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Help me identify this component!

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by Nerdy_Matt, Dec 29, 2011.

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  1. Nerdy_Matt

    Nerdy_Matt

    8
    0
    Dec 29, 2011
    Hello folks!

    I've been working on some repairs on MacBook and MacBook Pro laptops for awhile now. I'm starting to get farther in depth with my knowledge and now I need a little help. I'm trying to identify a component I've been trying to find a replacement for. I'm attaching a picture of it. It looks like a transistor of some sort, but I'm not sure exactly what. Like I said, just a little green here and Apple doesn't exactly make public the specs on their boards. So, if any of you can help me identify it and source a replacement I'd be most grateful. I'm looking at using one I've pulled from an older MacBook Pro logic board and just seeing what happens, but I'm not wild about that plan. Anyway, input would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance!

    Note: In the image, you'll see two components. One was damaged by corrosion and lacks three pins. The other is the "good" one I pulled off an older MacBook Pro logic board. It is in good shape, but I'm not sure that it is a match for the other one.

    Oh, final note, the original component damaged by corrosion appears to have this marked on it: (man I really need a jewlers loupe)
    1127
    0(?)A1
    6(could be 5 or 8)1DD

    Thanks again!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Resqueline

    Resqueline

    2,848
    2
    Jul 31, 2009
    It seems to be a SOT669 (LFPAK) case.
    If it is a MOSFET the first three pins will be Source and shorted together, the fourth being the Gate. Tab = Drain.
    If so it could be a HAT1127, a 30V 40A 3.6mOhm P-Channel MOSFET.
     
  3. Nerdy_Matt

    Nerdy_Matt

    8
    0
    Dec 29, 2011
    Outstanding!

    Yes, with that info I did a Google search. I'm still having trouble with the specs on these things, but it would seem that the 2165 that I removed from the other MacBook Pro logic board would not be a good choice for replacing this component.

    After googling the information you gave me I found another thread discussing the same component on a liquid damaged Macbook Pro, same as mine. That damn video cable lays over this component so liquid spills tend to hang out and corrode the pins away.

    So folks, where do I go about getting one of these? Without, of course, purchasing a spool of 2500? I do lot's of MacBook Pro repairs, but I don't think I'd ever use that many.

    Thanks again!

    Also, here's a link to the thread I found. Must be the HAT1127H to get nit-picky?
    http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1122338&page=5
     
  4. Nerdy_Matt

    Nerdy_Matt

    8
    0
    Dec 29, 2011
    Oooohhh... I'm kinda screwed aren't I?

    I'm beginning to get the impression that these things are produced to some specific form factor as ordered by the manufacturer. So.. starting to look like my only way to do this is to find another one from another MacBook Pro logic board....

    Say it aint so!!
     
  5. Resqueline

    Resqueline

    2,848
    2
    Jul 31, 2009
    The HAT2165 seems to be an N-channel so that is not an option. N-channels are plentiful btw..
    P-channels in that package seems to be almost as rare as hens teeth (but we can't give up just yet).
    I found only these (identical) P-channels, but they're not in stock, you'd have to enquire.
    HAT1072H, a 30V 40A 5.3mOhm logic level P-Channel MOSFET.
    HAT1127H, a 30V 40A 5.3mOhm logic level P-Channel MOSFET.

    These are the package names I've found referenced to these devices: SOT669, MO-235, LFPAK, & Power-SO8.
    Here are some compatible/similar package types that could be possible to solder to the same PCB footprint:
    NXP; LFPAK (SOT669 & SOT1023)
    Infineon; PG-TDSON-8
    Fairchild; Power 56
    Vishay; PowerPAK SO-8
    NEC; 8-pin HVSON
    ON Semi; SO−8 FL
    STM; PowerFLAT (6x5)
    Renesas; LFPAK

    You could perhaps use an ordinary SO-8 instead, like the Vishay Si4459ADY (30V 23A 6.2mOhm) or the Si4497DY (30V 29A 3.8mOhm).

    All resistances and currents mentioned in this post refers to a gate voltage of 4.5V & 25 deg. C, and are typical values.
     
  6. Nerdy_Matt

    Nerdy_Matt

    8
    0
    Dec 29, 2011
    Thank you for your help! I'll have to check on some of those, but for now I think I may end up pulling it from another non-working MacBook Pro board (yes a third board, but this one is identical to the one I'm working on). I was trying to get this board up, but it just shuts down right in the middle of the chime. I'm going to poke around it a little more but if nothing works out I'll try to rob it of it's HAT1127 to see if I can get this board up.

    Thanks again!
     
  7. Nerdy_Matt

    Nerdy_Matt

    8
    0
    Dec 29, 2011
    Oh double Drats!

    Upon closer inspection of the board needing the HAT1127 it has a few other resistors and components fried. I guess I'll get plenty of practice fixing that one.

    The second board still appears to be undamaged upon visual inspection but still won't boot. Lucky me, I have a schematic for it. Unlucky me, it's 96 pages and might as well be written in Latin. Baptism by fire it is.

    I guess I'll be doing some heavy testing on that board. I have all the equipment I need, so if anyone wants to give me some pointers on reading that schematic and testing, that would be great, but I know I'm starting out pretty green here and I don't expect someone to hold my hand the whole way, but if anyone likes teaching I'm an open book!

    Thanks again for all your help!
     
  8. Nerdy_Matt

    Nerdy_Matt

    8
    0
    Dec 29, 2011
    Maybe I meant to say blank open book...
     
  9. Resqueline

    Resqueline

    2,848
    2
    Jul 31, 2009
    Fault-finding non-booting computer boards is definately not the easiest task around (and not my strongest point) but I can help read schematics & suggest how to test.
     
  10. Nerdy_Matt

    Nerdy_Matt

    8
    0
    Dec 29, 2011
    If you don't mind that would be fantastic!

    I'm going to start trying to figure this one out myself as well, but it will definitely help to have some guidance. I downloaded the schematic here:

    http://www.2shared.com/file/woR7wLVv/Apple_Macbook_PRO_A1286__Late_.html

    Whatever pointers you can provide would be very helpful. I'll just be poking around trying to get one of these up. I still think this half chime board is more likely to work again given the burnt resistors and such on the other board. Not that I couldn't replace those, but if I don't half to solder sesame seed sized components I'll avoid it!

    Thanks again. I'm really looking to become a bit of an expert on these boards since it's gradually becoming a nice little second income for me, and since I now have the time and opportunity to go farther in depth with testing as well as the equipment to do it with, I'm looking forward to learning some new skills.

    Anyway, there is the schematic. I can provide photos of the board upon request if you find it helpful.

    Once again, thank your for your patience and all your help!
     
  11. Nerdy_Matt

    Nerdy_Matt

    8
    0
    Dec 29, 2011
    Minor update, I just checked the resistors that appeared burned on visual inspection. Turns out they're ok. They just have gunk on them from the speaker assembly that was held on over them with a black adhesive pad so I may be looking into placing the good HAT1127 on that board after all.
     
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