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Guitar static modulation morse transmitter--will my amp blow up?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by dietermoreno, Mar 7, 2013.

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  1. dietermoreno

    dietermoreno

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    Dec 30, 2012
    Guitar static modulation morse transmitter--will my amp blow up?

    I want to discover the magic of resonance and recreate the wireless telegraphy era.

    I have a whimsical question: what if I connected my guitar to the high current low impedence output jack of my guitar amp instead of the low current high impedence input jack of my guitar amp and connected the amp input to a cable which the cable is connected to nothing providing a steady stream of static and I connected an effects pedal to the static supply so I could turn the static on and off in morse code?

    Have I described building a radio transmitter that uses static on and off to transmit morse code?

    Would the pickups generate electromagnetic frequency instead of receive radio interference (the reverse of what they do when the guitar is connected to the input jack of the amp)?

    Wouldn't supplying high current through the pickups generate a magnetic field in the pickups that is perpendicular to the current flowing through the inductors, thus creating an electromagnetic wave whose frequency may be determined by how many coils the pickup selector switch has selected?


    Enough with the whimsical questions, the more practical question is: will this experiment blow up my amp due to the high current arcing across the thin gauge wires inside the guitar causing the amp to short circuit?

    If I use my tube amp for this experiment, will that be safer than a solid state amp because I think a tube amp can handle higher current, the tubes can easily be replaced and screwed back into the socket by any idiot with no electronics knowledge, and all of the components in a tube amp are discrete components so no arcing across IC boards?

    Don't worry, I wouldn't use any guitar I like for this experiment, I would be using a Fender Squire that only cost $80 with First Act strings that is in the corner collecting dust and has been for about 5 years since I upgraded to better guitars. Read as: I don't care about its musical capabilities (it has almost none), I only care about stealing its circuit components for my experiment.
     
  2. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    Most likely the guitar pickup is much higher impedance than a speaker, so it will not blow up your amp.

    If you play music through the amp, outputting it to the guitar pickup, at high enough volume, it should make your strings vibrate. But there is no RF involved, so no, it will not transmit anything.

    Bob
     
  3. dietermoreno

    dietermoreno

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    Dec 30, 2012
    That's good that it won't blow up my amp, because I don't want to buy replacement tubes.

    That's cool that you can make your guitar pickup and strings function as a speaker if you connect your guitar backwards.

    but it would only function as a speaker and no RF would be generated?

    If connected the normal way the guitar pickups can receive RF interference, then wouldn't logic say that connecting the guitar pickups backwards with the amp would generate RF?

    Or does it not work that way and its more complicated?
     
  4. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    It does not work that way. In order to transmit, you have to produce RF. There is nothing in a guitar amp the produces RF.

    Bob
     
  5. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    It's almost as logical as asking "If a really strong wind can push my car off a bridge, can I create a really strong wind by driving my car off a cliff?"
     
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