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HELP needed - NAKAMICHI RX-505 eject bad

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by [email protected], Oct 3, 2007.

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  1. Guest

    I just bought a used Nakamichi RX-505 and it won't eject or auto-
    reverse.
    When I press the button, I can hear it engage and the mechanism
    responds, but no movement.

    I' removed the cover and nothing is showing to be wrong.
    Can anyone help?

    Thanks,
    Terry
     
  2. If it uses a function motor to raise and lower the mech, I would suspect the
    motor is faulty (open internal connection to coils). Seen it before, and the
    fault can be intermittent. Try rotating the motor a bit by hand - it might
    just take off and run for a while.

    As for fixing the motor, that's a tough one but the best "cheat" I've come
    up with is to disconnect the motor wires, loosen the motor from it's mount,
    and apply an external DC voltage of perhaps 6 or 7 volts and let it run for
    at least a couple hours, then reverse polarity and repeat.

    The intermittent internal connections result from years of not much usage.
    Running it continuously seems to fix them - I've not seen any recalls after
    applying this fix. Of course this does NOT apply to shorted motors quite as
    well, but I've not seen these types of motors go shorted.

    I've also seen this work on MR-1 reel motors for example - and it's SO much
    easier than taking out the motor, disassembling it and trying to clean the
    tarnish etc off the commutator and risking physical damage to the brushes
    etc on reassembly.


    Mark Z.
     
  3. JANA

    JANA Guest

    Service the power supply, and check for proper current consumption of the
    scanning output stages, especially the horizontal output stage.

    The clicking you hear is the power start relay cycling, not the degaussing!

    --

    JANA
    _____



    If it uses a function motor to raise and lower the mech, I would suspect the
    motor is faulty (open internal connection to coils). Seen it before, and the
    fault can be intermittent. Try rotating the motor a bit by hand - it might
    just take off and run for a while.

    As for fixing the motor, that's a tough one but the best "cheat" I've come
    up with is to disconnect the motor wires, loosen the motor from it's mount,
    and apply an external DC voltage of perhaps 6 or 7 volts and let it run for
    at least a couple hours, then reverse polarity and repeat.

    The intermittent internal connections result from years of not much usage.
    Running it continuously seems to fix them - I've not seen any recalls after
    applying this fix. Of course this does NOT apply to shorted motors quite as
    well, but I've not seen these types of motors go shorted.

    I've also seen this work on MR-1 reel motors for example - and it's SO much
    easier than taking out the motor, disassembling it and trying to clean the
    tarnish etc off the commutator and risking physical damage to the brushes
    etc on reassembly.


    Mark Z.
     
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