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graphic LCDs

Discussion in 'Electronic Components' started by Andrew R Mitz, Aug 21, 2003.

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  1. I have used character-based LCDs for a number of embedded designs (e.g. 2
    lines x 16 characters), but have never used a graphics LCD. There seem to
    be two basic types, parallel and serial. I think I am interested in a
    serial version. I don't want to do fancy windowing on the display. I
    would like multiple fonts and perhaps a bar or line graph. The display
    size should support the equivalent of 8 lines by 40 characters.
    Questions:
    1) Where do I find specs for the controllers used in these displays?
    2) Can you suggest a display to start with (for learning).
    3) Is there a good book or web site that provides programming information
    and examples? My current favorite processor is a Rabbit, but I can read
    almost any code.
    4) Any suggestions, tricks, gotchas, that I should know about before I
    start designing and programming with this type of display?

    Thanks.
    andy
     


  2. There are many different graphic LCDs that you can try. A popular controller
    is the Seiko/Epson SED1335. It has built-in character generator (standard
    5x7 fixed-width font) and can handle up to three graphics layers, which
    helps with complex graphics. I've used it on a 240x128 pixels display with
    no problems. Do a Google search for "SED1335" and you should be able to find
    plenty of links and info. I think it has a parallel interface, but there are
    other SEDs with serial. For example. the Nokia 7110 mobile phone uses the
    SED1565 which has a serial interface. One thing to note, some LCDs come with
    NO built-in controller, so make sure you get one that has.

    Good luck.

    Costas
     


  3. Very smart, well done! I've done something similar a while ago with some
    Planar 320x240 EL graphic display modules which had no controller or RAM.
    These required the pixel data to be sent one bit at a time (like a serial
    stream), and horizontal/vertical sync pulses too. I used a PIC, a dual-port
    RAM, and some discrete logic, which I drove from the PIC's clock oscillator
    so that they were all in sync. It was quite a challenge, worked fine. No
    fancy graphics layers and character generators like the SED, but still a
    very rewarding design experience.

    Regards,
    Costas
    _________________________________________________
    Costas Vlachos Email:
    SPAM-TRAPPED: Please remove "-X-" before replying
     
  4. I have decided to try a Hantronix 240x64 pixel graphics LCD available from Mouser
    Electronics. It uses the Toshiba T6963C controller. I have documentation and
    some idea of the displays to generate, but no hands-on experience yet.
    I will be using the Rabbit RCM2200 "RabbitCore" controller and matching
    prototyping board. Anyone have sample code for driving the T6963C from a
    Rabbit? The code examples I have seen so far should be good enough, but I
    get the impression that (like character LCDs) nothing works untill the
    initialization routine is operating properly.

    Thanks for all the helpful suggestions, emails, and links.

    Andy




    Costas Vlachos () wrote:
    : : > As an alternative it is also possible, for some applications, to drive
    : > directly a parallel-type graphics LCD WITHOUT any graphics controller chip
    : > and even without any bitmap memory, with a well optimized bit-banging
    : > firmware... I've used this technique for a project that won a prize in the
    : > last Ciruit Cellar's contest (XY Plotter), you can have a look at it here
    : :
    : > http://www.circuitcellar.com/flash2002/honorable.htm
    : >
    : > Cheers,
    : >
    : > Robert Lacoste - ALCIOM : The mixed signals experts
    : > http://www.alciom.com
    :
    :
    :
    : Very smart, well done! I've done something similar a while ago with some
    : Planar 320x240 EL graphic display modules which had no controller or RAM.
    : These required the pixel data to be sent one bit at a time (like a serial
    : stream), and horizontal/vertical sync pulses too. I used a PIC, a dual-port
    : RAM, and some discrete logic, which I drove from the PIC's clock oscillator
    : so that they were all in sync. It was quite a challenge, worked fine. No
    : fancy graphics layers and character generators like the SED, but still a
    : very rewarding design experience.
    :
    : Regards,
    : Costas
    : _________________________________________________
    : Costas Vlachos Email:
    : SPAM-TRAPPED: Please remove "-X-" before replying
    :
    :
     
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