Connect with us

Fluke DMM recommendations?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Matt J. McCullar, Aug 19, 2007.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. My trusty Fluke 77, which I've fondly used nearly every day for about 20
    years, is about to give up the ghost. I've already taken it apart and
    repaired it several times over the years, but I get the feeling that it's
    not long for this world. It's giving me warning signals to "abandon ship."
    I do hate to part with it, but it's simply wearing out and it's time to
    upgrade.

    Yeah, I know, I can simply shop on-line or visit local pawn shops and buy
    another. There are plenty of them out there, but I'm not really comfortable
    buying a used meter. Lord knows what's happened to it, and I took good care
    of MINE. And I doubt Fluke is still making 77s. (If I'm wrong, please tell
    me.) I've worked on mine often enough over its lifetime that if I sent it
    to Fluke for real repair and calibration, they'd just laugh and stuff it
    right back in the box and ship it back to me with a note saying "Buy a new
    one." (The store I bought it from, Industrial Electronics, just off
    Montgomery Street in Fort Worth, closed several years ago.) Does Fluke
    offer refurbished models for sale? (Sorry for not checking that in
    advance...)

    The Fluke 77 does everything I need, but there's one feature that I've
    practically never used: Touch-Hold. I mention this because I'm sure Fluke's
    current new crop of digital multimeters can do everything the 77 did, plus
    a great deal more. I don't want anything more than what I've got now; I
    wouldn't use the capacitance test function, or a big LCD scope meter, or a
    USB port, or an automatic dish washer or anything else. I'd just like to
    replace what I've got with something new, be it a new model number or
    whatever.

    There's a Fry's Electronics here in Arlington that carries a lot of good
    test equipment (I bought a Tektronix dual-polarity benchtop power supply
    from them a few years ago on sale because it was a showroom model, and I'm
    still very pleased with it), but I haven't gone shopping there yet because I
    wanted to ask everyone here first: What should I look for in today's Fluke
    DMMs, and which ones should I avoid?

    I'd like to keep the same physical size if at all possible, because the
    original 77 fits snugly into my toolbox (an old ammunition box). I don't
    think anything much bigger would fit in there.

    Now for my next problem: making my old meter fit in my photo album. :)

    Thanks!!!
    Matt J. McCullar, KJ5BA
    Arlington, TX
     
  2. Guest

    Check with Fluke.

    a) many have actual lifetime guarantees.
    b) they will fix many others for a nominal fee, if any.

    Peter Wieck
    Wyncote, PA
     
  3. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

  4. JANA

    JANA Guest

    I would recommend the Fluke 87 series. Check them out. These are excellent
    meters for general troubleshooting. This is the main stream model we use in
    our facilities.

    We also have a number of Fluke 27 military versions. These are used mainly
    in outdoor conditions in all weather conditions. The 27 does not have all
    the features of the 87, but it is still good for general troubleshooting. I
    believe the 27 will even float! It is water proof.

    Fluke gives excellent warranty plans, and they give excellent service and
    calibration.

    We never buy used test equipment. We found that they need calibration, and
    many times, they were sold used because there were fault conditions.

    Fluke meters are a high quality industry standard.


    Fluke 27:
    http://us.fluke.com/usen/products/F...FlukeUnitedStates&category=HMA(FlukeProducts)

    Fluke 87:
    http://us.fluke.com/usen/products/Fluke80SeriesV.htm


    --

    JANA
    _____


    My trusty Fluke 77, which I've fondly used nearly every day for about 20
    years, is about to give up the ghost. I've already taken it apart and
    repaired it several times over the years, but I get the feeling that it's
    not long for this world. It's giving me warning signals to "abandon ship."
    I do hate to part with it, but it's simply wearing out and it's time to
    upgrade.

    Yeah, I know, I can simply shop on-line or visit local pawn shops and buy
    another. There are plenty of them out there, but I'm not really comfortable
    buying a used meter. Lord knows what's happened to it, and I took good care
    of MINE. And I doubt Fluke is still making 77s. (If I'm wrong, please tell
    me.) I've worked on mine often enough over its lifetime that if I sent it
    to Fluke for real repair and calibration, they'd just laugh and stuff it
    right back in the box and ship it back to me with a note saying "Buy a new
    one." (The store I bought it from, Industrial Electronics, just off
    Montgomery Street in Fort Worth, closed several years ago.) Does Fluke
    offer refurbished models for sale? (Sorry for not checking that in
    advance...)

    The Fluke 77 does everything I need, but there's one feature that I've
    practically never used: Touch-Hold. I mention this because I'm sure Fluke's
    current new crop of digital multimeters can do everything the 77 did, plus
    a great deal more. I don't want anything more than what I've got now; I
    wouldn't use the capacitance test function, or a big LCD scope meter, or a
    USB port, or an automatic dish washer or anything else. I'd just like to
    replace what I've got with something new, be it a new model number or
    whatever.

    There's a Fry's Electronics here in Arlington that carries a lot of good
    test equipment (I bought a Tektronix dual-polarity benchtop power supply
    from them a few years ago on sale because it was a showroom model, and I'm
    still very pleased with it), but I haven't gone shopping there yet because I
    wanted to ask everyone here first: What should I look for in today's Fluke
    DMMs, and which ones should I avoid?

    I'd like to keep the same physical size if at all possible, because the
    original 77 fits snugly into my toolbox (an old ammunition box). I don't
    think anything much bigger would fit in there.

    Now for my next problem: making my old meter fit in my photo album. :)

    Thanks!!!
    Matt J. McCullar, KJ5BA
    Arlington, TX
     
  5. clifto

    clifto Guest

    It's a great feature for those times when you're in tight quarters and/or
    absolutely have to keep your eyes on the test probe while measuring. I
    don't use it every day, but I use it often enough to want it on my next
    meter.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-