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how do I copy from DVD to DVD?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Erich J. Schultheis, Jan 2, 2004.

  1. Mike Davis

    Mike Davis Guest

    Hey Jerry,
    You seem like a pretty reasonable guy, but I beg to differ on your
    opinion on copying. I'll give you a personal example; I've got three kids
    ten and under, with another in the oven. I darm sure copy the Disney DVD's
    using DVD X Copy. The kids are good kids, but they are still kids, no way in
    the world are they going to treat my discs like I do.
    I see nothing wrong with making copies for personal use. I don't sell
    and don't lend them out (other than rare exceptions) either. If I want a
    copy of the "Lion King" so the original stays pristene I don't think that is
    out of line. The artist is paid and no copies go out in the gene pool, if
    you know what I mean <ggg.>
    All the best, Mike
     
  2. Richard   C.

    Richard C. Guest

    :
    :
    : because the media industry is just SO SO SO SO greedy..

    =============================
    When you start working for free, then you can say such things.

    putz.
     
  3. Richard   C.

    Richard C. Guest

    :
    : What I am saying is that You
    : shouldnt need to pay 20$ for ghostbusters on DVD,

    ========================
    You DON'T "need" to pay that.
    If you don't want to, then don't buy it or watch it.

    Simple.
    ========================
     
  4. Richard   C.

    Richard C. Guest

    :
    :
    : The Inital cost was of the movie profit took care of the film marketing,
    : film production, all cost associated with making the film and bringing it to
    : market. The conversion (for modern) films from the reel to the dvd isnt
    : that high (or did this movie decide to record everything in non-digital then
    : edit after the fact)..
    :
    ===================
    Why should they even release it for the home market if there is no money in it for
    them?

    Your attitude is pathetic.
    ================
     
  5. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest


    Well there is where things get fuzzy, legally you *should* in theory be able
    to make one backup copy for personal use, however there's that silly DMCA
    which is very broad and makes it illegal to break the CSS encryption for any
    purpose, so you're kinda screwed there. That said, I seriously doubt the
    feds are gonna bust down your door for making a personal backup and I
    wouldn't hesitate to do it, but obviously I wouldn't go selling copies to
    people, I don't particularly like the industry, but it's still their product
    and I find most DVD's to be reasonably priced anyway.
     
  6. tempus fugit

    tempus fugit Guest

    I agree with Dark. Just because you think they are making too much profit
    doesn't give you the right to steal it.
    That being said (and I agree wholeheartedly with copy protection),
    Macrovision sucks. I got a DVD player and my ancient TV has no RCA ins. My
    VCR does though, but I can't use it for DVD's because the macrovision kicks
    in. I have no interest in copying a DVD, I just want to watch the f'in
    thing.

    I ended up buying a modulator (was going to build one, but couldn't be
    bothered)./
     
  7. What is called "very sophisticated copy protection"? Certainly nothing that
    DVDs have. Pirates can make bit-perfect copies of DVD movies in less than
    an hour. This is the problem that I've seen with almost all copy protection
    to date...they hurt legitimate consumers while not affecting professional
    pirates at all.

    For music, copy protection has at best created a annoyance for legitimate
    customers while *increasing* the market for pirates and pushing people more
    towards piracy.

    Music, video and software are all different areas where I have different
    attitudes towards copying. I've worked in all three industries and have
    been a consumer who spends an order of magnitude more than the average
    person on each.

    MUSIC: I have no problems with people sharing music by any means necessary.
    I think sharing music *is* the moral thing to do and the recording industry
    should be destroyed.

    SOFTWARE: Likewise, I have no problems with people pirating any Microsoft
    software. I have no problem with people pirating other productive software
    for personal use...in the sense of someone pirating PhotoShop so they can be
    familiar with it when they go to work somewhere that the company will buy it
    for them.

    VIDEO: DVDs are so incredibly reasonable in terms of pricing. I'm against
    pirating DVDs, but I do feel it's ok to use a DVD that you've purchased for
    personal use. This would include making a back up, making a version that
    strips out forced trailers and commercials, or using the content for
    personal use...such as making a CD of some of the audio or making a game for
    your children based on the video/art elements.

    In summary, it's a "**** the recording industry and **** microsoft" attitude
    along with if empowering the consumer with what they can do with the
    content/software ultimately leads to more sales than go for it.
    Actually it's not. Studios are paying a lot of money for something that's
    broken. Macrovision, region coding and CSS don't work. Even if they did
    work, it would not be in their financial best interest to utilize these. It
    will be interesting to see if they figure this out before the next format
    dominates the market.
    Well you said "media" instead of "movie"...as I mentioned above, I *want*
    the recording industry to be destroyed.

    In terms of the movie industry, I think they're treading a close line
    between doing things the right way and falling into the same trap as the
    recording industry.

    For now, prices are totally reasonable, and piracy is extremely low...they
    make it seem much larger than it actually is.

    However I do see the movie industry making some crucial mistakes such as:
    1) Limiting the availability of titles. I'm not talking about not getting
    around to releasing titles, but not having a released title always be
    available. The studios need to provide custom ordering. This could be very
    inexpensive...hell it could be entirely automated. Think NetFlix with DVDs
    being burned for the order and shipped for purchase. Without evergreen
    availability, people will pirate DVDs solely because they want out-of-print
    titles.

    2) Using copy-protection that only annoys consumers, but has no affect
    whatsoever on professional pirates.

    3) Developing big-brother strategies. Remember Divx? It was never cracked.
    Studios are considering a DivxII, not so much in terms of a marketing
    strategy but in terms of what they can do to produce a really secure (and
    upgradeable) copy protection scheme. Two copy protection schemes I've heard
    them considering include a Divx like authentication system and a spindle
    hologram which contains part of the code key.
    This is great as long as prices remain low and titles remain available.
    Interestingly though US law actually says otherwise. What is not debatable
    is that (in the US) you have fair use laws for media content which do go
    beyond just having a back up copy like with software. The only real debate
    is whether the fair laws are superceded by the fact that it's illegal to
    circumvent digital copy protection. Even if it is, it would still be legal
    to from digital media to digital media as long as it's within fair use and
    the content itself was in analog form at some point during the process.
    I'm currently working full time in the software industry, but I often work
    in the film, tv, radio or music industries.
     
  8. Justin

    Justin Guest

    MR_ED_of_Course wrote on [Sat, 03 Jan 2004 06:26:34 GMT]:
    And games? No matter how crappy.
     
  9. rstlne

    rstlne Guest


    What if say a car dealer decided to go by the same type of markups that this
    stuff is on.. That would make a bare Geo go for probably about 750k
    I wish you were my customer!
     
  10. Richard   C.

    Richard C. Guest

    :
    : The DVD store format is the same for every region..
    : NTSC/Pal/whatever is done by the DVD player itself
    :
    ================================
    Not on this planet.
     
  11. Richard   C.

    Richard C. Guest

    :
    : : >
    : > : > :
    : > :
    : > : The Inital cost was of the movie profit took care of the film marketing,
    : > : film production, all cost associated with making the film and bringing
    : it to
    : > : market. The conversion (for modern) films from the reel to the dvd isnt
    : > : that high (or did this movie decide to record everything in non-digital
    : then
    : > : edit after the fact)..
    : > :
    : > ===================
    : > Why should they even release it for the home market if there is no money
    : in it for
    : > them?
    : >
    : > Your attitude is pathetic.
    : > ================
    :
    :
    : What if say a car dealer decided to go by the same type of markups that this
    : stuff is on.. That would make a bare Geo go for probably about 750k
    : I wish you were my customer!
    :
    =================
    Did you ever buy PARTS for that Geo?

    The markup over the entire movie industry, counting ALL product, is not as great as
    you imply.
    ==================
     
  12. Franc Zabkar

    Franc Zabkar Guest

    They have been in the case of Sony's Playstation. Australia's consumer
    watchdog (ACCC) has determined that region coding, at least in the
    case of the PS2, is in violation of restrictive trade practices
    legislation. Unfortunately the ACCC does not have the testicular
    fortitude to take the next logical step and prosecute Sony for same.

    ======================================================================
    http://abc.net.au/news/newsitems/s634309.htm

    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission has praised a
    Federal Court decision allowing Sony Playstation users to modify their
    consoles.

    Sony failed to convince the court that the use of modification chips,
    to allow users to play imported and copied games, was a breach of
    copyright.

    The court action began when Sony tried to stop a small retailer
    selling the chips.

    The commission's Alan Fels says Sony's attempts to prohibit the use of
    overseas and copied games inhibited consumer rights.

    "In Australia, we have very limited range of games compared to other
    regions such as the United States," he said.

    "The consumer choice is restricted, and there is potential to charge
    different, higher prices in the best competitive Australian market."
    ======================================================================


    - Franc Zabkar
     
  13. Franc Zabkar

    Franc Zabkar Guest

    You're a blind capitalist apologist.
    They have no such rights. In civilised countries such as Australia, we
    have legislation to ensure that prices are set by fair competition.
    Region coding flies in the face of this principle and offenders should
    be prosecuted.

    ==========================================================================
    http://www.findarticles.com/cf_dls/m0NEW/2002_Feb_10/82746578/p1/article.jhtml

    The ACCC has been granted leave to be heard as a "friend of the court"
    in Sony's action in relation to whether modifying PlayStation consoles
    with "mod chips" infringes new parts of Australia's Copyright Act
    1968.

    Fels claims they do not and alleges Sony is seeking to use the Act to
    restrict Australian consumers' access to a wider and cheaper range of
    games than they can get in Australia.

    But a statement issued by Fels on Friday makes it plain more than
    computer games is on his mind. He says the ACCC has for some time been
    investigating the regional playback control (RPC) technology present
    in DVD players and accompanying films - which it maintains means
    consumers are forced to pay higher prices for films with fewer
    features and a lesser range of titles.

    Fels also noted that a recent review by the Intellectual Property and
    Competition Review Committee recommended repeal of the parallel
    importation restrictions on computer software.
    ==========================================================================
    No corporation or cartel should be free to exploit the consumer.


    - Franc Zabkar
     
  14. No... The commercial DVD's are 8.7 gigs because they use dual layering
    technology that most home burner units can't do. Some movies are more
    than the 4.7 gig and they have only one format on the disc.

    It all depends on the original encoding of the disc...
     
  15. DarkMatter

    DarkMatter Guest


    Look, ya dumbfuck! If I make a movie, I am the ONLY one allowed to
    sell it. THERE IS NO COMPETITION to piss and moan about. The movie
    is MINE TO SELL, and mine alone.

    It is a monopoly by default, and is perfectly legal in ALL free
    nations.

    If YOU make a product that others can make and compete with you for
    market share in, fine, but movies are SINGULAR works of art, and ONLY
    the studio that made them should EVER profit from one.

    If I paint a painting, it is MINE and mine alone. I am the ONLY one
    allowed to sell it, or copies of it.

    AT WHATEVER PRICE I WANT, IN WHATEVER MARKET I SELL IT IN.
     
  16. rstlne

    rstlne Guest

    They have no such rights. In civilised countries such as Australia, we
    Yeh, And if someone buys a work of art from you they should be able to
    resell it too
    Also they can make copy's of it and sell it as a copy..

    You sure that this is what you were meaning?.. I mean.. If you define movies
    as art then really they should only release 1 copy of it, it should be sold
    as unique, and then non-originals could be resold down the road..

    Keep the ideas rolling in here
     
  17. According to international copyright law, a buyer can resell the copy
    he legally obtained, but he is still not allowed to make or sell
    copies without permission.

    Mischa
     
  18. DarkMatter

    DarkMatter Guest

    You can. THE ORIGINAL WORK. BUT NOT COPIES OF IT, you retarded
    bastard!
     
  19. DarkMatter

    DarkMatter Guest

    Wrong. You cannot simply make prints of a work of art, and start
    selling them on a street corner as yours if the work of art is not
    YOURS.

    Can you be any MORE RETARDED?
    You don't get it, retard boy. What I am saying is that the original
    studio is the ONLY owner of ANY copy of the work.

    They are the ONLY firm that should EVER profit from it.
    You're a goddamned retarded kook ****.
     
  20. DarkMatter

    DarkMatter Guest

    EXACTLY.
     
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