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Evidence: CPU FAN spins harder while holding the POWER BUTTON/SWITCH.

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Skybuck The Destroyer, Jun 2, 2007.

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  1. Hello,

    Some people challenge my theory/complaint/observation that holding the
    power button or flipping it/switching it leads to damage.

    I present EVIDENCE:

    HOLDING THE POWER BUTTON INCREASES THE CPU FAN SPEED !

    Natural explanation:

    More speed requires more power !

    Conclusion: MORE POWER IS GOING TO THE MOTHERBOARD SOMEHOW !

    :p*

    STICK THAT UP YOUR BUM !

    Seriously though:

    How do you explain it otherwise ? HMMMMMMM ? Yessss bring on your
    theories/knowledge people... because you looking like crap at the
    moment, saying things like: "power button does not do anything" ! :)

    Bye,
    Skybuck.

    P.S.:

    Yeah, and people from: alt.hardware.pc-homebuilt try not to make a
    complete asshole out of yourself.

    Especially people like Craig Sutton.

    This is after all a semi-serious posting and semi-serious science !

    Your stupid asshole remarks are not appreciated ! Really !

    Asshole remarks are only appreciated if you add a bit off
    knowledgeable flavor to it... see... just like me... otherwise it's
    just being nasty only... but science-nasty that's much better.

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
     
  2. Skybuck

    Skybuck Guest

    Yeah,

    And don't stop just there !

    The backplate fan starts spinning faster too, probably, if my memory
    serves me correctly. I am not gonna repeat the test, way too
    dangerous.

    Other fans were not connected, so it wouldn't surprise me, one bit, if
    everything starts spinning faster !

    Definetly something that should be investigated by asus and other
    motherboard builders !

    This could mean that holding the power button for 10 seconds to power
    it down ACTUALLY DAMAGES IT ! or could damage it on the long run !

    BAD NEWS,

    REALLY BAD NEWS.

    Not gonna do that ever again.

    Next time:

    I simply use the back switch of the power supply.

    SCREW STUPID SOFT POWER ON/OFF SHIT, I HATE IT ;)( IT S STUPID IT S
    DUMB IT S DANGEROUS IT S NOT UNDERSTOOOOD IT SUX.:)

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
     
  3. Also you might think it just spins faster.

    No it doesn't just spin faster.

    It starts spinning faster and faster and faster and faster.

    That seems dangerous, bad, and not by design.

    I am sure now you understand just perfectly >=D

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
     
  4. John Larkin

    John Larkin Guest


    Many modern pc's have speed-controlled fans, so that they can adjust
    the cooling as needed and not make a lot of howling noise all of the
    time. They also have fans that give a "running" feedback signal. The
    BIOS manages the fans based on cmos settings and/or actual chip
    temperatures. Most such systems set the fans to max by default, often
    powering up full blast and throttling down later after other stuff is
    set up.

    "Faster and faster and faster" is really just ramping up to 100% on.

    My HP has redundant fans. Both are monitored for speed. If one fails,
    the other starts up. Whichever is in use is throttled to provide
    proper cooling, as needed, but low noise. The fans run full-on for a
    few seconds at powerup. The advantage of buying a fully-built PC is
    that all this stuff is designed in and the hardware and bios
    (redundant bios! and raid drives! and ecc memory!) take care of
    things.

    Relax.

    John
     
  5. Skybuck

    Skybuck Guest

    Yeah so big deal, tell me something I don't know.

    I have sorta two redundant fans:

    Power supply fan, and back plate fan <- does heavy work, if it fails,
    power fan takes over.

    That still doesn't explain my observed behaviour.

    I tried to recreate the sticky button and fan thingy... but recreating
    these problems is pretty hard.

    I can now kinda understand why the sticky button problem escaped
    attention... it happens on rarely situations... not under ideal
    circumstances or even less circumstances... it's just one of those
    things that only show up during "real world usage". That's the shitty
    part about it.

    I tried a second time recreating the fan thingy... but now only the
    cpu fan is connected... backplate is now disconnected... at the time
    it was connected... didn't hear the cpu fan spindle faster the second
    time... but I know what I heard the first time ;)

    I am not gonna do asus's job that's for sure... let them figure it
    out :p*

    I am just here to complain about it and hint at possible short
    comings.

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
     
  6. I think that you need to increase the size of your tinfoil hat.

    Nicholas Sherlock
     
  7. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    Bollocks. This behaviour is quite normal.

    Buy yourself an inexpensive little voltmeter.
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/EW-Mini-DIGIT...6QQihZ018QQcategoryZ58277QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

    Graham
     
  8. Tom

    Tom Guest

    As some one pointed out the CPU fan and possibly the general fans &
    PSU fan (dependent upon age and cost of system) are controlled by the
    motherboard. Also as stated most systems fire up with the fans going
    full tilt, or at least working their way up to full tilt, then at some
    point the motherboard takes over and spins them down to a speed
    suitable for maintaining a comfortable temp.

    The reason for starting full whack, might be because the control
    circuits responsible aren't activated at the beginning, however there
    is another reason. I recall reading somewhere that the CPU is running
    at 100%, despite doing naff all, at power on, so it will be heating up
    nicely, hence having the fan going full tilt initially is probably a
    good idea.

    Tom
     
  9. Skybuck

    Skybuck Guest

    This is well known and observed behaviour.

    What I observed was probably different.

    First fans spinning at full speed and then started spinning extra
    faster and faster.

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
     
  10. Bob

    Bob Guest

    I have a theory that variable speed computer fans are deliberately
    operated at full power when the computer is switched on to
    increase the chance of the fan starting to spin when it is a year
    old, clogged with dust and the cheap bearing has much more frication.

    Bob
     
  11. Skybuck

    Skybuck Guest

    Thanks for this theory.

    The CPU fan does not seem to be spinning at full speed.

    It's spinning rather slowly.

    This could indicate "fan control" failure, whatever is controlling the
    cpu fan has died.

    Bios perhaps ?

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
     
  12. Pieter

    Pieter Guest

    The best way to investigate is trying it out!

    So I will give it a try now. Lets see, the power button. I am going to
    press it now.

    One second, I see a window "shut down", 2 seconds now, 3 seconds now,
    and now 4 seco
     
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