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Help with transmit and receive sending

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by KTW, Mar 1, 2015.

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  1. KTW

    KTW

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    Feb 22, 2015
    I'm looking at this transmitter and receiver for a signaling device.
    I would like the transmitter to work off a 3 volt output from a PIR and send a signal to the receiver which operates a buzzer but the output from the receiver is a data signal.
    I have two problems, one with signaling the transmitter and the other is getting the receiver to spit out voltage to operate the buzzer.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/315-433MHZ-...203?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item35e52ce463

    Maybe there's a better option but I like the idea of this long range system.
     
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    hi there KTW

    A PIR is not a transmit device ... it detects an infra red signal, doesn't send one

    what is your definition of long range ?

    Dave
     
  3. KTW

    KTW

    273
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    Feb 22, 2015
    I have a pir that has a 3volt DC output.
    I want it to trigger a transmitter using the 3 volts.
    It would be a wireless alarm.
    Long range would be 200 metres, the problem being that every unit that boasts 200 metres will usually be effective at half that distance in real life.
    Thanks for the quick response.


    Kevin.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 2, 2015
  4. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    show us your PIR
     
  5. KTW

    KTW

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    Feb 22, 2015
  6. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Jun 21, 2012
    The transmitter/receiver combination you anticipate using has a operating frequency (315/433 Mhz ) that is NOT authorized for Region 2, which includes the Americas (North and South), the USA and Canada. See the Wikipedia article.

    A better choice, IMO, would be an XBee Series 1 transceiver operating with 60 mW of transmitter power in the 2.4 GHz ISM band. These devices are not a "turnkey, out-of-the-box" solution. A microprocessor is required at each end of the link along with suitable programming. The upside can be a very secure, long-range, link established with a virtually zero "false alarm" rate caused by interference with other ISM devices such as microwave ovens or other 2.4 GHz ISM band transmitters.

    There is also the possibility of configuring an XBee transmitter/receiver as a "virtual wire" that will simply relay a logic state presented at the transmitter to the remote receiver. This is more in line with your objective, but I think it is short-sighted. Intrusion detection systems should be robust, not easily "spoofed" or defeated by interference. The XBee modules are just one representation of the open-source ZigBee standard, which was designed for remote monitoring of industrial sensors in a wireless networked environment. You don't have to implement a wireless network, but the possibility is "built in" to have multiple inexpensive sensors (PIR or other technology) to identify themselves and wirelessly communicate with "the mother ship".
     
    davenn likes this.
  7. KTW

    KTW

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    Feb 22, 2015
    I appreciate the response but after doing a little research I can easily see where this is beyond my skill level, I was hoping for something out of the box that could be easily adapted to a sensor.
    There are many systems already available but the common problem with all of them is range.
    I have a Chamberlain driveway alert and it works really well but it's limited to distance.
    Thank you for taking the time to explain this.

    Kevin
     
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