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Emitter design for negative ion generators...

Discussion in 'Misc Electronics' started by KILOWATT, Dec 7, 2003.

  1. KILOWATT

    KILOWATT Guest

    Hi thanks to read. I wish to design a negative ion generator.
    Two questions remains yet:
    1-Whats the best emitter design for those? Simply a sharp needle is enough
    or does a good design asks for many needles to have a better output?
    If you check this link, they seem to have a very good emitter design.
    http://www.negativeiongenerators.com/images/CFEmittercloseup.jpg
    They claim the following:
    "The long-life CFE ion emitter used in this model is made from a high-tech,
    space-age material that is virtually maintenance-free. The CFE emitter
    requires no trimming, since the diameter of the fibers is almost
    microscopically small (only 0.8 microns). The CFE simply plugs into the
    ionizer as shown."

    Any thoughts about that?

    2- What's the best voltage? Do i simply use the highest possible voltage
    that will not produce a significant amount of ozone?
    TIA
    --
    Alain(alias:Kilowatt)
    Montréal Québec
    PS: 1000 excuses for errors or omissions,
    i'm a "pure" french canadian! :)
    Come to visit me at: http://kilowatt.camarades.com
    (If replying also by e-mail, remove
    "no spam" from the adress.)
     
  2. I have a commercial bionair HEPA filter with an ionizer that uses a single
    needle.
    I think if you need a special electrode like the one in the link, you are
    probably producing too many ions for regular use in an occupied room. I'm
    not a big believer in the benefits of negative ions, and I'm sure it's
    possible to do harm with too high a concentration.

    I would think that around 4-5kV on a single stainless steel needle would be
    fine. If you can hear it hissing in a quiet room it's working, and if you
    can smell it, it's producing ozone.
     
  3. N. Thornton

    N. Thornton Guest

    Use some spikes and ignore the bullshit. Just remember what youre trying to achieve.

    Emitters dont need trimming btw.


    Regards, NT
     
  4. Ian Stirling

    Ian Stirling Guest

    I'm guessing (not looked at link) that they are talking about carbon fiber.
    "Carbon Fiber Electrode" ?
    There are various sellers selling raw carbon fiber on ebay, for little money.
     
  5. Gary Lecomte

    Gary Lecomte Guest

    One or two needles is quite satisfactory.
    Ideal voltages are between 4,500 to 5,000 volts.
    Voltages greater than 5000 volts creates large amounts of OZONE. This
    can be Very Dangerous!

    Take care..........Gary
     
  6. KILOWATT

    KILOWATT Guest

    Thanks to all of you for the replies...was appreciated. Yesterday i've
    bought a ready-made air purifier based on negative ions technology. It's not
    that i'm too lazy to build one myself, but i couldn't resist when i saw it.
    I was shopping for a humidifier and went out of the store not only with a
    humidifier but with this ionizer! Was all air quality-related expenses,
    finally :)
    http://www3.sympatico.ca/kilo.watt/images/ionizer.jpg

    I've saw the product a few years ago on TV and believe me, after 36hours of
    operation, let me say that it works! The surrounding collector band is
    positively charged to attract the dust that have been negatively charged
    with the negative ions (from three needle that acts as the emitters...they
    didn't used CFE emitters like on the website you've seen on the link in my
    previous post). It collected a lot of dust already wich seems promising.
    Ian...you're probably right about the defenition of "CFE". Even if they
    don't specify the material, they state: "The long-life CFE ion emitter used
    in this model is made from a high-tech, space-age material that is virtually
    maintenance-free." Theese days, when we speak about space age material,
    carbon fiber is often mentioned. I don't know the voltages used for the one
    i've bought, but it produce very little ozone...only a slight odour is
    noticeable whithin a feet from the unit.

    If the unit still continue to work correctly in a few days, i think that i
    will sneak inside to check the circuitry. I don't have a high voltage probe,
    but they probably use the inexpensive and common diodes/capacitors voltage
    multiplier method. By measuring the 1st stage's voltage(wich is under 1000V
    most of the time) and checking the number of diodes used, i'll be able to
    estimate the output voltages, both for the positive (collector band) and the
    negative (ions emitting points). Thanks again...i'll keep in touch within
    this thread.
    --
    Alain(alias:Kilowatt)
    Montréal Québec
    PS: 1000 excuses for errors or omissions,
    i'm a "pure" french canadian! :)
    Come to visit me at: http://kilowatt.camarades.com
    (If replying also by e-mail, remove
    "no spam" from the adress.)
     
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