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High-voltage low-amperage computer -- any advantages?

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Radium, Jul 21, 2006.

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  1. Radium

    Radium Guest

    Hi:

    Would a computer designed to use high-voltage, low-amperage have any
    advantage over conventional computers? In this high-volt, low-amp PC,
    all of the components [motherboard, cpu, memory, video system
    (including the monitor), sound system (including the speakers)] rely on
    the high-voltage, low-amperage electricity. Speakers and monitor are
    purely digital and also use the high-voltage, low-amperage digital
    electricity. Speakers do not contain any diaphragm, instead they rely
    on "electrifying" the air -- similar to the Ionovac speaker -- to
    produce sound. The electric current directly causes the air molecules
    to vibrate and produce sound -- this makes it easy to reproduce
    high-frequency sounds than using a conventional speaker.

    In this system, the voltage is high but the amperage is low.

    The wattage of this system, however is around the same as that of the
    average PC.

    In addition, the only insulator is air. Other than that its all
    metallic conductors.

    Though this PC uses wattages around the same as most other PCs, the
    voltages required are enough to generate the bluish-white lights
    similar to those emitted from stun-guns [another example of extremely
    high-voltage, low-amperage equipment].

    This is a "plasma" computer.


    Thanks,

    Radium
     

  2. No, this is another of your pathetic attempts to troll the
    sci.electronics newsgroups.


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  3. Radium

    Radium Guest

    No. I am asking a serious questions and would appreciate serious
    answers.
     
  4. Alan B

    Alan B Guest

    Allrighty then. I'll take you at your word. All you have to do is
    completely re-design the entire semiconductor and audio-visual industries.
    It's a bit of a bite to chew, but have at it! Fill us in when you're done.
    Although I'm afraid the concept exceeds the "basics" part of the newsgroup
    charter (just a bit), I think it's a splendid project.
     

  5. Your questions look like you are throwing darts at a bunch of words
    and posting the hits as questions. If you really are serious you need
    to pick up some basic books on electronics and learn how to ask valid
    questions.


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  6. Guest

    The problem is that insulation for highvoltage in densly packed chips is not
    a working solution. Add to that slowspeeds due excessive rise times.
    (reach 1000V in a few ns in a chip.. don't think so..)

    The only benefit highvoltage gives in this context is in the powersupply that
    could use very long cables. However.. I dault it's useful anyway.

    Dead on arrival IOW.

    If you look at current trends it's towards lower volts (like 1.2V). Makeing
    your powersupply an excellent welder. Which some unfortunate people have
    experienced due catastrophic failure (hello AMD ;)
     
  7. redbelly

    redbelly Guest

    Nobody believes this, no matter how many times you say it.
     

  8. He doesn't even believe it.


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
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