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Generators Work...

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Moha99, Jun 4, 2012.

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  1. Moha99

    Moha99

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    0
    Nov 18, 2011
    Hallo all!


    In a generator when energy is applied to it it causes the roter to spin the magnets through copper windings to convert mechanical energy to electrical.

    Magnets produce a magnetic field on the copper windings that result in the conversion. Can I calculate that conversion in this form: W = F x D

    Where F is the force provided by the magnetic field of the magnets
    and the D based on the revolutions per minute that would give me the output of the system is that possibile to do?

    Finally if I increased the amount of magnets in the system the force would increase right? that results in a higher output lets say we added magnets 2 times more

    W = (2)F x D, the energy output would be higher right?

    Hope I'm making sense...Thanks in advance
    Moha,
     
  2. duke37

    duke37

    5,364
    772
    Jan 9, 2011
    That seems about the right principle, however the equation is:-

    Power (W) = Torque (N.m) * Speed (radians/sec)

    This is the power going into the machine, you will get less out.
     
  3. Moha99

    Moha99

    261
    0
    Nov 18, 2011

    I converted the generators rpm rate to meter/s, in my case I have magnets with a pull force of 20 pounds of pull force(lb) converted that to newtons = 88.964432 N x D(What is it in this case? the distance between the magnets the copper windings?) X R(Radians what is that in my generator?)

    Thanks in advance!

    *I can add another layer of magnets it can fit without making a problem for the roter so that would be 20 x 2 = 50 lb's of pull force.*

    Thanks!
     
  4. duke37

    duke37

    5,364
    772
    Jan 9, 2011
    You make life difficult by not using SI units.

    A radian is a measure of angle. There are 2*pi radians in a circle.
    To go from RPM to radians/sec, multiply RPM by 2pi and divide by 60.

    Torque is a measure of tangential force times distance from the rotary axis. I do not see how you find this value without experiment. A static force will not generate power, a variation in force is necessary. There may be a large static force but the important measure is the variation in force as the magnets pass the pole pieces but I do not understand magnetic circuits.
     
  5. Moha99

    Moha99

    261
    0
    Nov 18, 2011

    Thanks. I'm starting to build up a permanent magnet generator and I'll use you're explanation to work out the process.

    Any more inputs will be much appreciated!
     
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