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Everything but Net! (very long, but I think not offensive)

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Rich Grise, Feb 4, 2004.

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  1. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    I just couldn't resist the play-on-words. I thought of "Born-again
    Newbie,"
    amongst others, even one that gets right to the point, except that
    that subject
    line would be almost as long as the body of an ordinary question post.
    I'm not
    new to Linux - just to toot my own horn, I'm now sitting at the
    computer I
    bought in 1996 or so (at least that's the BIOS's date) for US$999.00,
    with
    an IBM/Cyrix 6x86P150+, 32 MB RAM, 3 GB /dev/hda, 4GB C: (.5), D:
    (2.0), &
    E (1.5) drive, Win95 on C:, Win2000 on D:, E: just vfat; 256MB swap &
    2.5G /.
    Running Slack 8.1 that I just d/l'd from one of the mirrors as iso,
    and since
    vehicle (the computer's name) doesn't boot from CD - heck, it has to
    load a
    device driver before it even _sees_ the CD - yes, you can install from
    the
    iso disk after booting with bare.i, install.1, ... install.5. Just to
    set the
    mood for what I'm about to say, let me mention that up until very
    recently,
    I was without any computing ability at all, at least for enough years
    that
    I had Slack 3.something that I had downloaded floppy by floppy at 56K.
    :)
    But I got away from everything for awhile, and recently had a dream
    gig fall
    like manna from the sky - I actually have 3 computers in my office.
    There's
    a kinda diagram of what I have at
    http://home.earthlink.net/~entheos_engineering/images/ABI_Entheos_LAN.gif
    if
    you're not on a sexu^H^H^H^Htextual browser, like links, like I am.
    After all
    that time away from the innards of the computer, and sitting here,
    wondering
    how I can look at the NG list and keep a post open simultaneously,
    duh, alt-F2.
    I'm almost having an orgasm. It's like I was 45 again. ;-)
    Anyway, I have another computer, thunderbird, that I got from ebay
    recently:
    Athlon 1000, 256MB, 60 GB, SiS900 internal NIC, an ebay "4-port
    Router" card,
    which calls itself an "ASOUND INTERNAL Nway Switch AL500P Ver1.0", W2K
    calls an
    ADMTek AN983, and Redmon^H^H^Hhat reports as a DEC something or other,
    with
    a punctuation mark or two in the name, and otherwise won't talk to it;
    and
    just now, when I installed 9.1 off the ahem bought disk set ;-), the
    install
    program reported only one NIC, and said that it was loading tulip.o.
    This is
    a module, that gets loaded with the kernel, rather than a package,
    which are
    apps, right? This is confusing, because I don't remember Slack 8
    saying anything
    like that on vehicle. I also either haven't yet read or missed the
    part about
    how do I get my nic to tell me its name? Obviously, the ebay NIC is
    working
    fine (BTW, I've got DSL.) ifconfig is normal - my IP is 192.168.0.84,
    because
    thunderbird is running DHCP in W2K, apparently. But how do you look up
    a
    question like "how do I find out what my ethernet card calls itself
    when the OS
    calls?" But that's just for curiosity. Hmmm... I'm learning stuff as I
    go along.
    I just pinged myself, and got 127.0.0.1. So I have to go into the
    config
    files for all that stuff. I shouldn't be daunted, because last
    millennium
    I had 4 virtual hosts going simultaneously, and had made at least one
    of
    them appear in public, hand-configuring all the apache stuff. Boy,
    those
    were the days!
    But I ramble. To get to the question: I loaded Redmon^H^H^Hhat 9.0
    from two
    different books, and 8.0 from "Redhat Linux for Dummies" - A few
    months ago,
    when I got the green light to set up a server on my own computer, I
    dediced
    to go for Linux, duh. But I figured there must be something more
    recent, that
    might work on my new computer (at the time) - that's the third one,
    entheos-ws1,
    with an Athlon 2400+, 512M, 80G, all W2k. I use Autocad. I'm a
    contractor.
    If anybody offers to pay me $3.95/day to look, I have a webcam. ;-) So
    anyway, I decided to do it "the easy way," and get a book. Looking at
    downloading a modern distro is like, yah, right. But Borders didn't
    have
    Slackware with a book. In fact, I thought that the disk set would come
    with
    a book - it must be on them. I also still have the 3.3 book and CDs.
    It's
    an embarrassment of riches. Sorry.
    So, anyway, I don't like Redmon^H^H^Hhat, and RH9's X is giving me
    some kind
    of screen glitch, so, like I said, it's Slack Time. I feel like I'm
    home
    again. ;-)

    But here's where I need some help - How do I start troubleshooting the
    network
    stuff in Slack 9.1? The only time I see any reference to the NIC is
    during
    setup, when it says something arcane about installing tulip.o (did I
    mention
    that)? There must be some kind of probing tools and something akin to
    a howto
    so I can get those NICs going like they're supposed to, but I don't
    know where
    to start to look for something which, for all I know at the moment, is
    probably
    as simple as turning on a switch somewhere. But all the RTFMs, books,
    websites,
    &c seem to cover everything but that. Or I haven't yet discovered
    where to look.
    It's kind of like finding a needle in a haystack, but there's a
    possiblity that
    the needle has been ground up and strewn haphazardly through the
    stack, and
    there's 3 different kinds of hay! Sorry for sniveling.

    Anyways, everything other than that is cool - I just had a thought - I
    don't
    specifically remember if the one NIC that Slack sees in thunderbird
    got on
    line or not, and I don't want to reboot, because I'd lose _this_
    connection.
    So, anybody got a link just busting from their frontal lobe as to how
    to go
    at this?

    Well, my next post will hopefully be a followup to this one, from one
    comp.
    or the other!

    Thanks!
    Rich
     
  2. Rich Grise wrote:

    Try cat /proc/pci

    Richard :)
     
  3. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Naturally, right after hitting "Send" is when the answer
    happens. /dev/cdrom/slackware-book/Slack8Book.html#_Toc5179744,
    "Chapter 5. Network Configurationsaying, "Google won't
    post to alt.os.linux.slackware, so would somebody repost this
    to there?", but having found exactly what I was looking for
    within seconds of posting, I realized that that'd be a little
    em-bare-ass-ing. :)

    I'm posting by google because the dipshits at Verizon don't
    have the newsserver activated yet.

    Thanks!
    Rich
     
  4. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Hi everybody!

    Naturally, 5 seconds after posting this long post, I bothered to go to
    /mnt/cdrom/slackware-book/Slack8Book.html, and lo and behold!

    Chapter 5. Network Configuration

    Boy, that RTFM stuff is pretty cool!

    I really don't mind hand-configuring stuff, as long as I've got the
    instructions right in front of my nose. ;-)

    Plus, I REALLY REALLY LOVE knowing precisely what my
    machinery is doing. That W2K crap, and even, to a slightly
    lesser extent, Redmon^H^H^Hhat, do so much automatic stuff
    that I never know if some secret thing is going to come up and
    bite me when I'm not looking!

    Thanks for letting me rave. :)

    I LOVE SLACKWARE!

    Cheers!
    Rich
     
  5. Ron Matthews

    Ron Matthews Guest

    Yes, but you aren't learning what your machine is doing. You're
    simply learning an abstract model of what your machine is doing.
    The fact that the Windoze abstract model is easier to learn is a
    point in it's favour. The fact that the linux abstract model of
    what the computer is doing is harder to learn is because it is 25
    years old. With linux, esp. slackware, you are setting all kinds
    of switches that don't even exist with windows and yet windows
    rolls right along quite nicely without them, all alone at the top
    of the world.

    The _only_ professional reason linux exists is because windows only
    has a gui and a gui, in some respects, gets in the way of a server.

    cordially, as always,

    rm
     
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