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How do I know what a 110 volt outlet is?

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Bradley Burton, Mar 22, 2008.

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  1. The instructions for a wireless headset I bought said to insert the AC
    adapter into a 110 volt outlet. I have a pretty high quality power
    strip. Would that work? How do I know what a 110 volt outlet is?
    Thanks.
     
  2. BobW

    BobW Guest

    You're serious, right? Okay, I'll bite.

    If you live in the USA, then those things on the walls that have two little
    vertical slits and an adjacent round little hole are "110 volt outlets".
    Those things with only one vertical slit and an opposing round little hole
    are called women.

    Bob
     
  3. Lord Garth

    Lord Garth Guest

    Uhoh! My outlet is measuring 122 volts right now.... ;-)
     
  4. bw

    bw Guest

    Your TV has a plug.
    It is plugged into an outlet, probably on the wall.
    That's the 110 volt outlet.
    Pull the TV plug out of the wall and look at the two metal prongs.
    Your AC adapter has two metal prongs that look the same as the TV plug.
    Put the AC adapter plug with two metal prongs into the wall where the TV was
    plugged.

    The opposite end of the AC adapter fit into the wireless headset.
     
  5. Pack it all up in the original packing and return it to the store and get
    your money back.

    You're not smart enough to have it.
     

  6. There are no 110 volt outlets, and there haven't been for over 50
    years.


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  7. Like this?


    (.) (.)


    (!)

    It seems like old-timers refer to it as 110, and now it seems to be more
    commonly known as 120. At one time I thought the standard was 117 VAC, and
    I've also heard 115 and 125. Yet a three phase source with 120 VAC L-N is
    always called 208, AFAIK, even though the actual P-P voltage may vary from
    200 to 225. Similarly, 480 VAC is sometimes called 440 or 460, but the L-N
    is always referred to as 277, which corresponds to 480 / sqrt(3). I have
    also heard it explained that the voltage source is described with the
    higher number, such as 120, 240, or 480 while the equipment nameplate is a
    lower number, such as 110 or 115, 220 or 230, or 440 or 460. Rather
    confusing. And the actual voltage can vary by 10-15%.

    And the standard common NEMA 5-15 outlet
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEMA_connector is actually rated 125 VAC
    (maximum), and that is also the way fuses and circuit breakers are usually
    rated (125, 250, and 600 VAC are most common). These are also referred to
    as "Low Voltage", under 600 VAC. Then there is "Medium Voltage" 601-5000
    VAC, and above that is "High Voltage", although I think there may be
    another class of "Very High Voltage" above 138 kV, used for transmission
    (as opposed to distribution).

    Probably much more than the OP needed to know...

    Paul
     
  8. John G

    John G Guest

    Oh Michael! The older you get the more pedantic you get.

    All those crappy little outlets with two parallel pins and maybe a
    round(ish) ground pin are, to normal people, 110, 117 or 120 volt outlets.

    Of course if the USA had a simple consitant power system they would just be
    General Purpose Outlets.

    John G.
     
  9. BobG

    BobG Guest

    The interesting tale I heard was that California in the 50s actually
    had 110v at the outlets and Leo Fender wound his guitar amplifier
    secondaries to give 550V on the plates of the 6L6's. Of course, if you
    took one of those amps with the 'California transformers' back East
    and ran it on 117V, it would really have a blusesy sound for a while,
    as the load line got pushed up into a groovy compression region. The
    Chief Engineer at Ace music in Miami made a good living for a couple
    decades replicating this setup for guitar players that could afford it
    and appreciate it.
     

  10. Geese! You crack an old joke and someone takes offense! ;-)


    The numbers have changed over the years as the distribution system
    was completed, with more substations. This keeps the secondaries
    shorter, and having a pole pig or pad mounted transformer per handful of
    homes makes the line voltage more stable.

    The line voltage was as low as 90 volts at the end of a long line at
    times, but you rarely see those problems these days.


    It is consistent to us. It's the outsiders who can't grasp the
    differences. Why use the same outlet for your electric shaver, and the
    electric oven, or dryer? You don't use the same plugs for three phase
    and single phase, so what's the difference?


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  11. John G

    John G Guest


    We do use only one plug for all domestic appliances and ovens are usually
    hard wired.

    As for 3 phase. At least we have it available to home installations if we
    need it.

    John G.
     

  12. Yeah, you never know whne you'll need to power that 20' lathe with a
    20 HP three phase motor in your living room.

    Keep your system, but don't try to sell me on it.


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  13. Chris W

    Chris W Guest

    No but it sure would be nice to not need a 3 phase converter for my 5hp
    mill in the garage.

    --
    Chris W
    KE5GIX

    "Protect your digital freedom and privacy, eliminate DRM,
    learn more at http://www.defectivebydesign.org/what_is_drm"

    Ham Radio Repeater Database.
    http://hrrdb.com
     

  14. OTOH, a VFD lets you adjust the speed, and straight three phase can't
    do that.


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