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electromagnetic gyroscope

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by davidbenjamindix, Jan 3, 2011.

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  1. davidbenjamindix

    davidbenjamindix

    21
    0
    Feb 25, 2010
    i want to build a magnetic gyroscope. this video is really interesting, but i don't understand the components involved.
    YouTube - one magnet no-bearing "magnetic gyroscope"

    it seems the primary gyroscope is in some type of perpetual motion due to the 'magnetic motor??' next to it. it continues to spin at apparently the same speed after the power source was removed. can someone explain this to me. i have 1/2" x 1/8" Neodymium N45 magnets at home, and would very much like to build one of these for my walnut lockbox, which have posted a few threads on already.

    i would like to operate a gyroscope with a little power as possible, and able to start it from a stationary position to full speed without making physical human contact. e.g. when opening a door, or turning on a switch, the gyroscope begins spinning and lifts to it's idle position.
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,258
    2,705
    Jan 21, 2010
    OK, firstly, "gyroscope" and "perpetual motion" have specific meanings. It isn't the first, and it can't be the latter.

    I'm nor sure how you make these motors start. I think that one of their weaknesses is that they can't self-start.
     
  3. Resqueline

    Resqueline

    2,848
    1
    Jul 31, 2009
    If I found the same vid as you: there is a super-capacitor there that obviously continues to drive the motor after the battery is disconnected.
    Another thing is that the magnet rotor is bigger and heavier than the little toy gyro, thereby having an inherent tendency to spin longer.
    Notice it's not possible to discern the speed of these things on a vid.
    I see nothing exciting about these motors, They're not self-starting, and they can't be very efficient because of the large distance between the coil(s) and the magnet(s).

    The Hartmann magnetic motor on the other hand seems very interesting, since it apparently defies "something" by not requiring any driving or startup power..
    If only someone would build that, and prove that it works.. ;)
     
  4. davidbenjamindix

    davidbenjamindix

    21
    0
    Feb 25, 2010
    im scrapping this idea. it was pointless to begin with. thanks for your replies.
     
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