Connect with us

fried Boom Box

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Redlocks, Jan 27, 2005.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Redlocks

    Redlocks Guest

    While travelling in the Caribbean I plugged a combination CD/cassette/radio
    portable stereo into what appeared to be a normal 110V ac outlet. The
    digital radio dial lit up with the frequency of the last FM station that I
    listened to. Not bothering to tune in a station at the time I turned the
    unit off. Later that evening my girlfriend tried to play a CD, however the
    boom box gave no indication whatsoever that it was receiving power. Even
    though it no longer works, it brought it back to the States with me. By any
    chance am I likely to find just a blown fuse or some other easy repair?

    Thanks.

    John
     
  2. It's possible. Only way to know will be to troubleshoot it. It's unlikely
    anyone has a schematic so it will be a matter of going inside and tracing
    the wiring, measuring voltages, etc.

    --- sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ Mirror: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/
    Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/REPAIR/
    +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/sam/lasersam.htm
    | Mirror Sites: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/REPAIR/F_mirror.html

    Note: These links are hopefully temporary until we can sort out the excessive
    traffic on Repairfaq.org.

    Important: Anything sent to the email address in the message header above is
    ignored unless my full name is included in the subject line. Or, you can
    contact me via the Feedback Form in the FAQs.
     
  3. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest

    Probably burned out the primary of the power transformer, if it has a single
    (or fairly common) secondary(s) then you shouldn't have too much trouble
    finding a suitable replacement. It might have a thermal fuse embedded in it
    that blew, you may be able to get in there and replace that too.
     
  4. Stan

    Stan Guest

    }While travelling in the Caribbean I plugged a combination CD/cassette/radio
    }portable stereo into what appeared to be a normal 110V ac outlet.

    Normal as in 110 volts, yes...but Jamaica is 50 Hz, not USA 60 hz.

    }By any
    }chance am I likely to find just a blown fuse or some other easy repair?

    So maybe the power transformer overheated...try testing both primary
    and secondary for continuity.

    Stan.
     
  5. Stan®

    Stan® Guest

    [CUT]

    Those portable stereos do have a simply transformer. It in many cases have
    only one secondary which usually is about 8 VAC @ 20-30VA. Yeah, simply
    transformers (no switching) can overheat and burn when used to a different
    HZ frequency
    DANGER : You may ask for the tension/frequency of the state U are going.
    Examples :
    AMERICA/CANADA (excluding South America) 110V @ 60HZ
    NEW YORK SUBNET 600V @ 400HZ
    in south america there isn't a standard, in most of cases there are 117vac
    or vdc, or 110vac, or 220vac @ 50 or 60Hz.
    Check before !!!!

    Inti
     
  6. Stan

    Stan Guest

    }[CUT]
    }
    }Those portable stereos do have a simply transformer. It in many cases have
    }only one secondary which usually is about 8 VAC @ 20-30VA. Yeah, simply
    }transformers (no switching) can overheat and burn when used to a different
    }HZ frequency
    }DANGER : You may ask for the tension/frequency of the state U are going.
    }Examples :
    }AMERICA/CANADA (excluding South America) 110V @ 60HZ
    }NEW YORK SUBNET 600V @ 400HZ

    ????

    Are you saying that somewhere in the state of New York the power at home
    wall outlets is 600V @ 400HZ?

    If so, cite reliable references please.

    Stan.
     
  7. Gary J. Tait

    Gary J. Tait Guest

    Where is that? Nowhere is that voltage/frequncy available to the
    general public.
     
  8. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest

    And the standard household voltage is 120v 60 Hz, not 110v.
     
  9. Stan®

    Stan® Guest

    The 600V @ 400Hz isn't available for home standard contracts. It is only
    present under the ways, in the subway ! Search in the RepairFaq of Sam
    GoldWasser

    Intiglietta
     
  10. NSM

    NSM Guest

    What does the subway use it for?
     
  11. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest

    Probably the subway train itself, I remember reading that the light rail
    system in Portland, OR runs on 600V, it's likely a standard for electric
    trains.

    I seriously doubt it's available at any sort of receptacle in the subway
    system accessible to the average person, that would be a dissaster waiting
    to happen.
     
  12. Here's what the International Power FAQ actually says with respect to
    voltage and frequency. I'm not sure how it got garbled the way it is
    above:

    "This relates to what comes out of the wall socket. Nearly every country in
    the world uses an AC voltage between 90 and 240 V at 50 or 60 Hz. There may
    be some exceptions (like 600 V at 25 Hz powering portions of the New York City
    subway system or 28 V at 400 Hz on board an F-18 - but this is not something
    you are likely to need to deal with!) - if you encounter such unusual
    situations, we will be happy to add them to this document!"

    The only other references to 400 Hz state that switchmode power supplies
    may accept a frequency up to 400 Hz or more.

    --- sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ Mirror: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/
    Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/REPAIR/
    +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/sam/lasersam.htm
    | Mirror Sites: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/REPAIR/F_mirror.html

    Note: These links are hopefully temporary until we can sort out the excessive
    traffic on Repairfaq.org.

    Important: Anything sent to the email address in the message header above is
    ignored unless my full name is included in the subject line. Or, you can
    contact me via the Feedback Form in the FAQs.
     
  13. Stan

    Stan Guest

    }}>
    }> }[CUT]
    }> }
    }> }Those portable stereos do have a simply transformer. It in many cases
    }have
    }> }only one secondary which usually is about 8 VAC @ 20-30VA. Yeah, simply
    }> }transformers (no switching) can overheat and burn when used to a
    }different
    }> }HZ frequency
    }> }DANGER : You may ask for the tension/frequency of the state U are going.
    }> }Examples :
    }> }AMERICA/CANADA (excluding South America) 110V @ 60HZ
    }> }NEW YORK SUBNET 600V @ 400HZ
    }>
    }> ????
    }>
    }> Are you saying that somewhere in the state of New York the power at home
    }> wall outlets is 600V @ 400HZ?
    }The 600V @ 400Hz isn't available for home standard contracts. It is only
    }present under the ways, in the subway !

    OK...since the original post was about boomboxes failing when plugged
    into non-USA standard wall sockets, perhaps manufacturers should put
    a warning label on them, telling users not to try to power their boomboxes
    off the live rail of a subway system.

    Stan.
     
  14. NSM

    NSM Guest

    That makes more sense. Planes use 400 Hz to save weight. Some of the old
    Niagara alternators were 25 cycle. But I can see no reason for 600 Volt 400
    Hz for any part of the subway system. That'd be weird.
     
  15. Yeah, then some idiot will try it just to see what happens!

    --- sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ Mirror: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/
    Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/REPAIR/
    +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/sam/lasersam.htm
    | Mirror Sites: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/REPAIR/F_mirror.html

    Note: These links are hopefully temporary until we can sort out the excessive
    traffic on Repairfaq.org.

    Important: Anything sent to the email address in the message header above is
    ignored unless my full name is included in the subject line. Or, you can
    contact me via the Feedback Form in the FAQs.
     
  16. Jack Zeal

    Jack Zeal Guest

    Many of the rail systems are reliant on extremely old (first half 20th
    century) infrastructure. I think, for example, the overhead
    electrification in the northeast US was an odd setting (possibly 12kv?)
    until like the 1970s, replaced with a common industrial voltage
    (possibly 25kv?) Also, Grand Central Terminal still serves locomotives
    over 40 years old (the FL9s) and the corresponding third-rail
    electricity must remain compatible.

    The 400Hz's odd; ISTR there were some DC fittings in New York.
     
  17. Ken Weitzel

    Ken Weitzel Guest

    Hi...

    Man, flashback... flickering lightbulbs, you could
    watch the filaments dance :)

    The subways were built way back in the olden days, before
    our current disposable attitudes. Maybe they just stuck
    with 25 cycles to continue to provide a use for the old
    generators?

    And of course 600 volts is a bit more efficient distribution
    system, so perhaps that's part of it.

    Finally, the theft of hydro is a bit of an issue these
    days... stealing a *lot* from a subway system would
    hardly be noticeable... so, perhaps 600 volts is just
    left in place to discourage theft? Kinda thinking that
    120 doesn't bother me a bit; go to 240 and I'll be real
    careful; at 600 it's one strike you're out...

    Ken
     
  18. NSM

    NSM Guest

    Back home some of the old elevators used to run off the DC for the street
    cars. I'm sure they've all long since been replaced.

    N
     
  19. NSM

    NSM Guest

    Or as we say, "One flash and you're ash"!

    N
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-