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Help to identify this stepper motor

Discussion in 'Datasheets, Manuals and Component Identification' started by mangues, May 29, 2018.

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  1. mangues

    mangues

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    May 29, 2018
    Hello I am a student and I need to carry out a project, but they gave me a stepper motor that indicates 42D2058-01 1.8 / step 2.8ohm on its label, please I need the technical characteristics (voltage, amperage and others), help and thanks
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 30, 2018
  2. Robert_fay

    Robert_fay

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    Jun 15, 2017
    hevans1944 likes this.
  3. mangues

    mangues

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    May 29, 2018
    Thank you very much, Robert_fay, I'm going to do my jobs, I'll tell you when I finish
     
  4. mangues

    mangues

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    May 29, 2018
    I think that if I can use it, if you go to any of those links, there is no specification, thanks to you too
     
  5. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    My bad - hence post removal! Sorry.
     
  6. mangues

    mangues

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    0
    May 29, 2018
    The information you sent belongs to another stepper motor, not the one you requested, but thanks
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 7, 2018
  7. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

    4,275
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    Jun 25, 2010
    We already know the step angle (1.8o).

    The other relevant information is the coil resistance - stepper motors don't always have a 'rated voltage'. Most steppers are driven according to the available supply and the current calculated accordingly.

    From the full spec sheet you can determine the torque etc. but if that isn't available (and there's a 'need to know' requirement) you can take measurements and get them yourself.

    For your stepper of 2.8 ohms, if you drive it at 12V you will get a maximum (stall) coil current of 12/2.8 = 4.2A.

    For fast rotation a higher voltage is usually required.

    Modern integrated stepper driver chips will have all the necessary coil current control circuitry built in and are far easier to use than implementing a driver in discrete (logic) circuitry.

    You should be able to driver the stepper at any reasonable voltage - the amount of torque you get from it is another thing......
     
  8. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,865
    1,956
    Sep 5, 2009
    so specifically … what is different about it compared to your one ??
     
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