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Help needed to identify these components

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by Phippsy, Mar 14, 2017.

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  1. Phippsy

    Phippsy

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    Mar 14, 2017
    IMG_9500.JPG IMG_9495.jpg IMG_9503.JPG Hi, I'm at a loss as to what these 3 items are that I found in a 12v motor that I've taken apart to find out why it won't work, I don't know what they are or how to test them? Any help greatly appreciated
     
  2. debe

    debe

    258
    68
    Oct 15, 2011
    Check the Green object for continuity as its a thermal overload.
     
    Bluejets likes this.
  3. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,709
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    Sep 5, 2009
    first image, the4 yellow thing is a 1uF non polarised monolithic capacitor

    second image is a diode, type unknown ... tell us ALL the markings

    third image, the green thing, best educated guess is that it is a thermal fuse
     
    scanfbla likes this.
  4. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

    2,987
    1,260
    Aug 21, 2015
    Estimating as a 26V transzorb . . . .
    Then there are the two copper wire airwound RFI inductors
    And the1 of 2 sintered bronze bearings /bushings
     
    scanfbla likes this.
  5. Phippsy

    Phippsy

    3
    0
    Mar 14, 2017
    Thanks for the fast and detailed responses, I hope you can help me with a couple more questions.
    I don't have any continuity through the green thing, the thermal overload/fuse, so I would assume that's the reason why the motor doesn't work, any ideas where I would get a replacement, and how would I find the spec it needs to be?
    I don't know how I could test the 1uF non polarised monolithic capacitor, what are the chances that it's failed, what does it do and would it stop the motor from working?
    The diode has the markings BZW 06 26B C046 on it, I think!!! I thought I'd find a silver band at one end, why would I find a diode on a DC motor?
     
  6. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

    2,987
    1,260
    Aug 21, 2015
    You never have told us what this motor is associated with and if there is a labeling that identifies its fractional horsepower , and / or /current consumption concerns or wattage.
    As well, there is quite a large gauge of copper wire that goes over to, and is being spot welded to one connection of the overload protector.
    Zeroing in on the circuit protector might be related to finding more cryptic numbering on other sides. With the shown visible manufacturers proprietary numbering being of minimal help.
    I give your units 1 µF capacitor a 99.86% probability of still being good.
    Using that capacitor as a measuring gauge, it looks like that might have upwards of 1/4 inch motor shaft .
    This cluster of ancillary parts are associated with minimizing radio frequency interference when the brush contacts move between the segments of the rotor as it turns. A much higher voltage than your supply voltage is created at the instant of the opening of a connection between segments .
    Those high voltage spikes need to be absorbed by these components.
    Your found diode is being a bi-directional transient voltage absorber.
    That arc suppression also cuts down on the electro - erosion of the segments of the rotor .
    As things are currently , you need to initially examine the condition of the remaining brushes to see if they will be of adequate remaining length to press firmly into the rotor .

    If I had to test further myself, I would either be placing a large solder blob across the circuit protector terminals, after I got them well tinned, or else use fine bare copper wire from an AC cord to tweezer wrap enough / many turns around to establish a good short across the two contacts , yet not short to anything nearby.
    Next you mechanically reassemble the motor completely .
    Then you hook up power to one lead of the motor and use the other power wire to RAPIDLY brush across the other motor terminal JUST long enough to ascertain which direction the motor is going to turn . Lock that into your neural cache memory.
    Take a DVM . . Or analog meter . . . and set it up for DC current and 10 amps operation and insert its leads in series with one of the power wires.
    Two people should be required to do this, but I have one person ready to make contact with the other wire from the power to the free open motor terminal just after the first person has grasped the motor shaft between thumb and fingers and given it one HARD spin in the earlier ascertained running direction, while applying the SAME voltage polarity to its terminals.
    This minimizes hard start up current, which might exceed 10 amps.
    Do a short analysis on the motor running, to evaluate for jerky operation due to bad winding segments.
    Finding the correct circuit protector would be related to finding it from the manufacturer, or incorporating the current consumption now found to relate to.
    Before there even WERE circuit protectors we would use a twice the normal run current, slow blow fuse externally.
    As best as I can see ,there seems to be no mechanical to thermal coupling considerations inside the motor .

    Thassssit

    73's de Edd
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017
    Phippsy likes this.
  7. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
  8. Bigrockk

    Bigrockk

    17
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    Aug 1, 2016
    A little off topic but:
    I'm not sure what I enjoy more, 73's de Edd's high degree of knowledge or his sense of humor!
    I always seem to find a couple of nuggets of good humor in his posts, thanks for the chuckles 73's de Edd's!
     
  9. Phippsy

    Phippsy

    3
    0
    Mar 14, 2017
    Thanks for the detailed explanation, it's given me a better understanding of it now,
    The motor is for the seat adjustment on a 1992 jaguar, the motor has very little details except the label states it was made by Rockwell international, but I can check the current draw on the other working seat, which should give me an indication of the overload required, the brushes and commutator show virtually no wear so I'm willing to take a risk and replace the overload and reassemble the motor, I only want to do it once!!!
     
  10. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

    2,987
    1,260
    Aug 21, 2015
    Sir Phippsy . . . . . . .

    Wasn't certain, up to this time, if that you just were working with a found motor to get it operational again.
    Now it is seen to be a repair.
    Soooooo . . . . . it looks like you got yerselfs one of those there Oh-Fish-Ull Rockwell Internatioonal Rocket Ejector seats.
    .If your examination revealed the non working unit to be in such good condition, imagine what the passenger
    side motor unit must be in !
    Of course, as owner, you should fully know about the driver side prior utilization.
    Like the frequency of adjustment / use by different drivers . . . . . worst case being a "Fat Albert" driver with the backward repositioning having the unit responding with moanin' n' groanin' . . . . . that later, might be having an effiminate "Olive Oyle" adjusting it full forward.

    If being my units, and having jumpered the bad unit and found the unloading motor pairs running at about the same unloaded current consumption, along with a like observed amount of brush sparkee-sparkee I would rely upon the autos currently installed aluminum link fuse popping for any serious overload.
    AND inter swap the motors positions, as the passenger unit should be almost pristine . . . . unless that pax side got daily use by a rider with OCD.

    73's de Edd
     
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