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how do I copy from DVD to DVD?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Erich J. Schultheis, Jan 2, 2004.

  1. Franc Zabkar

    Franc Zabkar Guest

    I'm not sure what you mean here. If by "cost of importing" you mean
    freight costs, then doesn't the end user ultimately pay for this
    anyway?
    Only if I can defeat region coding.
    So make PAL and NTSC versions of your DVD titles and give me the
    option of buying either. No need to use region coding.
    So distribute the movie, make your money, and then release the DVD. No
    need to resort to region coding.
    That's just fine for American viewers. However, Australia gets short
    shrift when it comes to product releases.

    - Franc Zabkar
     
  2. Justin

    Justin Guest

    Franc Zabkar wrote on [Tue, 06 Jan 2004 21:52:06 +1100]:
    My response was a bit.... weird.

    OK, from your argument I took it to mean that you meant to build the
    costs of producing the product for two different markets, then both of
    those markets should cover the cost fo the second market.

    And that's fairly trivial.

    You have it.
    So, let's take a smaller "big" movie, like Underworld, and see how this
    works. This movie hasn't been released in Australia yet, but is on DVD
    today. I'm assuming it's being released in Aus in January because it's a
    "summer" movie, meaning something to entertain people in the air
    conditioning in the summer heat. The US release of the DVD should be
    held up because of this? Or the worldwide release should be?
    True enough. Australia get's the short shrift on everything else, too.
     
  3. No Time

    No Time Guest

    Nice try. You have the choice to buy the product at whatever price the
    market is charging in whatever the form the market is offering it, or
    you don't. Isn't capitalism grand?
    No, sorry, they don't have to cater to you. You'll probably feel
    better when you realize the world doesn't revolve around you.
    Except they're the ones who want to and it's their material. When you
    actually produce a new media type, you can choose to make it more
    accomodating to people who whine on usenet. Until then, you're out of
    luck.
    Then move. Simple enough. While you're getting your seed money
    together, try to come to terms with the fact that you have no rights
    whatsoever to other people's property; they make the rules and you can
    either abide by them and attain their products or don't and not. Your
    choice.
     
  4. Franc Zabkar

    Franc Zabkar Guest

    Even if that were true, the point is that the consumer should not have
    to resort to defeating artifical restrictions.

    Have a look at this non-trivial region coding hack for a Sony
    DVP-NS300 DVD player:

    http://www.dvdrhelp.com/dvdhacks.php?select=Sony+DVP-NS300

    To hack this player, one requires a special remote control. And even
    if one does complete the convoluted process of converting this player
    for multiregion use, there is still RCE to contend with.
    No. Region coding prevents me from playing European PAL titles in my
    Australian PAL player, for example.
    I see your point. However, in this case there are two competing
    interests, mine and theirs. I don't accept that my free access to DVD
    titles should be forever thwarted by the studio's desire for an
    orderly release. In any case, how did the studios survive when the
    only format was region free VHS?

    - Franc Zabkar
     
  5. Justin

    Justin Guest

    Franc Zabkar wrote on [Thu, 08 Jan 2004 07:40:56 +1100]:
    Then the consumer is free to get a different DVD player, that is easier
    to play multiple regions from. Or use a PC, which is the only way I can
    play non region 1 DVDs at the moment. Mainly region 4, btw.

    You have the option of buying a DVD player that can play region 2. Hell,
    you could probably get a UK DVD player, change the plugs on it, and it
    would work just fine.

    And a fair chance to promote it, as well. Ever notice that stars tend to
    travel around and promote their big movies? They can't be in two places
    at once. Also, it's still their product and they can decide when it goes
    on sale in a certain market.
    There wasn't this big enabler called the Internet, that made searching a
    buying a product a 5 minute ordeal. Also, DVDs are coming out to the
    consumer market months and years faster than VHS ever did. Most major
    releases in the US hit DVD in 4 months or so these days. It used to be
    that mostly only rental priced VHS was available for another 6 months or
    so before sell through prices were placed on video tapes.

    I also firmly believe that DVD has really kickstarted the home movie
    collection.... whereas VHS was fairly stagnant because it was built in
    obsolescence.
     
  6. no spam

    no spam Guest

    A Sony employee, no doubt!
    Nice try. You have the choice to buy the product at whatever price the
    market is charging in whatever the form the market is offering it, or
    you don't. Isn't capitalism grand?
    No, sorry, they don't have to cater to you. You'll probably feel
    better when you realize the world doesn't revolve around you.
    Except they're the ones who want to and it's their material. When you
    actually produce a new media type, you can choose to make it more
    accomodating to people who whine on usenet. Until then, you're out of
    luck.
    Then move. Simple enough. While you're getting your seed money
    together, try to come to terms with the fact that you have no rights
    whatsoever to other people's property; they make the rules and you can
    either abide by them and attain their products or don't and not. Your
    choice.
    [/QUOTE]
     
  7. DarkMatter

    DarkMatter Guest

    WRONG GROUP(S) ya fucking retards!
     
  8. Marcus

    Marcus Guest

    to a DVD-R and my DVD recorder said "Can Not Copy".
    cable from my DVD player which is preventing me from recording to DVD?

    Erich,

    Basically, it's CGMS stopping you making a copy of a commercial DVD
    (CopyGuard), which is what the recorder is supposed to be doing. Legally.

    I'm with the others, go out and buy the movies in question if you like them.
    You can afford a DVD recorder, right? and if off digital cable and the
    antenna is fine, then how about buying the movies you really like?


    Marcus
     
  9. Marcus

    Marcus Guest

    You're missing the point. The other poster wanted to make COPIES of
    COPYRIGHTED materials on his DVD recorder. That's just not on, sorry - hence
    "cannot copy" being displayed. I really don't care if you think it's a laugh
    or not - we'll see who's laughing when people like yourself get caught for
    pirating and distributing copyrighted materials.

    Think I'm kidding? Try me - the Australiasian Film & Video Securities Office
    would LOVE to hear about that poster and their activities.

    Marcus
     
  10. Marcus

    Marcus Guest

    That's right, and you can record music onto it - music which is subject to
    copyright that you don't own is not a justifiable reason for recording.
    Sorry.


    Marcus
     
  11. Marcus

    Marcus Guest

    Bzzt. Sorry, wrong answer. Go ahead and share music, fine - DON'T share
    music if it's copyrighted and you are not the copyright holder.
    Sorry, wrong answer again. There's a thing called Shareware, and another
    called Freeware, that you can legally distribute. Microsoft, Photoshop etc
    forget it - they are COPYRIGHTED software, and running a pirated copy simply
    for the sake of familiarising yourself is just not acceptable, nor legal.
    Wrong. This is why they're on sale on the first place. Want a backup? Fine,
    then get TWO copies, and use ONE as a working copy, and keep the other in a
    safe place. Why bother making a version to cut the trailers and commercials?
    The button which is on every remote is akin to "Track select
    forward/reverse". Use it.
    You do huh? Okay, think about this then. You seem to love every sense of
    piracy.

    Person A buys for example's sake, a Billy Joel album on CD. Person B gets
    this album, makes a copy and gives it to a mate, who in turn makes a copy
    for his, and so on and so on. These people who have the copies don't go out
    and buy the CD as they have a pirate copy. Sales fall, artist eventually
    decides to not make any more music, and then the pirates also lose out
    because there is no raw material for them to copy from, ensuring no material
    is available anymore. You want this to happen to *everyone*? I doubt it.
    Using copy-protection is SUPPOSED to have an effect on potential,
    professional pirates. Period.
    ...and they will remain high for as long as people break copy protection
    systems and distribute pirated versions of the material. Think!
    I bet they'd love to hear what you've just spat out for piracy.


    Marcus
     
  12. Cornholio

    Cornholio Guest

    You need to get some software called "DVD X Copy"
    Then when you get your own copy, be sure to convert the movie to SVCD
    and post it in the DVD2SVCD newsgroup to we can also have a copy.
    Forget Marcus, Dark Helmet and the other anti-piracy homos. Let them
    sit at home and stress out about piracy going on that they can't
    control.
     
  13. Sarah

    Sarah Guest

    why pay when you can do it free: dvdshrink.org
     
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