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General battery capacity question (between two different battery packs)

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by MKANET, Jul 18, 2012.

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  1. MKANET

    MKANET

    26
    0
    Jun 3, 2012
    Im still trying to grasp my head around battery capacity and technology we use today. However, from what I can see below, something doesnt add up. I probably shouldnt be presuming this; but, I would think that both devices use lithium ion; and, the products are in the smallest possible enclosure they can fit in. However, the size that Product B shows looks a little too big for it's capacity when compared to Product A.

    Maybe Product A figured out a way to make their product more space efficient using a more advanced technology? Last year's model for Product A, used to be 11000mAh capacity that fit in the same enclosure; which would better match the specs in Product B.

    Product A: New Trent iCarrier 12000mAh battery pack
    Dimensions: 2.9 x 2.8 x 1.1 inches, weight unknown

    Product B: Anker® Astro3 10000mAh
    Dimensions: 4.9 x 2.9 x 0.9 inches ; 9.9 ounces

    I'm guessing most people wouldnt really care one way or another, but Im curious what they might have done to in this year's Product A to make it a bit more space efficient.
     
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,598
    1,875
    Sep 5, 2009
    battery technology is advancing in leaps and bounds
    they are constantly producing a higher capacity for the same size or smaller package

    Dave
     
  3. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    5
    Apr 7, 2012
    Not to mention there is no official standard at which batteries are measured... So in reality the numbers are pretty useless... One battery company might measure the drain time with a 1mA load while another might measure it with a 10mA load, others will aim for a set discharge time and reverse factor the load based on that time and then just like any less then honest company they will pad the results in their favor based on the best results they could get out of multiple test in a laboratory environment...

    There are a few websites that are devoted to testing lipo battery packs and the real world results vs the stated ones are ALL over the board, some close some not even in the ballpark... You will also find the cells you purchase today from company A might not be the same cells you get next week if you reorder... And since 99% of the packs come from China where all the lithium comes from you can't simply state the Chinese ones are the bad ones and the blah blah are the good ones, it's not that simple...

    In the end take the measurement with a grain of salt, especially if there is no documented datasheet from the battery manufacture graphing the test results... You will generally only see these charts from the big name brands like Energizer and Duracell...

    As for the size my phone has a 'verified' 1500 mAH battery that is 1.75 x 2.55 x 0.22 (aka 0.98 cubic inches, it actually has a little spacer block so the battery itself is a bit smaller) take those numbers and it very possible to get a 12000 mAH battery in the 8.932 cubic inch space you have indicated...

    (8.932 / 0.98) * 1500 = 13,671
     
  4. MKANET

    MKANET

    26
    0
    Jun 3, 2012
    Ohoh... I hope I didn't use the wrong output plug!

    Wow thanks for explaining so much in detail. Im still testing Product A. I was using Product A all night last night; and, lasted way beyond I was able to stay awake.


    However, I did something really stupid. I didn't read the directions!!

    Coca-Cola or anyone, could you please tell me which Output plug would be most appropriate for my Wireless USB Transmitter (based on it's original AC wall adapter)?

    I can't remember which plug I plugged it into, I "think" I put it in Output 1. I really worried I might have reduced the life of my Wireless USB Transmitter. *How serious is it if I had put it in the wrong Output?

    Anyway, I would like to know which Output 1 or Output 2 is ideal for my Wireless USB Transmitter (based on what it says on the original AC wall power adapter that came with the USB Transmitter:
    [​IMG]


    Here's a picture of the original AC wall adapter:
    [​IMG]


    I can't stop stressing out that I might have somehow caused unnecessary stress or wear on my USB wireless transmitter by possibly using the wrong Output plug.
     
  5. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    5
    Apr 7, 2012
    Either one will work just fine for your USB standard device, as the USB standard only officially supports current drains up to about 1A... So any compliant USB device should use less then 1A... The higher rated output is for things like new phones, that have detection circuitry in them... If they detect a 'real' USB port they will only draw the maximum current within USB specs, basically they throttle down the charge rate... If they detect a charger circuit they will draw more current so they charge faster...
     
  6. MKANET

    MKANET

    26
    0
    Jun 3, 2012
    Thanks. That's a relief to know it's pretty much dummy proof.

    So, either output plug would be just as efficient in terms of how long the battery can provide power to the device before running out of charge?

    BTW, I just found out that this battery takes 10 hours to charge!! This battery is rated average of 500 uses. This is the first rechargeable battery I've bought that takes that long time charge. Even my laptop batteries only take about 3-4 hours.
     
  7. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    5
    Apr 7, 2012
    That would really depend on the circuitry they used, I suspect that any difference (if there is any) is minimal though...

    And I'm sure it could be charged faster but slow charging is beneficial to long term battery life...
     
  8. MKANET

    MKANET

    26
    0
    Jun 3, 2012
    Holy cow, I just tested the 12000mah battery pack's real world capacity...

    It powered my wireless USB transmitter for over 40 hours! Honestly, I didn't expect any more than 12 hours out of it.


    How could my guess been so far off?

    I figured that my battery pack would be roughly equal to 8 standard Duracell AA batteries (~1500mah each), 8 AA batteries would make it equal to 12000mah.

    2 AA batteries keep my device running for about 3 hours, so I figured that 8 of them would last 4 times as long... 12 hours.

    I remember in another forum thread here, someone mentioned that having multiple AA batteries in an array isn't as efficient as one big battery. Maybe that's the reason? I had no idea it could be THAT bad. I wonder why so many electronics devices use multiple AA or AAA batteries, if it's that inefficient.
     
  9. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,598
    1,875
    Sep 5, 2009
    well it depends almost entirely on the current drain of your 2 devices
    you havent told us what the current drain of either device ??

    Dave
     
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