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Hookups for 6V dry batteries (4R25)?

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Dmitri, Dec 1, 2005.

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  1. Dmitri

    Dmitri Guest

    This is as basic as it gets.

    I need to build a bank out of three of these 6V dry zinc/manganese (I
    think 4R25 is a proper ID or just lantern battery) for an application.
    Question is: how do you hook them up reliably? The batteries have spring
    terminals at the top, and I presume most devices that use them (like
    emergency lights or flashlights) simply have matching pair of contacts on
    the inside of the case cavity. In my case I would have to use a makeshift
    case and therefore have to figure out some way of reliable hookup.
    Had anyone ever seen a holder for those batteries sold anywhere? What are
    my other options, other than the simple alligator clips?

    -------------------------------------
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    Dmitri Abaimov, RCDD
    http://www.cabling-design.com
    Cabling Forum, color codes, pinouts and other useful resources for
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  2. Vey

    Vey Guest

    I think they make batteries like that with brass knurled nuts on top
    rather than springs. I thought it would be easy to find a "lantern
    battery holder", but I am striking out.
     
  3. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    In the US, we can get those same batteries with thumbscrew binding post
    terminals. You might have to shop around a bit.

    Failing that, if you're handy with tools, if you could build a sort of
    L-shaped frame that they could sit on, kind of like an open-sided display
    case, with sort of a hinged lid with 6 strips of copper tape stuck to the
    bottom and connected appropriately. Arrange for a way to lock it down at
    the right pressure, of course.

    Good Luck!
    Rich
     
  4. I wonder if he isn't talking about the old fashion "fanstock" clip? If so,
    it might be better to plan soldering to them.

    Albert
     
  5. spudnuty

    spudnuty Guest

    In the old days uhh ~70s as I remember you could still get those 6V
    lantern batteries with nuts on top of them also earlier you could get
    them with the clips. This was when they were used for the filaments of
    "portable" tube radios. For quite a while after they still had the
    screw tops as the lanterns they were made for had a little adapter
    plate that screwed to the tops of the batteries. Gradually it became
    cheaper I guess to just have those springs on top and they clipped into
    the lanterns.
    I just Googled them they're still made, here's a whole page of them.
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&q=6V+lantern+batteries+screw+top&btnG=Search
    I see Eveready still makes them. I set off more stuff with one of
    those...
    I recently built a back up using rechargeable lead acids like a scooter
    battery. Cheap and available in 12 and 6 volt.
    Richard
     
  6. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

  7. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Y'know? Speaking of Fahnstock clips, I wonder if anybody still makes them?
    I have an application in mind, where they'd be ideal. It's a macroscopic
    breadboard type of thing (yes, on an actual wooden board, with thumbtacks
    and little strips cut out of a coffee can lid), and Fahnstock (Fahnestock?)
    clips would be ideal for on-the-fly configuration.

    Thanks!
    Rich
     
  8. Chris

    Chris Guest

    Hi, Rich. Look at Mouser -- they still stock 'em:

    http://www.mouser.com/index.cfm?han...uctid=232249&e_categoryid=126&e_pcodeid=52400
    or
    http://tinyurl.com/8ehjr

    Also, you might want to look at the mighty HH Smith's P/N 539.

    Have fun
    Chris
     
  9. ehsjr

    ehsjr Guest

    Lots of ways to do it - here's one.
    Make a contact plate, like this:

    Top view, wood
    ------------------------------
    | * * * * |
    | * * * * | < Wood lath or plexiglass with two
    | * * * * | holes for the springs to pass
    ------------------------------ through and notches at ends



    Edge view, wood + PC board
    with battery underneath
    pppppppp pppppppp <- Two pieces of pc board (p) glued to
    wwww/wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww\www <- wood (w). Springs (sss) pass through
    / sss sss \ holes in wood and contact the copper.
    / --------------------- \ <-- Wires soldered to the copper PC board
    / | | \ pass through small holes drilled in
    | BATTERY | the wood and go to the circuit
    | |
    | |
    | |
    | |
    | |
    | |
    | |
    ---------------------

    The notches in the ends fit around posts made from
    threaded rod. A nut on each post is tightened to put
    pressure on the springs. The other end of the threaded
    rod goes through a wood base to a nut and washer recessed
    into the wood. The battery sits on the wood base. If
    you don't have a forstner bit for making the recess for
    the nut and washer, do this:

    -------------------------------------
    | || || |
    | || <---------RODS---------> || | <--Base 3/4" pine
    | || || |
    -------------------------------------
    NUT | 1/2" thick | NUT
    | plywood |
    ----------------------


    Finally, a keeper plate - wood lath or plexi with two holes drilled
    in it that hold the rods perpendicular. Here's the whole assembly:

    || ||
    ====||========KEEPER PLATE=======||====
    || ||
    NUT pppppppp ppppppp NUT
    |wwww/wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww\wwww|
    || / sss sss \ ||
    || / --------------------- \ ||
    || | | ||
    || | BATTERY | ||
    || | | ||
    || | | ||
    || | | ||
    || | | ||
    || | | ||
    || | | ||
    || | | ||
    || | | ||
    || --------------------- ||
    -------------------------------------
    | || || |
    | || <---------RODS---------> || | <--Base 3/4" pine
    | || || |
    -------------------------------------
    NUT | 1/2 thick | NUT
    | plywood |
    ----------------------

    If you drill the holes for the threaded rods a bit oversize,
    you will be able to spread the threaded rods at the top when
    the keeper plate is removed. That allows the notched contact
    plate to be removed easily for battery replacement, with no
    need to readjust the nut for the correct pressure. When you
    first assemble it and adjust the nuts, a little nail polish
    or locktite will hold them in place.

    Ed
     
  10. Dmitri

    Dmitri Guest

    Thank you all who responded here. After reading suggestions here and
    looking at some battery prices I decided to think outside the box, so to
    speak. It looks like I will spend a little fortune replacing those
    batteries, and therefore it makes perfect sense to go with sealed lead
    acid re-chargeable batteries. Those, fortunately, present no problem in
    terms of the hookups.
    Thanks again, everyone.


    -------------------------------------
    --
    Dmitri Abaimov, RCDD
    http://www.cabling-design.com
    Cabling Forum, color codes, pinouts and other useful resources for
    premises cabling users and pros
    http://www.cabling-design.com/homecabling
    Residential Cabling Guide

    -
    ##-----------------------------------------------#
    Article posted with Cabling-Design.com Newsgroup Archiv
    http://www.cabling-design.com/forum
    no-spam Web and RSS interface to your favorite newsgroup -
    sci.electronics.basics - 28059 messages and counting
    ##-----------------------------------------------##
     
  11. spudnuty

    spudnuty Guest

    I just used a battery at American Science on the 2nd page of this URL
    for a backup for a client:
    http://www.sciplus.com/category.cfm?subsection=13
    It looked pretty new and ran down at 90% of it's rating. A lot cheaper
    too, shipping would have been $6.
    Richard
     
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