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Hazards of repair

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by bob urz, Jan 1, 2010.

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  1. bob urz

    bob urz Guest

  2. root

    root Guest

    At one point the article cited says electricity doesn't give any
    warning. It has always been my experience that I can very lightly touch
    and move my finger over a hot chassis and feel a sort of vibration. I
    never got a shock doing that.
     
  3. Yes, in fact, not even just a hot chassis, but any equipment that has
    RFI filters and doesn't have its case grounded.

    P.S. The hot chassis thing assumes you don't have your other hand on a
    ground! It would very likely be more than a vibration in that case. :( :)

    P.S.2 This is also the reason you can use a common neon tester to check
    for live wires without having to connect the other probe to Neutral or
    Ground.

    --
    sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ: http://www.repairfaq.org/
    Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/
    +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://www.repairfaq.org/sam/lasersam.htm
    | Mirror Sites: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/F_mirror.html

    Important: Anything sent to the email address in the message header above is
    ignored unless my full name AND either lasers or electronics is included in the
    subject line. Or, you can contact me via the Feedback Form in the FAQs.
     
  4. N_Cook

    N_Cook Guest

    Are you related to this guy?
    The Radioactive Boy Scout: The True Story of a Boy Who Built a Nuclear
    Reactor in His Shed
    "
    David Hahn, a boy scout, wanted to earn his science merit badge. He could
    have done an experiment with bicarbonate of soda, like most other kids. But
    he didn't. He built a nuclear reactor in his shed instead.David Hahn's
    gospel was The Golden Book of Chemistry Experiments. While his friends were
    learning to play baseball or dreaming of owning their first car, David was
    in the middle of an increasingly hazardous trail of chemical experiments.
    Moving on from routine explosions that forced his work from his bedroom to
    the garden shed, David quickly determined to build a nuclear reactor. For
    this he had to make a neutron gun, dupe officials at the Nuclear Regulatory
    Commission to provide him with information and imitate a professor of
    nuclear physics in order to obtain purified radioactive elements, all of
    which he did.David, sporting a gas mask for protection, took to the potting
    shed with his ever more unstable and dangerous load. His diligence and
    ultimate success triggered the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan:
    a team of men in moon suits who deconstructed the shed and loaded it and all
    its contents into steel drums emblazoned with radioactive warning signs.
    This is a true story. Through it, man's innocent obsession and fatal
    engagement with nuclear reactivity is told with surreal wonder.
    "
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1841152293?ie=UTF8&tag=zoonomian-21&linkC
    ode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=1841152293
     
  5. There's some fantastic photos of those on the web. I don't care how
    safe they are; I'd be very reluctant to go near one, operating or not.
     
  6. GregS

    GregS Guest

    I routinly check any centrifuge I work on.

    I found my old pentax lens had a high count from its uranium ore coatings.

    I remember well the radioactive static eliminators.

    greg
     
  7. Adrian C

    Adrian C Guest

  8. Some good demos of working ones at YouTube:



     
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