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Guitar Output Voltage

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Lost'n Found, Nov 20, 2006.

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  1. Lost'n Found

    Lost'n Found Guest

    Hello

    The datasheets for EMG81 pickups say that the output voltage signal is 1v
    RMS.

    However, when I connect the guitar to the oscilloscope and play, I read
    something like 20mv peak!

    The input impedance of the scope is 1M.

    Is that normal?

    I tried this with different pickups, and I also get very small signal, not
    like the datasheets. Something in the rage of 10mv peak.

    The pickups are connected in the guitar, and I measure the signal when I hit
    a string with a pick with moderate power.

    Thanks
     
  2. Boris Mohar

    Boris Mohar Guest


    Those active pickups, which implies that there is a gain stage built in.



    Regards,

    Boris Mohar

    Got Knock? - see:
    Viatrack Printed Circuit Designs (among other things) http://www.viatrack.ca

    void _-void-_ in the obvious place
     
  3. Genome

    Genome Guest

    If Boris of the coat of MoHair is right about them being activated...
    perhaps that is their maximum before 'clipping' output based on what they
    have as batteries and the electyronics in them. Like if they run on two
    button cells then that's about 3V or +/-1.5V which is about 1V RMS.

    I suppose that if you tweakle the pickyup things really close to the stringy
    things then give it a good one then you won't get there either...

    Anyway.... Wot you need to doo is.... DOOOOOOO YOU WANT TO HEAR MY NEW TUNE?

    I HAVE COMPOSED IT USING ANVIL STUDIO BUT PEOPLE AROUND HERE ARE COMPLAINING
    EVERY TIME I PLAY IT BECAUSE THEY CAN NOT ADMIT IT IS REALLY GOOD.

    Fancy having to live life with an ego problem.

    DNA
     
  4. Lost'n Found

    Lost'n Found Guest

    Let me rephrase the question:

    The scope reads 20mv, not 1v. I based the design on the assumption that
    signal is about 500mV. Turns out it is 1 decade below that!

    Sorry for the inconvenience.
     
  5. Boris Mohar

    Boris Mohar Guest

    Boost it with this. Found about it yesterday. I couldn't play a instrument
    to save my life but my daughter is pretty hot.

    http://www.stick.com/
    http://www.stick.com/onlinevideos/
    http://www.stick.com/onlinevideos/lorientestgrand.html

    Than if you run out of stings there is
    http://warrguitars.com/WarrRSS/Warr Guitars.html

    Past that you are into dulcimer and harp.
     
  6. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    Yes.

    The 1 Volt probably refers to sum hypothetical metal-rock guitarist's idea of
    playing.

    Graham
     
  7. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Lost'n Found"

    ** A bit more actually.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EMG_81



    ** Then you must be playing a single string, quite softly and the PU is
    fitted a long way from the strings.


    ** Try strumming a full chord fairly hard - then you should see levels of
    about 1 volt rms.

    The dynamic range of an electric guitar is rather large.

    BTW

    You sure your control pots are wired right and are the correct values?




    ......... Phil
     
  8. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Approx. 20 mV output is perfectly normal for a guitar pickup. To get
    1V, you need a preamp, which might or might not be embedded in the
    pickup - if it is, then the pickup will need a separate power supply
    to run the preamp.

    Hope This Heps!
    RIch
     
  9. ehsjr

    ehsjr Guest

    According to Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickup_(music)#Output
    "The output voltage of pickups varies between 100 mV rms to
    over 1 V rms for some of the higher output types."

    Ed
     
  10. Only if you crank the volume up to eleven. ;-)
     
  11. John G

    John G Guest

    Do you have a good battery in the pickup.
    It has an amplifier built in to achieve over 1 volt.

    Google is your friend.

    http://emginc.com/downloads/wiringdiagrams/Humbuckers_active.pdf

    John G.
     
  12. joseph2k

    joseph2k Guest

    it is very reasonable to have a signal level during the sustain part of the
    waveform for a plucked instrument. The few cycle amplitude for design _is_
    about 1 V. The amplitude spec includes the transient part of the waveform
    for very good reason. ordinary musical instrument dynamics exceed 20 dB,
    guitars and violins easily exceed 30 dB not counting attack transients.
    The specification includes attack transients, that is why it is 14 dB
    higher than the relative steady state signals you measured.
     
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