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how determine type unknown connection?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by mohammad2050, Dec 11, 2014.

  1. mohammad2050

    mohammad2050

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    Dec 11, 2014
    hi
    I have a device that has a communication port but I do not know which type of connection.
    I've measured the voltages on pins , that The following values were obtained :
    [​IMG]

    in your opinion , this is which connection??how can determine type connection ?
    in The manufacturer's catalog Been picture following :
    [​IMG]

    Also come in the catalog the following descriptions :
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    Welcome to electronicspoint.

    Obviously this is an RS232 connection using a special MIL-style connector.
     
  3. mohammad2050

    mohammad2050

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    0
    Dec 11, 2014
    hi Harald Kapp ,
    why rs232 ?! Here is 3.5 volt on pin in idle time while reach to 12 volt in rs232 ,
    transducer is used for convert to RS232 , As has been said in the catalog
     
  4. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    RS232 signaling voltage are specified as +-3 to +-15, so 3.5V is a valid signal level.

    Bob
     
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  5. mohammad2050

    mohammad2050

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    Dec 11, 2014
    Of course , but this voltage is in idle time and this voltage Becomes 0 to 2v or 3.5 to 5 v in run time
     
  6. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    That sounds like TTL levels then. You would need something like a MAX232 to convert them to RS232.

    Bob
     
    mohammad2050 likes this.
  7. mohammad2050

    mohammad2050

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    Dec 11, 2014
    Excuse me Bob , My previous post is incorrect
    I get below voltage in run time on each pin :
    top and bottom pin are nearly 3.5 volt and Remain at the same level when pc and device exchange data together .
    left pin become nearly -4.92 volt in connect time and change when pc and device exchange data together (for example become -0.8 or -2.3 or -3.2 and then return to -4.92 when pc and device do not exchange data together )
    and voltages after Manufacturer Transducer are following :
    voltage on rxd pin is -4.9 volt in connect time and Remain at the same level when pc and device exchange data together .
    voltage on txd pin is -2.9 volt in connect time and change when pc and device exchange data together (for example become 2.4 or 1.8 or -0.4 and then return to -2.9 when pc and device do not exchange data together )
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2014
  8. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    Okay then, It does sound like RS232.

    It sounds like you are successfully exchanging data then, is this correct?

    Bob
     
  9. mohammad2050

    mohammad2050

    5
    0
    Dec 11, 2014
    yes i can exchanging data between device and pc but do not understand What do Transducer ؟؟
    before Transducer(on device pin) voltages are following :
    top and bottom pin are nearly 3.5 volt and Remain at the same level when pc and device exchange data together .
    left pin become nearly -4.92 volt in connect time and change when pc and device exchange data together (for example become -0.8 or -2.3 or -3.2 and then return to -4.92 when pc and device do not exchange data together )
    and voltages after Manufacturer Transducer(on 9 pin male So that 9 pin female is connect to pc) are following :
    voltage on rxd pin is -4.9 volt in connect time and Remain at the same level when pc and device exchange data together .
    voltage on txd pin is -2.9 volt in connect time and change when pc and device exchange data together (for example become 2.4 or 1.8 or -0.4 and then return to -2.9 when pc and device do not exchange data together )
     
  10. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    I presume you are measuring with a multimeter. The signals are changing rapidly and the multimeter cannot follow them. You will get something like the average voltage over the time the multimeter is sampling. If you want to really see what is going on, you need an oscilloscope or logic analyzer.

    Bob
     
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