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Flashlight Bulbs

Discussion in 'Misc Electronics' started by [email protected], Sep 21, 2006.

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  1. Guest

    This weekend we experienced a power failure, and the bulb on my
    conventional 2 D cell flashlight burned out. Fortunately I had a spare
    PR-2 on hand.

    For a replacement I went to my local hardware store, then Home Depot
    and finally Sears. Surprisingly none of these places today sell
    ordinary PR-2 flashlight bulbs. In desperation, I came from Sears with
    2 HPX20 bulbs, Xenon, which are stated to work with any standard 2
    D-cell flashlight.

    Fortunately I have a good supply of the PR-13 bulbs used in the 6-volt
    lanterns, although the stores do sell the 6-volt batteries for these
    things. I purchase one of the batteries at a cost of about $9.00, while
    the last one I purchased was priced at $3.95.

    Strange world! What the heck is going on?

    Harry C.
     

  2. Try the dollar store!
     
  3. Spamfree

    Spamfree Guest

    For a new flashlight maybe - no dollar store here stocks bulbs.
     
  4. If you won't buy them they won't sell them.
     
  5. Some do - but I suspect a flashlight is cheaper than a bulb at, say, Radio
    Shack!








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  6. Spamfree

    Spamfree Guest

    Yeah, I do believe I must agree with you. Although, I recently bought out a
    radio shack. Got some bulbs in there too!
     
  7. John

    John Guest

    Flashlight bulb?

    Isn't that the century old device that we replace with an LED?

    The replacement LED assembly in my AA Mini MagLite has half the lumens
    of the original krypton bulb, but gives 10 times the battery life -
    and retains the beam focus capability.

    White LEDs are *cheap* - You need a little over 3 volts to operate
    them (fine in the 6volt lantern) and a simple boost circuit for the 3
    volt (2 cell) lights.
    18000mcd 10mm White LED (about the size of the end of a Sharpie
    marker) $8US for 20, including shipping.
    13000mcd 5mm White LED (half that size) are $12US for 100, including
    shipping. www.ledshoppe.com

    At 12 cents each, I'm adding lights to the inside of a closet door
    (one LED for each shelf) and anywhere else the wife wants more light.
    Low voltage (under 5 volts) lighting at 20ma per LED is safe and easy
    to do.

    John
     
  8. Spamfree

    Spamfree Guest

    And they can be a bit "Decorative" too! Many folks are also using those
    little strings of christmas lights more and more for decoration and
    "lighting" - year round............
     
  9. Spamfree

    Spamfree Guest

    I didn't finish my point! Tho this is about "flashlight bulbs" - the strings
    of lights are safe enough to use most anywhere. I'd have to think in an
    Emergency situation if you are fortunate enough to have a "generator" - they
    could be used without sucking all the energy from said generator! Some light
    is better than "none" and those strands don't do too bad of a job.
     
  10. I still have all my shares - damn it.


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    __ ____
    / _| | _ \
    ___ | |_ | |_) | ___ _ __ __ _
    / _ \| _| | _ < / _ \| '__/ _` |
    | (_) | | | |_) | (_) | | | (_| |_
    \___/|_| |____/ \___/|_| \__, (_)
    __/ |
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  11. Guest

    John posted: "Isn't that the century old device that we replace with an
    LED? "

    John, almost but not quite. The LED flahlights are nice, but limited in
    their utility. I'd guess that the problem with them is that they are
    too monochromatic, plus they tend not to throw sufficient lumens. This
    makes them a bad match for practical illumination for a human eyeball.
    :)

    For emegency lighting and close work in dark surrounding, I far prefer
    my old Rayovac flashlight with its PR-2 bulb. For serious power outages
    I still use a Bernzomatic propane lantern with its radioactive gas
    mantle. No homeowner should be without one of these. It provides
    equivalent illumination as the Coleman gasoline powered things, but
    without the mess or the fumes. Mine is still functioning on the
    cylinder of propane that I purchased back around 1975, and you would be
    surprised to learn how often it has been used. (Do they even sell these
    things today?)

    When the electricity has been out for more than 4 hours, it's time to
    haul an old no-name 3-Kw generator out to the driveway and connect it
    to the house with the so called "suicide cord", of course making sure
    that first the main breaker to the house has been turned off. In years
    past this old rig has powered the house for sometimes 3 or 4 days at a
    time (in Fairport, NY during winter). It can get pretty cold in
    Fairport, NY, and many of the furnaces don't run without electricity.
    :)

    As a high-tech guy myself, I learned to distrust modern technology --
    It works great when it works, but in a pinch trust the old tried and
    proven methods.

    Harry C.
     
  12. default

    default Guest

    They still sell them but they have been replaced by fluorescent
    battery power lamps in lots of the stores.

    I use an Aladdin kerosene powered mantle lamp - still sell those too.
     
  13. I guess another argument would be that if there was a nuclear
    electromagnetic pulse (NEMP) event, a conventional bulb is more likely
    to survive than an LED.

    --
    Dave (from the UK)

    Please note my email address changes periodically to avoid spam.
    It is always of the form:
    Hitting reply will work for a few months only - later set it manually.

    http://witm.sourceforge.net/ (Web based Mathematica front end)
     
  14. Another good reason to always wear your aluminium foil beanie,


    --
    _____ _ _
    |_ _| | | | |
    | | __ _ _ __ ___ | |__| | ___ _ __ ___ ___ _ __
    | | / _` | '_ ` _ \ | __ |/ _ \| '_ ` _ \ / _ \ '__|
    _| |_ | (_| | | | | | | | | | | (_) | | | | | | __/ |
    |_____| \__,_|_| |_| |_| |_| |_|\___/|_| |_| |_|\___|_|
    __ ____
    / _| | _ \
    ___ | |_ | |_) | ___ _ __ __ _
    / _ \| _| | _ < / _ \| '__/ _` |
    | (_) | | | |_) | (_) | | | (_| |_
    \___/|_| |____/ \___/|_| \__, (_)
    __/ |
    |___/











    ....

    ....
     
  15. Ever see the white ones? Ever see their spectra? Well, the usual white
    LEDs are not perfect, but they are a good enough kind of "white" to
    improve upon "cool white" fluorescents in terms of color rendering index!
    There are now some that I see as defeating such a claim! Such as most
    and maybe all Pelican "Recoil" models, and for that matter a large
    majority of units having a single LED rated at least "1 watt"? Even the
    Dorcy brand ones I have seen at Target with "1-watt" LEDs? And almost all
    others that rightfully say that the LED is a "Luxeon" one even if they do
    not mention wattage?
    That has not been my experience!
    Drop it when it is on and the bulb has some fair chance of getting
    killed as dead as bugs die in Raid commercials!

    Same for Mag lights with incandescent bulbs, even though the rest of the
    flashlight can probably survive getting over by an 18-wheeler!
    They are now making mantles non-radioactive (and slightly inferior to
    the old ones that were/are only mildly radioactive).
    Meanwhile, I have on hand enough batteries, LEDs, resistors, flashlights
    (mostly LED ones), to not be wanting for light! Just try putting almost
    any Pelican LED model, any model with a "Luxeon" or any other LED at least
    1 watt or even a Lightwave 3000 butt-first into a coffee mug to make a
    nice illuminating spot on the ceiling! It is a step below a gas mantle
    lamp with a propane tank, but what will be reasonably purchasable to put
    in every room that has high cance of desiring light when a bad power
    failure hits?

    An advantage of LED flashlights is that most tend to go into "energy
    conservation mode" when the batteries weaken - especially if the batteries
    are disposable alkalines! When a propane tank gets depleted, it is
    depleted! And incandescent lamps have efficiency decreasing greatly when
    underpowered, and I find this to be the biggest reason why LED flashlights
    (and bicycle lights) can claim so much longer battery runtime!
    I am considering the LED flashlights that have proven themselves to be
    in the cream at the top or close to that to have adequately proven their
    superiority over incandescent ones. Mainly, when batteries weaken, at
    half of full current an incandescent flashlight "lamp" ("bulb") is dimmed
    to in or almost in "cigarette glow" category, while LEDs do not lose
    efficiency that badly when underpowered. Heck, most white LEDs have a
    slight gain in efficiency from mild, moderate and moderately severe
    underpowering!
    Give a white LED 20% of rated current, and look forward to often
    somewhere around 22% of "full" light output! Give your favorite
    krypton-filled incandescent flashlight lamp 20% of "full normal" current,
    and expect light output to be somewhere between "dim side of idling
    cigarette" and that of a cockroach that has endured (but not survived) a
    "Raid" commercial!

    - Don Klipstein ()
     
  16. Guest

    Don, your excellent points are duly noted, but my original question
    remains valid. Which slightly modified reads, given that there of tense
    of millions of 2 D-cell flashights as a market, why are conventional
    PR-2 bulbs no longer generally available, while the batteries
    themselves readily are?

    I suspect that the reason is three-fold. First, the PR-2 bulbs worked
    very well and lasted a long time (unless dropped while burning) -- I
    would guess based on my experience 8-10 years as an average. Second,
    compared to a Krypton bulb, PR-2 bulbs are incredibly cheap when
    available -- Krypton bulbs are expensive (and based again on my
    personal experience) don't last very long. (I've tossed out 3 Krypton
    flashlights because both the flashlights and their bulbs turned out to
    be total crap and unreliable, while like the Energizer Bunny the old
    Rayovac contractor' model flashlight keep going and going! That's why
    all contractors who require a reliable and rugged flashlight keep using
    them). Thirdly, newer is not always better -- This is why contractors,
    utility meter readers, and others who need a reliable flashlight stick
    to the tried and proven old reliables, which mostly use PR-2 bulbs --
    on in the case of 6-volt lanterns the PR-13 version.

    Ask any old design engineer and he/she will likely share with you two
    saying, first "Better is the enemy of good." Second, "If it ain't
    broke, don't fix it!"

    In a flashlight, reliability and dependability is far more important
    that state-of-the-art performance!

    Harry C.
     
  17. John

    John Guest

    I may be a technology geek, but I also believe in"tried and proven"
    backups.
    Coleman dual mantle lantern and a two burner stove (left from the days
    of camping with our kids 20+ years ago).
    Kerosene heater in the basement and about two days worth of fuel
    stored outside.
    The house has two "real" fireplaces (firebrick & masonry, 4 foot wide
    firebox). There's wood for a week or so out under a tarp.
    My wife has a collection of kerosene lamps - all in secure places with
    some fuel in them

    The freezer has a couple of gallon jugs filled with (now frozen)
    water, providing an instant 8lbs each of ice for the refrigerator and
    eventual water for drinking.

    After a couple of days off the grid, I'll probably power an automotive
    alternator from one of the gasoline-powered yard tools to get power to
    charge the laptop battery, the battery for the UPS the keeps the
    network up, and the cell phone...

    John
     
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