Connect with us

Glue Test in Cold Weather

Discussion in 'Security Alarms' started by earlw, Nov 1, 2005.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. earlw

    earlw Guest

    I'm mounting Magnets on exterior Vinyl Windows. The night temps have
    been getting down to the high 20's, and daytime temps have been in the
    40-50's. Seems Silicon II can't setup in those temps. So I did a
    small test of some glues to see what would work on the Windows in the
    cold. I gave the test about 36 hours. What I did was glue deck screws
    flat onto a plastic board (from an Ademco 4204 module) and left it
    outside in the sheltered front porch. It even snowed over night (no
    snow got on the plastic, Screw or glue).

    Results (from best to worst):

    1) Goop Household
    Glue cured well. Dry and set.
    The Screw was secured very well to the plastic board.
    You could barely move the Screw. The glue was flexible,
    but of all the glues tested, it was least flexible.

    2) RTV
    Glue cured well. Dry and set.
    The Screw was secured well to the plastic board.
    You could barely move the Screw. The glue was more
    flexible than the Goop, but not by a lot.

    3) GE Silicone II Siding & Trim, 10.1 oz
    Glue was not fully cured. Dry to the touch, and not
    sticky, but felt a little soft.
    The Screw was secured OK to the plastic board, but could
    be moved pretty easy - could be pulled off the board with
    little effort. Much more flexible than the Goop or RTV.

    4) GE Silicone II Household Glue, 3.5 oz
    Glue was not cured. Wet and Sticky as if I just pushed it
    out of the tube. It didn't seem to cure the least little bit.
    The Screw was not secured to the plastic board.

    Overall, the Goop and RTV seemed best to use. I posted this in case
    anyone wanted to comment on other glues that work well in cold temps.
     
  2. moe

    moe Guest

    use the goop or rtv and then use a bead of silicone around the edges for
    when the glue gives up the silicone will take over.
     
  3. Crash Gordon

    Crash Gordon Guest

    I believe Goop is silicon based.
    I swear by the stuff.


    | use the goop or rtv and then use a bead of silicone around the edges for
    | when the glue gives up the silicone will take over.
    |
    | | > I'm mounting Magnets on exterior Vinyl Windows. The night temps have
    | > been getting down to the high 20's, and daytime temps have been in the
    | > 40-50's. Seems Silicon II can't setup in those temps. So I did a
    | > small test of some glues to see what would work on the Windows in the
    | > cold. I gave the test about 36 hours. What I did was glue deck screws
    | > flat onto a plastic board (from an Ademco 4204 module) and left it
    | > outside in the sheltered front porch. It even snowed over night (no
    | > snow got on the plastic, Screw or glue).
    | >
    | > Results (from best to worst):
    | >
    | > 1) Goop Household
    | > Glue cured well. Dry and set.
    | > The Screw was secured very well to the plastic board.
    | > You could barely move the Screw. The glue was flexible,
    | > but of all the glues tested, it was least flexible.
    | >
    | > 2) RTV
    | > Glue cured well. Dry and set.
    | > The Screw was secured well to the plastic board.
    | > You could barely move the Screw. The glue was more
    | > flexible than the Goop, but not by a lot.
    | >
    | > 3) GE Silicone II Siding & Trim, 10.1 oz
    | > Glue was not fully cured. Dry to the touch, and not
    | > sticky, but felt a little soft.
    | > The Screw was secured OK to the plastic board, but could
    | > be moved pretty easy - could be pulled off the board with
    | > little effort. Much more flexible than the Goop or RTV.
    | >
    | > 4) GE Silicone II Household Glue, 3.5 oz
    | > Glue was not cured. Wet and Sticky as if I just pushed it
    | > out of the tube. It didn't seem to cure the least little bit.
    | > The Screw was not secured to the plastic board.
    | >
    | > Overall, the Goop and RTV seemed best to use. I posted this in case
    | > anyone wanted to comment on other glues that work well in cold temps.
    | >
    |
    |
     
  4. Jim Rojas

    Jim Rojas Guest

    Did you try clear liquid nails? It is sold at Walmart. Good stuff.

    Jim Rojas
     
  5. earlw

    earlw Guest

    I didn't try the Liquid Nails because I just had the regular stuff on
    hand. The 'Clear Seal All Purpose Sealant' version of Liquid Nails
    looks good. It's flexible and clear. The info is at
    http://www.liquidnails.com/ViewProductDetails.do?productId=4. Is this
    the one you were thinking about?

    -earlw
     
  6. Jim Rojas

    Jim Rojas Guest

    That may be the one. I usually buy the smaller plastic tubes for $3 each.

    Jim Rojas
     
  7. Crash Gordon

    Crash Gordon Guest

    so, you'd not be replacing a contact easily I gather!



    | Love that Liquid Nail. Whenever I open a new tube and have some left
    | over, I squeeze it into a air tight glass jar and then just apply some
    | with the end of a slot screwdriver anytime needed. It lasts forever as
    | long as you keep it sealed. It you use it make sure everything is in
    | place correctly, because once it dries that is it. Not like silicone,
    | which you can usually cut away if needed.
    |
    | BobbyD
    |
    | Jim Rojas wrote:
    |
    | >Did you try clear liquid nails? It is sold at Walmart. Good stuff.
    | >
    | >Jim Rojas
    | >
    | >| >
    | >
    | >>use the goop or rtv and then use a bead of silicone around the edges for
    | >>when the glue gives up the silicone will take over.
    | >>
    | >>| >>
    | >>
    | >>>I'm mounting Magnets on exterior Vinyl Windows. The night temps have
    | >>>been getting down to the high 20's, and daytime temps have been in the
    | >>>40-50's. Seems Silicon II can't setup in those temps. So I did a
    | >>>small test of some glues to see what would work on the Windows in the
    | >>>cold. I gave the test about 36 hours. What I did was glue deck screws
    | >>>flat onto a plastic board (from an Ademco 4204 module) and left it
    | >>>outside in the sheltered front porch. It even snowed over night (no
    | >>>snow got on the plastic, Screw or glue).
    | >>>
    | >>>Results (from best to worst):
    | >>>
    | >>> 1) Goop Household
    | >>> Glue cured well. Dry and set.
    | >>> The Screw was secured very well to the plastic board.
    | >>> You could barely move the Screw. The glue was flexible,
    | >>> but of all the glues tested, it was least flexible.
    | >>>
    | >>> 2) RTV
    | >>> Glue cured well. Dry and set.
    | >>> The Screw was secured well to the plastic board.
    | >>> You could barely move the Screw. The glue was more
    | >>> flexible than the Goop, but not by a lot.
    | >>>
    | >>> 3) GE Silicone II Siding & Trim, 10.1 oz
    | >>> Glue was not fully cured. Dry to the touch, and not
    | >>> sticky, but felt a little soft.
    | >>> The Screw was secured OK to the plastic board, but could
    | >>> be moved pretty easy - could be pulled off the board with
    | >>> little effort. Much more flexible than the Goop or RTV.
    | >>>
    | >>> 4) GE Silicone II Household Glue, 3.5 oz
    | >>> Glue was not cured. Wet and Sticky as if I just pushed it
    | >>> out of the tube. It didn't seem to cure the least little bit.
    | >>> The Screw was not secured to the plastic board.
    | >>>
    | >>>Overall, the Goop and RTV seemed best to use. I posted this in case
    | >>>anyone wanted to comment on other glues that work well in cold temps.
    | >>>
    | >>>
    | >>>
    | >>
    | >>
    | >
    | >
    | >
    | >
     
  8. earlw

    earlw Guest

    That was one of my concerns - a glue that would work so well that the
    magnet or contact would become "one" with the window and I would have
    to tear up the window to replace the magnet/contact. But I wanted a
    glue that would stick well enough that you would not be afraid to place
    a contact on the botton of the window. Didn't want water to enter the
    contact area and drip down into wall and insulation.

    So far I have been pretty impressed with Goop and RTV. I have used
    Silicon for other projects, but lately the temps here in Peyton
    Colorado (7,300') have been rather cool at night and Silicon seems to
    have a tough time setting up in cold temps. The Silicon II I used to
    hold the deck screw to a piece of plasic just peeled right off with
    little effort. I know Silicon does pretty good in warmer weather, so I
    just have to believe the cold temps are the problem. Since cold temps
    are the norm here until next May, it's something I just have to deal
    with...
     
  9. Crash Gordon

    Crash Gordon Guest

    I've always had problems with silicon in cold...also if you remove a contact
    that was previously siliconed on, forget about getting the new silicon to
    stick. I dont have these problems with the goop.


    | That was one of my concerns - a glue that would work so well that the
    | magnet or contact would become "one" with the window and I would have
    | to tear up the window to replace the magnet/contact. But I wanted a
    | glue that would stick well enough that you would not be afraid to place
    | a contact on the botton of the window. Didn't want water to enter the
    | contact area and drip down into wall and insulation.
    |
    | So far I have been pretty impressed with Goop and RTV. I have used
    | Silicon for other projects, but lately the temps here in Peyton
    | Colorado (7,300') have been rather cool at night and Silicon seems to
    | have a tough time setting up in cold temps. The Silicon II I used to
    | hold the deck screw to a piece of plasic just peeled right off with
    | little effort. I know Silicon does pretty good in warmer weather, so I
    | just have to believe the cold temps are the problem. Since cold temps
    | are the norm here until next May, it's something I just have to deal
    | with...
    |
    |
     
  10. Frank Olson

    Frank Olson Guest


    You haven't experienced the kind of *cold* you get in Edmonton (-40 C). RTV
    sucks... Goop all the way!!!
     
  11. Jim

    Jim Guest

    Here's a little hint for anyone who hasn't already thought of it.

    I happen to use 3M cement as a glue, when needed. I hardly ever use
    RTV. For a sealant I use an acrylic type. However, when it's cold, any
    of them are hard to work with. If there's a microwave oven around, put
    the tube in for about 10 or 15 seconds at a time until it gets warm
    enough to flow. It'll usually work better. Once heated, carry the tube
    in you pants pocket to keep it warm. Another hint is ....... since I
    still carry my window foil kit with me, I have a heat gun. If it's
    really that cold and the cement/sealant wont adhere, heat up the
    contact or object and the area you're going to cement it to, with the
    heat gun first. Also, just in case someone doesn't already know about
    it, when applying sealant or silicone, if you want to keep it from
    sticking to your fingers, mix up some soapy water and dip your fingers
    in it before you "work" the sealant. Works great when you want to
    smooth out that bead you just applied to a piece of molding.

    Jeeeez I'm beginning to sound like Bass.
     
  12. moe

    moe Guest

    if you had said that even a monkey can do it I would have started worrying.
     
  13. Good post...
    Thanks...
    Allan

     
  14. Frank Olson

    Frank Olson Guest

    Great post, Jim. You spelled "moulding" wrong... :))

    Not even close.
     
  15. Guest

    I've worked in similar conditions and this is what I did. It worked
    for me for many years. YMMV.

    Use the adhesive pad on the back of the sensors (Sentrol 1035, for
    example) to hold the sensor and magnet in place. After testing the
    circuit draw a small bead of white RTV along the top and bottom edges
    of each piece. The RTV will dry in an hour or less and completely cure
    in a day. Cold temperatures slow but do not stop the curing process.

    Regards,
    Robert L Bass
    www.BassBurglarAlarms.com
     
  16. Guest

    "Also, just in case someone doesn't already know about
    it, when applying sealant or silicone, if you want to keep it from
    sticking to your fingers, mix up some soapy water and dip your fingers
    in it before you 'work' the sealant. Works great when you want to
    smooth out that bead you just applied to a piece of molding."

    I use RTV. If I get a little on my fingers I just rub it off on a
    clean paper towel. The soapy water idea sounds good though.
    You speak Portuguese, too? :^)

    Regards,
    RobertLBass
    www.BassBurglarAlarms.com
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-