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Help identify a resistor without bands

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by KilgoreCemetery, Nov 2, 2017.

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  1. KilgoreCemetery

    KilgoreCemetery

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    Apr 12, 2017
    Could somebody please help me identify some specifics about this resistor? I know that it's 0.1 Ohms, but is it wirewound or metal oxide? Is it fire resistant or water proof? That sort of stuff.

    If it helps, it's pulled from a Rockford Fosgate T8004 amplifier and was located just in front of the MOSFETs on the circuit board. I've looked for a schematic, but so far, no dice.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    Wire wound, 5W would be my guess.

    Any offers?
     
    hevans1944 likes this.
  3. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    Sounds reasonable. Power could be a tad less, impossible to say from the picture.
    Although the thick coating doesn't allow to see the structure typical for wire wound resistors.
    Most likely neither fire proof nor water resistant

    The letter 'J' likewise indicates a tolerance of +-5%.

    Probably any resistor of similar size and value will suit for replacement, if necessary.
     
    davenn and KilgoreCemetery like this.
  4. KilgoreCemetery

    KilgoreCemetery

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    Apr 12, 2017
    I knew the J stood for something, but I couldn't for the life of me remember what. Thanks, Harald!

    Thanks for the info, Kelly! What do you mean by offers?
     
  5. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Difference of opinion..... Harald's offer was a good one - I'd 'take it'.
     
  6. dorke

    dorke

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    Jun 20, 2015
    Most probably a Flame-proof/Flame-resistant resistor.
    A "safety part" common in high wattage/current amps.
    Should not catch fire when current exceeds high value on fault conditions.
    Wattage depends on size(?),could be 3W.
    Like this one
    Any other writing on it?

    Don't replace it with a "regular" resistor,it is a safety part!!!
    Noname.jpg
     
  7. KilgoreCemetery

    KilgoreCemetery

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    Apr 12, 2017
    Ah, I wondered if it was going to have some safety specs with it. The replacement I ordered was listed as "Flame Retardant Coating, Safety". It's a 3W and very similar in size to the original. Hopefully that covers it :eek:

    No other writing. Just the same thing printed three different times
     
  8. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

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    I'll go for metal film element construction and stay at 2-3 Watt until you put in a side by side dime for size comparison . . . .or a penny . . . . if you are presently being hard up .
     
  9. KilgoreCemetery

    KilgoreCemetery

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    Apr 12, 2017
    I'm definitely hard up, but my calipers are paid off. I'm getting about 15mm x 5.5mm, not including the leads
     
  10. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

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    Aug 21, 2015
    In that case . . . . . make it 2 watt.
     
  11. bushtech

    bushtech

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    Apologies for chipping in: If you need say a 2W resistor and you can only find a 3W version, is that OK to use?
     
  12. dorke

    dorke

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    Jun 20, 2015
    @bushtech
    Yes, generally it is.

    Except when the resistor is used as a fuse in the circuit,in this case use only the same wattage.
    Such as fusible resistors.
     
    KilgoreCemetery likes this.
  13. bushtech

    bushtech

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    Sep 13, 2016
    Great! Thanks dorke.
     
  14. KilgoreCemetery

    KilgoreCemetery

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    Apr 12, 2017
    Thanks for the help guys!
     
  15. KilgoreCemetery

    KilgoreCemetery

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    Apr 12, 2017
    I was referencing this post when I realized that your reply included a link to a page that goes into more detail about resistor Letter and Digit Codes. Very helpful! I almost confused a 3WR27ΩK as 27 kilo ohm, instead of 27 ohm with ±10%
     
  16. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

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    Aug 21, 2015
    NOW . . . . . . how about REALLY breaking that serial info down and actually coming out with . . . . . .
    3W for 3 watts
    R for being the position of a decimal place
    Then that collectively becomes decimal 27 ohms
    .27 ohms
    And then the final K relates its 10% tolerance.
    All of that is then amalgamated as being a 3 watt .27 ohm 10% tolerance resistor.
     
    KilgoreCemetery likes this.
  17. Victor james

    Victor james

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    Jul 28, 2018
    Does anybody know what make that resistor is and where do you buy them I have the same problem
     
  18. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

    3,085
    1,302
    Aug 21, 2015
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