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Electronics book

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by ElectronicPotatoe, Dec 17, 2016.

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  1. ElectronicPotatoe

    ElectronicPotatoe

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    Dec 17, 2016
    I am looking for a book that is not too advanced and not for beginners. I have a really good math, physics and chemistry base (I am an engineering student, almost finishing my studies, not related to electronics though). I know about transistors, diodes, power supplies, transformers, rectifiers, all the basic noob stuff. But, of course, I want more.

    I must admit I didn't read the sticky carefully, so if there is something there just call me some names and then tell me :).

    I am looking for something more advanced. A book that covers timers and whatever follows timers and whatever follows what follows timers.

    Thanks a lot!
     
  2. chopnhack

    chopnhack

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    Since you have the background you might appreciate Grob's Basic Electronics, just fast forward to chapter 21 or 22 where they start to discuss RC circuits. You might also find The Art of Electronics helpful as it is more geared towards the application of electronics and how to use devices in circuit.

    What is your major?
     
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  3. ElectronicPotatoe

    ElectronicPotatoe

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    Dec 17, 2016
    Hi, and thanks for the info! I'll definitely check those. It's industrial engineering by the way. Nothing to do with electronics. I'm actually thinking I may have chosen the wrong field haha. Oh and also give studied RC circuits in physics already.

    I was thinking about something that covers, for example timers. I've seen some designs but I've never really understood (not that I tried either) the logic behind their developement and applications. Do you know about something that covers similar topics or something that would help me understand them? Thanks a lot!
     
  4. chopnhack

    chopnhack

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    When you mention timers, the beginning of timers are r-c circuits. After that it would proceed to IC based timers like the 555 timer. There is a really good website on the 555, http://www.doctronics.co.uk/555.htm

    As for majors, its certainly not too late! If you are still in school you presumably have no wife, kids, mortgage, etc. If you really enjoy electronics, having your core curricula nearly finished, you could easily double major with a few more years. Think of what doors that might open to someone with both fields covered ;-) Besides, you can prototype an electrical circuits far faster than building a mechanical machine :D
     
  5. ElectronicPotatoe

    ElectronicPotatoe

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    Dec 17, 2016
    Thank very helpful! I'll definitely check that website!

    You don't know of any books about them? You know something more transistor-based? By no means I'm trying to say your help isn't useful. I'll check out everything you mentioned. Thanks again!

    About my major, while true it would help my CV, it's almost of no use to me. My job is mostly to design factories (industries) and take care of the human and economical side of things. I wish it was about designing machines! In my country the say "the best accountant amongst engineers and the best engineer amongst accountants" (I'm sure I got the translation wrong but you get the idea).
     
  6. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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  7. chopnhack

    chopnhack

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    Apr 28, 2014
    I am not sure what you mean by transistor based timers, unless of course you mean microcontrollers! Then I do know some little about those ;-)

    I think I understand what you mean re: your major. Engineer, but with the logistics side of the major. Perhaps like six sigma, best work practice and design for such?
     
  8. ElectronicPotatoe

    ElectronicPotatoe

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    Dec 17, 2016
    Oh boy am I dumb! I saw the datasheet of the Intel 4004 (I think it was the 4004, although all the datasheets seem unfamiliar now. I remember a transistor maze but now I cant seem to find anything like it) and somehow it got into my brain as the 555 timer. You are right, timers are like the children of the multivibrator and the flip flop! (right?).

    And yes, logistics is a big part of what I do. I actually forgot about it! And Six Sigma is basically what my career is all about, and processes like it of course.
     
  9. chopnhack

    chopnhack

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    I guess you could say that.

    Here is a good link, check out the left side, there is a link to the original schematic hand drawn by the looks of it by Mr. F. Faggin!!
     
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  10. ElectronicPotatoe

    ElectronicPotatoe

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    Dec 17, 2016
    Holy Holy Spirit! What a genius. That guy should have the world biggest statue and his life should be taught in high school.

    Well looking at that diagram then that's definitely not what I saw. Now that I think about it, I saw an amplifier. The LM741 to be precise. Now I remember. Great. Now that we got that out of the way, is there an unified book or something where I can learn more about this things (timers, amplifiers, microprocessors) ir is that field way too big to cover in one book. I just wan to learn the basics of it all. I'm not that greedy ;).
     
  11. chopnhack

    chopnhack

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  12. ElectronicPotatoe

    ElectronicPotatoe

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    Dec 17, 2016
  13. chopnhack

    chopnhack

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    Apr 28, 2014
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  14. ElectronicPotatoe

    ElectronicPotatoe

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    Dec 17, 2016
    Yes but I'm not sure about that price. It's the LA page (Latin America), since I'm from Argentina. Is it u$s100? Seems kind of expensive.
     
  15. chopnhack

    chopnhack

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    Yes, it was $100 U.S. - a bit much for such an old title! I think it was from the 70's.
     
  16. NMNeil

    NMNeil

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  17. ElectronicPotatoe

    ElectronicPotatoe

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    Dec 17, 2016
    Ok since the last time I´ve been poking around universities and checking out the books they used. This is what I found (they are pretty math and physic hungry, messing around with integrals, a bit much math to be honest, but here they are):

    - Fundamentals of Microelectronics (Razavi)

    - Analysis and Desing of Analog integrated Circuits (Gray-Meyer)

    Both are very well fundamented and cover mostly amplifiers, with a little introduction about semiconductors transistors and diodes. What do you think about them?
     
  18. chopnhack

    chopnhack

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    http://www.csun.edu/~acm31201/Old Class Work/ECE 340/Fundamentals of Microelectronics.pdf
    Well, what can we say, its a college text :)
    https://www.u-cursos.cl/usuario/955...of_Analog_Integrated_Circuits_5th_cropped.pdf
    Same here, I guess you can use them as resources to look up the theory behind operation. They are fairly stale by themselves. You might want to find something that has a practical side, i.e. some hands on. At least, for me, it works better that way.
     
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