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Germanium diodes

Discussion in 'Electronic Components' started by lexderr, May 28, 2004.

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  1. lexderr

    lexderr Guest

    I have been reading a book called "Bench Test Circuits for
    Surveillance and Countersurveillance Technicians" by Tom Larsen and
    have been trying to locate "wide-band-width 5GHz range Germanium diode
    with a lover than normal forward voltage to use in a bug dectector
    listed in his book. Anyone got any ideas?
    Thanks
     
  2. mike

    mike Guest

    How about a 1N21E still in the military lead pack.
    Make an offer,
    mike

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  3. 1N5711 Schottky signal diodes are used for VHF and UHF work and are
    available on Ebay for fairly cheap. But any old 1N60 or other low
    capacitance video detector should work somewhat. The leads on the
    diode can act as a dipole antenna and pick up wavelengths that are up in
    the GHz range.

    ALso you might consider a microwave oven leakage detector. They're not
    as sensitive, but then you could put additional circuitry into one to
    boost the sensitivity. Also radar detectors for the car.

    If you're serious about that stuff, then you should check out some of
    the websites that offer that kind of equipment. They want some serious
    money for this stuff.

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  4. Dbowey

    Dbowey Guest

    I have a bunch of hot carrier diodes left over from an old 2 GHz project. They
    may work at 6.

    If the OP will email me I will mail a couple for free.

    Don
     
  5. lexderr

    lexderr Guest

    My address is Charles Derr, 7711 Greenwood Ave N #202, Seattle, WA
    98103. email is .
    Thank you in advance.
    Chuck
     
  6. Dbowey

    Dbowey Guest

    Chuck,

    They will go in Tuesday mail from Washougal.

    Don
     
  7. Guest

    I have a bunch of vintage Germanium Diodes. A lot of them are the
    ceramic cartridge type with two gold ends made for detectors. Lots of
    these are packed in little lead tubes. Some are eeeny meeeeny little
    things packed in lead envelopes. (BTW why are they packed this way?)
    If the book suggests a part number, please post it or email me. Would
    be glad to send you one N/C if I have it.

     
  8. Dbowey

    Dbowey Guest

    re:

    << I have a bunch of vintage Germanium Diodes. A lot of them are the
    ceramic cartridge type with two gold ends made for detectors. Lots of
    these are packed in little lead tubes. Some are eeeny meeeeny little
    things packed in lead envelopes. (BTW why are they packed this way?)
    If the book suggests a part number, please post it or email me. Would
    be glad to send you one N/C if I have it.
    They are packed that way for static protection. A couple part numbers for this
    style is 1N21 and 1N23, with or without a suffix. They were common in
    microwave, and some UHF, receivers.

    Don
     
  9. Hi,

    I always understood that the metal capsules were meant as a
    micro-wavelength radiation screen. Diodes such as these are often
    used as mixers (although they were silicon in my day) and so
    could find themselves stored close to a high power source. As the
    semiconductor package might be a sizable fraction of the
    wavelength used, a largish voltage could be developed across them
    with dire results.


    Cheers - Joe
     
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