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Electrical vs magnetic field

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Peter, Dec 31, 2003.

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  1. Peter

    Peter Guest

    I am having trouble understanding the difference between magnetic field and
    an electrical field. I thought they were the same but as I start to study
    for a ham license I am reading different.

    Pierre
     
  2. Charges give off electric fields in all directions. Moving charges
    wrap themselves in magnetic fields (around the axis of movement).


    Electric fields produce forces between charges. Magnetic fields
    produce forces between charges moving relative to one another.
     
  3. An electrical field is produced by an object with charge
    (attraction/repulsion).

    A magnetic field is produced by a *moving* object with charge.

    Don
     
  4. Peter

    Peter Guest

    Thanks a lot. I think I get it.
     
  5. Guest

    | An electrical field is produced by an object with charge
    | (attraction/repulsion).
    |
    | A magnetic field is produced by a *moving* object with charge.

    Or by moving past an object with a charge.
     
  6. They're also called "electrostatic" fields, but of course there
    is no requirement that they be constant and unchanging.

    If you sprinkle iron filings on paper over a bar magnet, then
    they line up and you can see the flux lines of magnetic field.

    If you sprinkle grass seed on oil over some high voltage
    electrodes then they line up and you can see the flux lines
    of electric field.

    The energy stored in an inductor takes the form of a magnetic
    field. The energy stored in a capacitor takes the form of an
    electric field.

    Radio waves are partly made of electric fields, partly made
    of magnetic fields (that's why we call them EM fields.)

    Note: electric fields are essentially "made" of voltage spread
    over distance. There is a weak electric field in the space around
    the terminals of a 9V battery. There is a strong electric field
    around a rubber balloon which you've recently rubbed upon your
    hair.
     
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