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Grounding and lightning.

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Skybuck Flying, May 15, 2011.

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  1. Hello,

    Hopefully this will be my last question to "research" and determine if I
    want to ground my hardware.

    What happens if lightning strikes near the ground wire ?!?

    (I have seen lightning strike closeby a couple of times so it's a realistic
    scenerio).

    Could this be a reason for people to unplug their systems ?!?

    What if systems are not grounded ?!? Is the risk for equipment damage lower
    when lightning strikes ?

    If systems are grounded is their lightning strike danger for human
    fatalities ?!?
    For example: I touch PC chasis or something and boom lightning strikes...
    could that kill me ?! ;) :) =D
    Or perhaps it will even come at me through the air from pc to me ?! ;)

    I guess the power room contains stuff to prevent such situations but are
    they generally enough ?!?

    I guess all this stuff needs to be checked by specialist which I might call
    soon ;)

    He gonna have a tough customer with me ! ;) =D

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
     
  2. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Ground your fucking hardware already, and shut up about it!
     
  3. mike

    mike Guest

    Lightning goes where it wants to go.
    No amount of grounding thru wire you can bend is gonna help.
    DO NOT TOUCH anything when there's a lightning strike.
    And ground equipment according to the manufacturer's instructions.
    And yes, you worry too much.
     
  4. FatBytestard

    FatBytestard Guest

    No. He BREAKS things by TOUCHING them, and the dumbass cannot keep his
    grubby fat little fingers off of anything he buys, and he thinks that
    taking it apart makes him knowledgeable about what makes it operate.

    And THEN, the dopey dumbfuck wants to blame the makers of the products
    for his abject stupidity, and refuses to believe us when we tell him that
    it was HE that broke his gear. He is absolutely as clueless as it gets.
     
  5. Hmm...

    I come across this message:

    "Lightning and "Surge Protectors"

    http://community.discovery.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/9701967776/m/7041960579?r=2791922579#2791922579

    Message content:

    "
    I recently had to replace my computer due to a nearby lightning strike. The
    computer was off but still plugged in. The surge protector was unaffected,
    but now the computer will not boot up. The hard drive is turning, the LED's
    are lit, but nothing from the comuter to the monitor. Even hitting the off
    button has no effect. I'm guessing that stray currents got into the
    motherboard and cooked something. Any ideas if the computer is toast or can
    it be fixed?
    "

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
     
  6. Another interesting story:

    "

    When I worked several months in Bavaria, I lived in a small flat in a remote
    village.
    The power lines run from house to house on the roof. It happens very often
    that this line is hit and destroys devices. The Villagers unplug everything
    and leave the lights (bulbs, not CFLs) on to minimize the damage. But it
    happens often that something wasn't unplugged and became destroyed.

    Since I am an electronics engineer, the old lady who owned the house asked
    why she never had any broken devices. Her neighbours often complained about
    broken stuff, but she never had any problems. First, I couldn't explain it
    until...:
    One day I went down into the cellar to wash my laundry, I noticed a
    transparent plastic cap in the sink. The old lady insists on operating the
    machine since she never trusts anybody to do it correct. After she started
    the washing machine I showed her this plastic cap. Se told me that it
    belongs to the emergency light next to the fuse box. She had someone
    installed it because she was afraid of a broken bulb and might fall down the
    stairs. It was a small neon bulb as used in switches as indicator. She told
    me that the cap of the light sometimes lands in the sink.
    When I installed the transparent plastic lid, I noticed that glass of the
    bulb was very darkened.
    And this was the explanation. When a lightning hits the power line, the bulb
    acts as a spark gap and limits the power surge in her house. The sudden heat
    of the bulb blasts of that plastic cover. This emergency light acted as a
    simple surge protector which helped protecting her devices! It was installed
    between phase and ground (not neutral) and tripped the residual-current
    device whenever it ignited during a power surge.
    This thing was nothing but an "accidental" home-made surge protector!
    "

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
     
  7. Another interesting story, death included :):

    "
    Neither talking on a land line phone nor taking a shower increases the
    chances of lightning directly hitting your house BUT, as yuandrew said, both
    of these activities do increase your chance of injury or death should a
    direct hit happen. In fact, 1 to 2 people a year are killed by lightning, in
    the U.S. while talking on a wired phone inside a building. The number
    injured is much higher. Wireless phones and cell phones are safe.
    "

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
     
  8. Shaun

    Shaun Guest

    "Skybuck Flying" wrote in message

    Hello,

    Hopefully this will be my last question to "research" and determine if I
    want to ground my hardware.

    What happens if lightning strikes near the ground wire ?!?

    (I have seen lightning strike closeby a couple of times so it's a realistic
    scenerio).

    Could this be a reason for people to unplug their systems ?!?

    What if systems are not grounded ?!? Is the risk for equipment damage lower
    when lightning strikes ?

    If systems are grounded is their lightning strike danger for human
    fatalities ?!?
    For example: I touch PC chasis or something and boom lightning strikes...
    could that kill me ?! ;) :) =D
    Or perhaps it will even come at me through the air from pc to me ?! ;)

    I guess the power room contains stuff to prevent such situations but are
    they generally enough ?!?

    I guess all this stuff needs to be checked by specialist which I might call
    soon ;)

    He gonna have a tough customer with me ! ;) =D

    Bye,
    Skybuck.


    I would recommend for you to get a long metal rod, go outside on a stormy
    night away from trees and hold the rod up as high as you can, then just
    stand there and wait. You'll do us all a favor.

    Shaun
     
  9. RoyLFuchs

    RoyLFuchs Guest


    This cannot be a story about you, because there is no way in hell that
    someone as stupid as you are is an electrical engineer.
     
  10. Bob F

    Bob F Guest

    FWIW, I was talking on the phone once with a neighbor when lightening struck. We
    both heard the CLAP, but she received a significant shock. Funny thing, but for
    several days, her hearing was ultra sensative - she could hear really well.

    I checked the wiring for the phone line coming into their house, and discovered
    that when some plumbing work had been previously done, the ground wire for the
    phone system had been removed from the water pipe at the hose bibb. That was why
    she got shocked.
     
  11. Paul

    Paul Guest

    I'd say, she was pretty lucky. It could have been a lot worse.

    Paul
     
  12. Bob F

    Bob F Guest

    She was NOT happy about it.
     
  13. Provide some certs, clown. I'd love to see who gave *you* a diploma.

    Kinda sorta explains the whole thing. I did start college as an EE back
    in 1968, but didn't finish the 1st quarter. "Uncle Sam" changed my
    plans... but I did have about a 3.2 GPA for what time I did have.

    "Unca Sam" (USAF) did teach me what I didn't know already, but I'd
    already decided that I'd be happier as a tech.

    It's quite funny how "engineers" get treated in hi-tech. Unless proven
    otherwise, management won't let them touch tools, test equipment, or
    even product. They have a qualified tech do that for them. I spent
    thousands of hours playing "voice-controlled scope-probe
    operator(VCSPO)" supporting engineers.

    One of my favorite memories was doing prototype tech on a severely
    complicated power supply for "Secure Voice Comm" for US Navy submarines
    back in 1983. Things weren't(as usual in proto) going well, so I'd spent
    about 30 hours of VCSPO with one particular engineer.
    Said engineer suddenly got this funny "glazed eye" look, stood up, and
    screamed

    (drumroll)
    "I designed THIS? It's a mind ****!!"
    (20 seconds of dead silence, then applause (mostly vulgar))

    I'm not knocking ALL engineers, but I've seen far too many that think
    and act like SkyBuck. When they don't have a practical background to
    work from, they drag out all the "oo-wee-oo" crap to explain it away.



    --
    "Shit this is it, all the pieces do fit.
    We're like that crazy old man jumping
    out of the alleyway with a baseball bat,
    saying, "Remember me motherfucker?"
    Jim “Dandy” Mangrum
     
  14. Where did I write that...

    If I did write that somewhere then it:

    1. Either wasn't me.

    or

    2. I ment software engineer ! ;) =D

    or

    3. I was just having fun with my hardware ! ;) =D

    Bye,
    Skybuck =D

    "Nobody > (Revisited)" wrote in message



    Provide some certs, clown. I'd love to see who gave *you* a diploma.

    Kinda sorta explains the whole thing. I did start college as an EE back
    in 1968, but didn't finish the 1st quarter. "Uncle Sam" changed my
    plans... but I did have about a 3.2 GPA for what time I did have.

    "Unca Sam" (USAF) did teach me what I didn't know already, but I'd
    already decided that I'd be happier as a tech.

    It's quite funny how "engineers" get treated in hi-tech. Unless proven
    otherwise, management won't let them touch tools, test equipment, or
    even product. They have a qualified tech do that for them. I spent
    thousands of hours playing "voice-controlled scope-probe
    operator(VCSPO)" supporting engineers.

    One of my favorite memories was doing prototype tech on a severely
    complicated power supply for "Secure Voice Comm" for US Navy submarines
    back in 1983. Things weren't(as usual in proto) going well, so I'd spent
    about 30 hours of VCSPO with one particular engineer.
    Said engineer suddenly got this funny "glazed eye" look, stood up, and
    screamed

    (drumroll)
    "I designed THIS? It's a mind ****!!"
    (20 seconds of dead silence, then applause (mostly vulgar))

    I'm not knocking ALL engineers, but I've seen far too many that think
    and act like SkyBuck. When they don't have a practical background to
    work from, they drag out all the "oo-wee-oo" crap to explain it away.



    --
    "Shit this is it, all the pieces do fit.
    We're like that crazy old man jumping
    out of the alleyway with a baseball bat,
    saying, "Remember me motherfucker?"
    Jim “Dandy” Mangrum
     
  15. Martin Brown

    Martin Brown Guest

    That is unusual. People that have been very close to a lightening strike
    usually find that their ears ring for a couple of hours maybe longer and
    take a while to recover. Our building with a large metal roof took a
    direct hit that went down the phone lines - turned out later someone had
    nicked the exterior copper lightning conductor.

    All that was left was a charred blackened mess on the wall where the
    phone trunking had been and into the switchboard. The switchboard girls
    were very upset, in tears and initially quite deaf. Building lost power
    too. Damage was mostly confined to the vertical path of the arc. It was
    a very big bang for everyone in the building but must have been
    absolutely terrifying in the small reception and switchboard room.
    Local ground wire for a domestic phone?

    I have once had a minor belt off my terrestrial TV roof aerial lead
    whilst rewiring it to take a satellite dish feed. There was enough
    static HT on it to light a neon screwdriver - a storm was coming but I
    didn't know that at the time. Careless not to have checked first.

    Regards,
    Martin Brown
     
  16. Guest

    The last 10 years I was in IBM, technicians were more rare than hen's teeth.
    There had been a steady downward path in that direction for the last 25 or so
    years. It started with, "any engineer worth his pay can do technician work",
    through "if I can hire one person, do I want an engineer or a technician" (see
    above), to "there isn't any more work for technicians - you're all laid off".
    As long as they don't make me use that commie solder! I refuse, which gets me
    out of working on manufacturing problems and customer equipment. ;-)
    Nope. I wouldn't work there.
    I don't have a "bench". There are benches where I camp out, but it isn't in
    any way assigned to me and I'm usually working between someone else's junk.
    I'm really the only one who does any design anymore, too. The firmware types
    work in their cubes/office.
     
  17. Guest

    Better; bump it off the table and see which way he moves.
     
  18. Guest

    Cream.
     
  19. Guest

    There's the door. ;-)
     
  20. Guest

    Let it fall, then pick it up *after* you've figured out which end is the cold
    end. ;-)
     
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