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Help - I can't solder tiny resistors!

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Dantanna, Jan 31, 2005.

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  1. Dantanna

    Dantanna Guest

    I was trying to move a couple of SMD resistors and I am having a heck of a
    time getting them soldered to a mobo. Can you guys please pass along some
    tips if you have them? Or a website?
    Thanks -
     
  2. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Mobo? Oh, you mean motherboard.

    1) Remove the solder from both pads on the pcb.
    2) Add a little solder to one pad.
    3) Using a tweezer, hold the resistor over the pads, and heat one end of the
    resistor and the pad with the solder on it. The resistor should be lying
    flush to your mobo, now.
    4) Solder the second end of the resistor to its pad. Don't leave the
    soldering iron on this pad for too long or the entire resistor may become
    unsoldered (and it may stick to the iron's tip).
    5) Add solder to the first end/pad to make sure there's enough on it and
    that it's soldered well. Don't leave the soldering iron on this pad for too
    long or the entire resistor may become unsoldered (and it may stick to the
    iron's tip).

    Follow this technique and you should have a crumulently-soldered mobo
    resistor, mofo.

    Bob
     
  3. Guest

    Once the component has been placed on the pads I discard the tweezers
    and then use something like a scriber to apply gentle pressure in the
    middle of the component. The iron is then applied fairly rapidly to
    the ends alternately, repeating if necessary. If done correctly the
    solder at both ends will still be molten and the gentle pressure
    assures that the component sits closely on the pads.
     
  4. Dmitri

    Dmitri Guest

    Dantanna wrote:


    For what it's worth, here is my 2 cents:

    Apply soldering flux generously to and around both pads. Using the
    tweezers, position the resistor so that the ends are on the pads. Then let
    go on the tweezers, and, given enough flux, the resistor will stay put.
    Squeeze your tweezers then and use them to push the resistor down so it
    does not slide. Gather a bit of solder on the iron and apply to one end,
    then gather more and apply to another. This works down to 0603 size or
    maybe even smaller, depending on how steady your hands are. 0805 and 1206
    are rather easily done this way. I personally can’t get past 0603, and I
    tend not to use anything smaller than 0805 if there is any chance.

    Flux will get messy after you are done, but it is essential to have lots
    of it, so, if you want your MOBO look as if it's just left the factory,
    dissolve the remaining flux with alcohol. Use a brush for that.


    --
    Dmitri Abaimov, RCDD
    http://www.cabling-design.com
    Cabling Forum, color codes, pinouts and other useful resources for
    premises cabling users and pros
    http://www.cabling-design.com/homecabling
    Residential Cabling Guide
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  5. Dantanna

    Dantanna Guest

    Thanks for the tips peeps! I will give it a try again tonite. Another tip
    I heard was the use of a thick flux or a tiny dab of glue to hold the
    resistor in place prior to soldering it.
     
  6. Art

    Art Guest

    Another technique is to place the new smd device on a piece of scotch tape,
    exposing one end of it. Clean the pads of old solder and residue, tin the
    pads with new solder and a bit of flux. Solder the free end of the smd
    device to the pad, the heat will tend to release the device from the scotch
    tape. Hold it in position and solder the other end. Also works fine with smd
    transistors.
     
  7. Bob

    Bob Guest

    "it's" = "it is", or "it has"
    "its" is for everything else.

    I knew you really wanted to know.

    :)

    Bob
     
  8. Clarence_A

    Clarence_A Guest


    Top poster PLONKED!
     
  9. Jim Douglas

    Jim Douglas Guest

    place component, take a little scotch tape and take it's ass down! solder,
    remove tape, move to next component
     
  10. Jim Douglas

    Jim Douglas Guest

    Thanks, I suck at those little things like that! Now how to remember this
    when the brain is so full of other stuff, I will have to make space for this
    information by removing something else, it's not working.
     
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