your drill bit. Drill
    as deep as you need, or as deep as you can. If necessary, remove the
    bit, re-chuck the nail, and do the whole thing again. The annealing
    doesn't run very deep.

    I've used this method to drill flat springs, and it worked great for
    me. It also leaves a minimum amount of distortion and a minimal
    heat-affected zone.
     
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