Connect with us

Hobbyist-to-USB adapter?

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Rich Grise, Sep 18, 2004.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Is there such a thing as a hobbyist-to-USB adapter? Or, maybe
    the question should be, how hard is it to interface to a USB
    port?

    Where do you start looking for something like that? Google
    "usb port spec", I suppose. ;-)

    The reason I ask is that I was just sitting here musing about
    this laptop I have - I can play video games on it with MAME.
    So I could go to a bar and sit and play my computer. ;-)

    Or, find some way to plug in a set of controls, and play
    competitively in bars. >:->

    My laptop[0] has a serial, LPT, 2x USB, 2X some card bus thingie
    that takes something almost exactly the size of the Star Trek
    "tapes," with a connector very much like an ordinary 40-pin
    IDC header, but mini. It also says something about IR when it
    boots. So I have a lot of options.

    Let the melee begin!

    Thanks,
    Rich

    [0]
    IBM Thinkpad T30
    P4 1.2GHz
    Slack/WinXP
    MAME ;-)
     
  2. Jim Miller

    Jim Miller Guest

    usb takes quite a bit of work depending on what you want to do.

    take a look at the ftbi products. they're pretty nice for hobbiest and other
    use.

    jtm


    Is there such a thing as a hobbyist-to-USB adapter? Or, maybe
    the question should be, how hard is it to interface to a USB
    port?

    Where do you start looking for something like that? Google
    "usb port spec", I suppose. ;-)

    The reason I ask is that I was just sitting here musing about
    this laptop I have - I can play video games on it with MAME.
    So I could go to a bar and sit and play my computer. ;-)

    Or, find some way to plug in a set of controls, and play
    competitively in bars. >:->

    My laptop[0] has a serial, LPT, 2x USB, 2X some card bus thingie
    that takes something almost exactly the size of the Star Trek
    "tapes," with a connector very much like an ordinary 40-pin
    IDC header, but mini. It also says something about IR when it
    boots. So I have a lot of options.

    Let the melee begin!

    Thanks,
    Rich

    [0]
    IBM Thinkpad T30
    P4 1.2GHz
    Slack/WinXP
    MAME ;-)
     
  3. Jim Miller

    Jim Miller Guest

    bzzzt....

    not bi, rather di

    www.ftdichip.com

    jtm

    usb takes quite a bit of work depending on what you want to do.

    take a look at the ftbi products. they're pretty nice for hobbiest and other
    use.

    jtm


    Is there such a thing as a hobbyist-to-USB adapter? Or, maybe
    the question should be, how hard is it to interface to a USB
    port?

    Where do you start looking for something like that? Google
    "usb port spec", I suppose. ;-)

    The reason I ask is that I was just sitting here musing about
    this laptop I have - I can play video games on it with MAME.
    So I could go to a bar and sit and play my computer. ;-)

    Or, find some way to plug in a set of controls, and play
    competitively in bars. >:->

    My laptop[0] has a serial, LPT, 2x USB, 2X some card bus thingie
    that takes something almost exactly the size of the Star Trek
    "tapes," with a connector very much like an ordinary 40-pin
    IDC header, but mini. It also says something about IR when it
    boots. So I have a lot of options.

    Let the melee begin!

    Thanks,
    Rich

    [0]
    IBM Thinkpad T30
    P4 1.2GHz
    Slack/WinXP
    MAME ;-)
     
  4. Travis Hayes

    Travis Hayes Guest

    Take a lookie here... http://www.joystiq.com/entry/7817137582525561/
     
  5. Tim Wescott

    Tim Wescott Guest

    snip

    I don't think there are, and at any rate the hobbyist would have to be
    modified with appropriate interface hardware.
     
  6. There's the FT245BM (parallel) and FT232BM (serial 232) usb
    converter chips. www.voti.nl sells them.
     
  7. Dave Garnett

    Dave Garnett Guest

    The dlp stuff http://www.dlpdesign.com/ uses the ftdi chips and is easy to
    use. The modules with built in PIC are particularly convenient.

    <Usual disclaimer>

    Dave
     
  8. Rob

    Rob Guest

    The U4x1 devices from USBmicro will provide you with 16 I/O lines that
    you can use to interface with switches, buttons, and devices/sensors
    that provide a 0/5V signal, as well as output devices that accept CMOS
    levels. Relays/lights can be driven with the appropriate circuitry.

    The U4x1 devices will interface to a character-based LCD display. The
    devices also support two channels of stepper motor control (just add
    appropriate driver circuitry).

    The U4x1 devices have an interface that will support SPI (serial
    peripheral interface) control and can be used to communicate with serial
    A/D devices, serial pots, EEPROMS, and even program the Atmel AVR.

    The newest devices support the 1-wire bus on any I/o line and can
    communicate with Dallas 1-wire devices such as remote switches, A/D
    devices, and digital temperature devices.

    Information and applications available from http://www.usbmicro.com

    Devices available from http://www.dontronics.com
     
  9. Joerg

    Joerg Guest

    Hi Tim,
    No pun intended but I believe a regular hobbyist cannot be modified much
    with hardware. It would take some serious medication to do that ;-)

    Rich: From all I heard so far many people use the RS232-USB path that
    Frank was mentioning. It renders USB into something more familiar since
    RS232 is a really easy protocol and it also is a remedy for newer
    laptops that don't offer a RS232 port anymore.

    Regards, Joerg
     
  10. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

  11. I read in sci.electronics.design that Joerg <[email protected]
    No. Go find one and hit him with a brick. That will produce much
    modification, albeit somewhat uncontrolled. The medication is for
    afterwards.
     
  12. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    What ever happened with those neuron/silicon interface experiments?

    Thanks,
    Rich
     
  13. Is there such a thing as a hobbyist-to-USB adapter? Or, maybe
    http://www.voti.nl/shop/p/K-USB-1.html
    http://www.voti.nl/shop/p/K-USB-2-232.html

    bare FT232BM chip:

    http://www.voti.nl/shop/p/IC-FT232BM.html

    But note that an off-the-shelve USB-to-serial converter might be
    easier/cheaper:

    http://www.voti.nl/shop/p/M-USB-SERIAL-1.html


    Wouter van Ooijen

    -- ------------------------------------
    http://www.voti.nl
    PICmicro chips, programmers, consulting
     
  14. Rich Grise wrote:

    Neurons have been successfully interfaced to electronics.
    AFAIK the problem is solved, *without* dieback.

    --
    Dirk

    The Consensus:-
    The political party for the new millenium
    http://www.theconsensus.org
     
  15. Andy Peters

    Andy Peters Guest

    Common misconception: you don't "interface to a USB port." You
    interface to a USB device connected to the port. This is an important
    distinction.
    How about the USB Implementors' Forum? http://www.usb.org/ and
    download the spec.
    I guess the question is: what do you want to do?

    --a
     
  16. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Essentially, just hang a couple of joysticks/buttons off the
    laptop, to play two-player Bubble Bobble.

    Thanks!
    Rich
     
  17. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Well, that's way, WAY cool. Some years ago, I had a dream where
    microprocessorized prostheses were interfaced to nerve fibers
    somehow, so controlling it could seem "natural," and with a
    little thought, even possibly a sense of "touch." Heck, I don't
    see any reason that the amputee's brain couldn't learn to
    interpret signals from a position sensor, simulating kinesthesia.

    Who do I call? :)

    I'd also like to try to make a Kirlian photo of a "phantom limb."
    Any amputee volunteers?

    How about a "Neurophone?"

    Thanks,
    Rich
     
  18. A brain surgeon
    http://www.foresight.org/Nanomedicine/Neural.html
    I think Kirlian stuff was debunked long ago
    Not sure about that.
    Ever plugged yourself into an amp and had a listen?

    --
    Dirk

    The Consensus:-
    The political party for the new millenium
    http://www.theconsensus.org
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-