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Free 2nd year undergrad online analog electronics course

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Spehro Pefhany, Mar 12, 2012.

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  1. MIT is offering a free introductory (2nd year/sophomore) undergraduate
    analog electronics course.. entirely online.

    https://6002x.mitx.mit.edu/


    March 5, 2012 through June 8, 2012, but it looks like you can still
    enroll if you want.

    They expect students to be able to do basic math and physics*.

    This is the text ($95 from Amazon.com) but it's NOT required.
    http://www.amazon.com/dp/1558607358/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_til?tag=fullspectrumcompetence-20


    * Prerequisites:
    In order to succeed in this course, students must have taken an
    Advanced Placement (AP) level physics course in electricity and
    magnetism. Students must know basic calculus and linear algebra, and
    have some background in differential equations.

    MIT has been at the forefront in OpenCourseWare (OCW), and this takes
    it to a new level.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenCourseWare



    Best regards,
    Spehro Pefhany
     
  2. On Sun, 11 Mar 2012 19:18:54 -0700 (PDT), the renowned
    I can do many things.. but (at least relevant portions of) the book
    look(s) to be online for the course, so if an e-book is okay... it's
    available at no cost.
    Yes, but it is a 2nd year introductory undgraduate course.. like after
    they lay a solid base of math and physics in 1st year, they can
    _start_ talking about circuits.

    http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/#electrical-engineering-and-computer-science

    It's not going to do an EE very much good unless they've forgotten
    just about everything they learned.


    Best regards,
    Spehro Pefhany
     
  3. I'm starting to go through courseware on the Applied Superconductivity
    (similar to 6.763).. looks like it dawned on Prof. T. Orlando that he
    could get more money if he pulled his illustrations from the slides
    and made you buy his book, but that's okay (unfortunately it's out of
    print and a bit expensive, but I tracked down a copy).

    For example:-

    "Image removed for copyright reasons. Please see: Figure 8.8, page
    411, from Orlando, T., and K. Delin. Foundations of Applied
    Superconductivity. Reading, MA".


    Best regards,
    Spehro Pefhany
     

  4. Addison-Wesley.. that makes sense. I forget how much you give up when
    you sign a book contract.



    Best regards,
    Spehro Pefhany
     
  5. Doesn't sound so attractive considering the enormous amount of work
    required. Fame, if not fortune, I suppose.

    I notice he took out all the illustrations, not just the ones from his
    book, but also ones he lifted from elsewhere. Probably just didn't
    have the time or budget to recreate or negotiate releases for the
    illustrations.

    --sp


    Best regards,
    Spehro Pefhany
     
  6. Joerg

    Joerg Guest

    $9k is still a nice chunk to go towards you kids' tuition.

    Our pastor self-published. He sells the book through his own web site
    and some other online stores. Some of those deals works in a way where
    books are printed as orders come in. But unlike a certain semiconductor
    company they don't wait until a huge bulk order comes in :)
     
  7. Joerg

    Joerg Guest

    True, but ... some day a famous scholar will say "As Dr.Hobbs wrote 200
    years ago the noise in a transimpedance amplifier can be ..."

    The problem with highly technical books is that the audience that can
    even remotely be expected to understand the stuff in them is so small
    that you can't even sell five digit quantities.
     
  8. miso

    miso Guest

    Your just figuring that out? ;-)

    Looking at the index, it seems like a poor way to learn circuit design.
    For instance, it goes into transistors, then later on does RLC circuits.
    What is this? ADD ADHD? It would make more sense to beat circuit theory
    to death so that the student is on autopilot when they reach active
    components.

    Seriously , there is no need for this book to exist. I suppose I'm an
    old fart, but Wiley has a series of basic electronics books for decades.
    This is just reinventing the wheel to make money.
     
  9. Seems kind of arbitrary which you do first- nonlinear or reactive
    parts. Kids have the attention span of a gnat these days, so maybe
    it's intended to be motivational.
    Certainly nothing new has changed in a basic textbook in decades,
    though the emphasis seems less analytical and more intuitive than the
    way I was taught, which was pretty rigorous. Anyway, it's not making
    any money for them in this course if you use the online bits.


    Best regards,
    Spehro Pefhany
     
  10. miso

    miso Guest

  11. Fred Abse

    Fred Abse Guest

    I have Kreyszig's "Advanced Engineering Mathematics". That's Wiley.
     
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