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Help with simple circuit

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by repaj, Mar 24, 2015.

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  1. repaj

    repaj

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    Mar 24, 2015
    As you can see from the photo I want to create a circuit where one person clicks a button and on the other end the person will hear a buzzer. However I want this to work from a distance (bottom floor of house to top floor) so how could I make this work e.g. Using the wifi. And what components will I need?
     

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  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    How about a wireless doorbell?
     
    hevans1944 and davenn like this.
  3. repaj

    repaj

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    Mar 24, 2015
    That would be good but I was thinking of making the circuit instead of buying it as an electronics project.
     
  4. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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  5. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    I suspect that is way way too complex for the OP ... especially the rx
     
  6. repaj

    repaj

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    Mar 24, 2015
    I agree with you :) haha
     
  7. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    I would probably go with a pair of arduino pro nanos and low cost 2.4GHz tranciever modules. But although it's easy for me it won't be the same for everyone.
     
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  8. repaj

    repaj

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    Mar 24, 2015
    Thanks steve - ill do that
     
  9. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    If you're going the route of Arduino Pro nano's and NRF24L01+'s then be aware that these Arduinos are not USB programmable (you need a programmer), and you need a 3.3V regulator for the NRF24L01's power supply. The inputs are 5V tolerant, so you don't need to do any level shifting.
     
  10. BobK

    BobK

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    Huh? I find Arduino nano's with USB for as little as 2 bucks on Ebay. Why use one that needs a programmer?

    Bob
     
  11. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Arduino pro nanos are cheaper than arduino nannos. I started using them when both were far more expensive and the absolute price differential was larger. You get a couple more usable IO pins too. But in this case (and considering the current price) an Arduino Nano seems perfectly suited.
     
  12. witsender

    witsender

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    wow. Just wow. $2
     
  13. repaj

    repaj

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    Mar 24, 2015
    Im going to get 2 arduino nanos, a RF 315 Mhz transmitter-receiver module and connect this to 2 9V batteries - do you think that is good?
     
  14. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    I really don't like those 315 MHz modules, but there's no reason they won't work. They also have less software overhead, so they are (in some respects) easier to operate. The drawback is that you need to handle possible interference from other sources of a similar frequency yourself.
     
  15. repaj

    repaj

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    Mar 24, 2015
    What would be a better frequency to use then still with easy setting up?
     
  16. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Like I was said I use the NRF24L01+ modules. They allow you to pick one of 128 channels (from memory) and can be configured so they handle all the required encoding, decoding, error detection, and retries.

    There are libraries which make them pretty simple to use. They operate at 2.4GHz, so they have range limitations like wifi.

    There are more expensive categories with amplifiers and/or external antennas that will give you more range.

    However as I said, the type of module you are looking at will work. If you have problems with interference disrupting the receiver then you can make your code smarter to incorporate coding the signal ago it can be more easily differentiated from noise.
     
  17. witsender

    witsender

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    Dec 12, 2013
    :)
    Then a very big part of using these modules must be knowledge of software packages that emulate radio transmission protocols. Are these software packages pretty user-friendly?

    Mark
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 28, 2015
  18. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Well... They come with simple demos which allow you to set up some very basic comms.

    If you google "nrf24l01+ arduino library" you'll find what you need :)

    If you google "315mhz arduino library" you'll find stuff related to those 315MHz modules. You would probably want to look at "virtualWire" as it seems to incorporate much of the magic you'll need to make it reliable.
     
  19. mdjumethun

    mdjumethun

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    May 27, 2013
    Recently I build same project useing 433Mhz without any microcontroller Or arduino board. @repaj if you want i will give my porject detail.
    -Thank you
     
  20. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    depending on where you are, 433MHz may be even worse for interference as it is
    right at the bottom of an amateur radio band where there are lots of high power transmitters

    2.4GHz is usually the best. Tho there is lots of stuff on 2.4 .... Wi-Fi, BT and all sorts of other stuff
    most of it is lower power short range devices
     
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