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From batteries to Wall power supply

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by Casper Christensen, Dec 8, 2014.

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  1. Casper Christensen

    Casper Christensen

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    Dec 8, 2014
    Wow, sorry for the big Picture :confused:
    ( resized for you :) )

    The dummy battery can sit in both left side and right side and it still works. It doesnt work if im only using one battery and two dummies. I guess the power isn't strong enought then. But in theory. Can't i just put the two the dummies in the sides and then attach the phone cord in the middle?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 19, 2014
  2. chopnhack

    chopnhack

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    Apr 28, 2014
    Agreed, I would still take the three AAA batteries and tape them together and use that as my source.
     
  3. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    Jun 25, 2014
    Please elaborate on how you plan to attach the phone cord in the middle.. ?
    If you make a dummy battery with the phone cord so that one end is negative and the other end it +5V, the you can put the other two dummy batteries in and be fine No extra mucking required. This could be interpreted a couple different ways though... so I want to know what you mean.
    The alternative is putting the positive from the phone cord on one dummy, and the negative on the other... this could result in a short if you put the dummies in the wrong battery holes. (Would guess that leaving the middle empty would be fine... guessing)

    Chopnhack bring up a great point... take the 3 batteries you have.. tape em together and use them as an external battery pack with two wire leads... test your dummies with this... then connect the phone cord once you know it works
     
  4. Casper Christensen

    Casper Christensen

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    Dec 8, 2014
    Apparently my plan did not work out as i thougt. I think i have misunderstood the entire thing. I thought the batteries at the sides would transfer the electricity to the hatch, and then it would combine with the one in the middle and go down through the middle and light the torch :confused:
     
  5. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    Jun 25, 2014
    Lol. Not quite.
    Picture it this way:
    There is a negative contact in the Left or Right most battery hole. (Most likely left)
    There is a positive contact in the Middle battery hole, or the little metal nub that contacts the lid. (Most likely the nub)

    When the batteries are inserted.. there are jumper wires that will chain them all together so that the batteries add up to about 4.5V.

    Take another look here
    View attachment 17719
    See the green wire? That is most likely how the lid connects the batteries together.
    The blue wire is most likely inside the torch, but if you 'follow' the electricity path the picture I posted shows the following path:
    -Into the nub
    -back out the Left battery hole
    -across the lid and into the middle battery hole
    -across the blue jumper and back out the right battery hole
    -across the lid and back into the nub.

    What you can try is this:
    Make two dummy batteries.
    Connect the positive wire to one of them.
    Connect the negative wire to the other.

    Put the positive dummy in the right-most hole closest to the nub. (Nub marked with the Red + on the image)
    Put the negative dummy in the left-most hole. (Marked with the White - on the image)

    The middle hole MUST be left empty. Do you know why?
     
  6. Casper Christensen

    Casper Christensen

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    Dec 8, 2014
    I have no clue why :oops:
     
  7. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    Jun 25, 2014
    Think of it this way. And this may not be 100% accurate depending on the build of your dummy batteries.
    With the application of the dummy batteries... the entire battery would be a positive or negative unless you carefully insulate one end to prevent electrical contact. This means that if you put a dummy battery in the left and right hole to provide voltage, then using a dummy in the middle may allow the positive and negative dummy to short out.
    I may have given a poor example to start off with, I will get you a picture and we'll see what you think.
     
  8. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    Jun 25, 2014
    K. So I got a couple pictures for you.
    You should compare them to this one:
    Untitled.jpg

    Normal Operation:
    Battery Normal.jpg
    The batteries and jumpers form a path...
    So starting at 0V, the path goes through the first (left-most) battery picking up 1.5V.
    It then takes the first jumper (Green.. inside the lid) and goes through the second (middle) battery picking up another 1.5V. (We are now at 3V)
    It then takes the second jumper (Blue.. inside the torch) and goes through the third (right-most) battery picking up another 1.5V (We are not at 4.5V)
    This stops at the lid though... so there is one more jumper that connects to the metal nub. (Or red wire in the pic) to carry the voltage back to the torch.
    From here, the cycle starts again.

    Dummy battery Operation:
    Battery Dummies.jpg
    Here is where my explanation of the middle battery may have been vague...
    The exact same path applies... but there is a quirk.
    If you connect the positive wire of the phone cord to a dummy battery that has a metal contact on EACH end... then both sides of the dummy will be positive. Same holds true for the negative battery.
    So. With that basic assumption in place... the dummies may allow the electricity to flow backwards through the middle dummy instead of going through the torch (Yellow Arrow.. is a short circuit)... By leaving the middle open. the electricity from the phone cord is forced through the torch. The other solution is to insulate one end of each dummy battery (purple scribble). Even if you insulate the ends, the middle dummy battery will still have no use because it is not directly connected to the torch in any way.. it is only connected to jumpers.
    With what we are trying to do, we only care that 0V in the same place as before, and the 4.5V is in the same place. Hopefully this clears it up. If not. Let me know what 'you' think and we can clarify it.
     
  9. chopnhack

    chopnhack

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    Apr 28, 2014
    Casper, have you tried removing the two screws directly above the battery hatch? I am curious if the torch housing is screwed into the base. If removal of the screws allows the "innards" to come out, it might be easier to i.d. what is going on.

    As for dummy batteries, if you find out which two terminals need the power, you can simply use a wooden dowel with wire attached on the desired end.
     
  10. Casper Christensen

    Casper Christensen

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    Dec 8, 2014
    After reading you guys posts and fiddling with the torch i found the way! I don't know if it is stable, smart or not. I removed the isolation and the wire for the data transfer from the phone charger so i only had the positive and negative wire. Then i burned the wires over a candle to remove the isolation from them as well. (Was too small to cut). I plugged the phone charger into my computer and then i connected the positive wire to the nub and the negative to left most dummy. And it worked. no need for the hatch or the right side at all.

    Now i just need to find way to keep them connected, tape is not really a solution :confused:

    Those screws just holds the flip thing on place do you can hang it on the wall. There's nothing underneath it.
     
  11. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    Jun 25, 2014
    Lol. Well, I am very glad my assumptions were correct. If they had been wrong you could have possibly killed the phone charger. I was certain I mentioned that they were assumptions...
    That is the entire reason we wanted to take a look in the unit, or measure which tabs on the lid were internally connected.
    Regardless, if I were in a pinch, I would have done exactly what you have so I'm not going to hold it against you ;)

    As far as keeping the wire in place:
    I'd try to make a small indent or hole in the lid to put the wire in, and I would simply rely on the lid to hold the wire in place once it was closed.
    Ideally, I would make two dummy batteries... One with the negative wire, and one with the positive. This would require the lid anyway, but having the wire attached to the dummies would prevent the wire from slipping, or coming loose compared to simply wedging it under the lid.

    This of course will depend on what tools you have at your disposal... Putting tape on the wire may be a perfectly viable option to hold everything in position so you can clamp it down with the lid ;)

    Keep us posted on how you want it done, and we can explore other options.
     
  12. chopnhack

    chopnhack

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    Apr 28, 2014
    Cool! Glad it worked out for you :)
     
  13. Casper Christensen

    Casper Christensen

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    Dec 8, 2014
    I will go on a vacation tomorrow but when i get home and get the time to it, I will mount it on the wall and hide the wires as much as possible. If i need any help for this i will post here again :)

    thanks for all the replies so far! ;)
     
    chopnhack and Gryd3 like this.
  14. chopnhack

    chopnhack

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    Apr 28, 2014
    Enjoy, as for hiding the wire, plug mold is a great product. In your case, since its only a thin slender wire, consider painting it with the same color paint as your wall :) Cheers and Merry Christmas.
     
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