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Guitar pedal customization

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Spectrum90, Nov 19, 2015.

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  1. Spectrum90

    Spectrum90

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    Nov 19, 2015
    I have an interesting question this is my first post hopefully this is the right place to ask it. The other day my overdrive pedal battery died, but as it was giving me the last of its juice, something interesting happened. It produced a very different distortion effect than its normally gritty sound. It was thick and blended in a very desirable manner. This only happened for a few seconds and then it wouldn't have enough power to push the signal through. My question is, how can I reproduce this with a full battery? A friend suggested wiring up a dimmer switch used in lighting. Any thoughts? Thanks in advance for any responses they are greatly appreciated
     
  2. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    Dec 18, 2013
    Hello. A simple resistor in line with the power wire might be all you need. What model of pedal is it? A couple of other things to note is that as the battery discharges as normal, with this modification you may find it stops working sooner than before. Also if you have other controls on the unit they may not function as before.
    Adam
     
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  3. Spectrum90

    Spectrum90

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    Nov 19, 2015
    Thanks, I have two different pedals and I have noticed this in both of them. One is a Danaelectro overdrive and the other is Danaelectro Cool cat metal. The controls on the pedals are a simple eq, a volume, and drive.
     
  4. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    Dec 18, 2013
    You could use a variable resistor or a cheap resistance block like this to try some different values. It would be good to know what current the unit draws when in use. I think it's quite low, I never measured any of mine when I used to play guitar.
    https://www.sparkfun.com/products/13006
     
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  5. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

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    May 12, 2015
    Hi spectrum,
    can you replicate this every time the battery is low?
    I have also noticed this when my son used a phone charger instead of the power supply for the pedal.
    It only lasted a second or two though.
    I think Adam has a good idea how to replicate it!!

    Martin
     
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  6. Spectrum90

    Spectrum90

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    Nov 19, 2015
    Yes but I'm talking super low. Enough power to turn on the light but the second you start to play the light dims and the sound slowly drowns out. My amp also had the same effect when I turn it off. As the power is drained from (I'm assuming) the capacitors the sound becomes very fuzzy. I love the sound it creates
     
  7. Spectrum90

    Spectrum90

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    Nov 19, 2015
    Thanks dude! I'll look into this Adam. I wish I knew more about how the pedals worked I would love to build my own
     
  8. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    Dec 18, 2013
    I'll see if I can find the website I used to use that had lots of circuit diagrams for pedals.
     
  9. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    Dec 18, 2013
  10. Alec_t

    Alec_t

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    Jul 7, 2015
    An adjustable voltage regulator (LM317-based?) might be useful to give you the effect you want.
     
  11. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    Dec 18, 2013
    Yep another good one Alec!
    Adam
     
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