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Electronics Moron Needs Help

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Ratrodsrule1, Apr 26, 2020.

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  1. Ratrodsrule1

    Ratrodsrule1

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    Apr 26, 2020
    I have an ancient 395 type 5 Dremel that's been a trooper. However even it's slowest variable speed is still way too fast for a particular new interest hobby task. Is there a variable speed widget that could be hard wired into the supply cord to slow it down even more or would that ruin the dremel from low voltage ?

    Thanks in advance for any info
     
  2. Nanren888

    Nanren888

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    Nov 8, 2015
    Gearbox?
    .
    Never tried to "dim" a Dremel.
    Will the load be constant?
     
  3. Ratrodsrule1

    Ratrodsrule1

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    Apr 26, 2020
    No Sir, it would be used to polish .091,2 ,3 diameter Pinewood derby racing axles to a mirror finish. The dremel lowest speed is entirely to fast for this task. I've just discovered there are plug in controllers with a plug in outlet which would avoid any hard wiring. See if you think this would work please.https://www.harborfreight.com/router-speed-control-43060.html BTW the dremel has a brush type motor.
    Thanks.......RRR
     
  4. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    I have a similar unit to this only 220v version for here in Aus.
    I would hesitate to plug this unit into a triac controller as the dremel already has an internal speed regulator.
    Even if one were to set this internal speed control to maximum and the regulate via external new unit, bad things might happen.

    All a little academic anyhow when one reads through page 3 ( difficult but readable).
    http://powertool.manualsonline.com/manuals/mfg/dremel/395.html?p=3

    In there it explains how the design of the Dremel series motor is for.......... high speed......... and .........low torque.
    In a nutshell, load it up at any low speed and due to it's low torque, it'll more than likely stall or at least slow down to the point where it cooks the guts out of it.

    Better to use some form of cheap battery drill I'd imagine.
    Or if you want mains connected appliance, a $20 motorised egg whisk or whatever from Kmart with a chuck bolted on one end.
    Certainly wouldn't subject my Dremel to such a fate.
    Had to initially wait for years to be able to afford one in the first place, and then, don't like to see good gear misused.
     
  5. Ratrodsrule1

    Ratrodsrule1

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    Apr 26, 2020
    Thanks Sir. Been using a drill as you described. Will probably save the dremel for its intended use. Thanks Again !!
     
  6. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    No worries,
    Curious though, what is a " .091,2 ,3 diameter Pinewood derby racing axles ".
    Heard many years ago about full race chrome dipsticks but never the axles.:):)
     
  7. Ratrodsrule1

    Ratrodsrule1

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    Apr 26, 2020
    They come in different diameters depending on the bore size of your wheels. The vid will give the basics of the process including your drill idea which is what I am using currently LOL
     
  8. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    Hehehe...ok...fair enough.:):)

    These days I make bits like that in the lathe BUT there were times when I didn't have a lathe.
    Those days I'd use some emery tape with the bits held in vice grips and my number 10 firmly planted on the top using the steps of the house.
    Actually emery tape still used for polishing in the lathe BUT very very fine.
    More in the form of 3/4 worn out w&d auto sandpaper on what we affectionately call a "magic stick".
    Square section of 20mm pine timber with sandpaper glued on.
     
  9. bertus

    bertus Moderator

    2,056
    776
    Nov 8, 2019
    Hello,

    Looking at the manual, speed 1 is 500 RPM.

    Bertus
     

    Attached Files:

  10. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

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    Aug 21, 2015
    Considering that your sequence of silicon carbide polishing strips might have went on up to the 1000 grit . .or so of fineness . . . .
    And THEN the final polish of chucking it in the drill and use of a demin/blue jean cloth wetted with BRASSO and finger pinched to the shaft when final polishing . . . you will end up with a "chromed" surface.
    And then there is the final end use of inserting its wheel on the axle and the use of a drop of silicone OIL ( not grease) as your wheel to axle lubricant. Will end up as a combination as slick as greased owl sh*t.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2020
    bushtech likes this.
  11. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    If the wheels are plastic hub, perhaps some conduit "slippery lube" ....... o_O
     
  12. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Jun 21, 2012
    Don't youse guys wish ya were Cub Scouts again? With today's technology to "soup up" yer Pinewood Derby entries?:D

    As a Dad, I enjoyed one year helping to re-build a derby race track that was set up in the basement of a neighborhood church. Neither of my sons were interested in becoming Scouts, though. Probably a "good thing" too, as no doubt wife would have been hit up to become a "den mother". And my job would have been baking a ton or so of cookies for meetings.
     
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