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Engineering Mathematics

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by tuurbo46, Aug 17, 2004.

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  1. tuurbo46

    tuurbo46 Guest

    Hi

    Im about to start my last year at uni and im trying to find a good web
    site that will consider answering some mind bending maths questions in
    fourier series, z-transforms and laplace. A few times last year i
    struggled on some elements and i didnt know were to ask.

    Before you say, why dosnt your teacher help. I will fill you in on how
    maths is taught at our uni. When you approach the teachers, they say,
    degrees are to be read and not taught. As a result of this our maths
    prof is part time and only teaches at the uni 2 hours a week.

    I look forward to any advise you guys can offer.

    Thanks, an English student being ripped off by the system!!
     
  2. Mantra

    Mantra Guest

    Sounds like those supposed "teachers" don't answer because they don't
    actual know or understand the subject well enough themselves, which is
    a bit scary but depressingly common.

    A google query comes back with quite a few decent sites - sort of
    depends on the specific question in mind...

    MM
     
  3. Wim Lewis

    Wim Lewis Guest

    You might try asking over in the sci.math hierarchy. I don't read it
    though so I don't know what groups would be appropriate, etc..

    Mathworld.wolfram.com has a lot of encyclopedia-style articles on
    mathematical subjects:
    http://mathworld.wolfram.com/LaplaceTransform.html
    http://mathworld.wolfram.com/FourierTransform.html
    http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Z-Transform.html

    Wikipedia is also sometimes a good place to look ( http://en.wikipedia.org/ ).
    It has articles on all these subjects.

    I also recommend the book _Digital Filters_, 3rd edition, by R W Hamming
    (that's "the" Hamming). I found it to be very illuminating. It has
    a good coverage of theory and practical things.
    What a crock!
     
  4. Bob Masta

    Bob Masta Guest

    If you want a low-math introduction to the Fourier stuff, take
    a look at my "Gut-Level Fourier Transforms" series. It ran
    originally on the ChipCenter E-zine, but I also have all the
    articles on my site at <www.daqarta.com/author.htm>

    There is additional, overlapping stuff in the Daqarta Help
    system, starting at <www.daqarta.com/0t0ifft1.htm>

    Hope this helps!


    Bob Masta
    dqatechATdaqartaDOTcom

    D A Q A R T A
    Data AcQuisition And Real-Time Analysis
    www.daqarta.com
     
  5. tuurbo46

    tuurbo46 Guest



    Thanks, your links look very helpful. I will have a good read of them tonight.

    :0)
     
  6. Roy McCammon

    Roy McCammon Guest

    be a proactive educational consumer.
    if you have a specific question, you can ask it here.
     
  7. Andyb

    Andyb Guest

    K.A. Stroud got me through my whole engineering degree with his "Engineering
    Mathematics" and "Further Engineering Mathematics" text books. His style is
    pretty much to present lecture course slides with commentary and worked
    examples. The books are probably in your university library. Other than
    that, www.mathworld.com is pretty comprehensive.

    Best of luck,

    Andy
     
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