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Electric Shock Toy?

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Andrew Edmond, Oct 18, 2003.

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  1. When I was a kid, I read a schemetic in a magazine that showed how to
    make a shock machine out of a transformer, a capacitor, a 9V battery
    and a push/release switch. At age 12 I was able to build one and had
    a great time shocking my friends (small but still startling).

    At age 14, I built an electric chair (a living room chair with foil
    wrapped on the arms, with a push button to deliver the shock) for
    halloween.

    At age 30, I'm trying to recall how I did it as a kid, and am having
    tons of trouble :)

    Any electrician minded people willing to help me with this halloween
    project?

    If I remember correctly, I hooked the leads of the 9V battery to the
    transformer (120V / 12.6V 1.2A transformer) and then hooked the leads
    on the other end of the transformer to a small capacitor (pinky tip
    sized cylinder). From the capacitor I hooked one lead through a push
    button switch and the other lead on an open circuit. Each lead
    terminated in a standard kitchen knife.

    The net effect is that you'd hold the kitchen knives as easy-grip
    conductors and then push the button. The current from the capacitor
    would be released into your body offering a small but shocking jolt.

    When I did it as an electric chair when I was a kid it was so much fun
    on Halloween!

    If anybody might be able to give me some pointers for refreshing my
    memory on this, I'd be much obliged!

    Andrew

    PS: Please cc edmond at aravia.com. Thanks!!
     
  2. Joe Legris

    Joe Legris Guest

    It's politically incorrect to shock people these days. Even lethal
    injections have lost their charm. Pre-killed victims are your best bet.
     
  3. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

    ---
    Apparently you've forgotten that memeory loss due to electroshock is
    irreversible.

    What you'll need to do is to learn how to perform the experiments again,
    from scratch, and then practice them on yourself to make sure they're
    "safe".

    However, once you practice them on yourself, if you find that you can't
    quite figure out what those kitchen knives you're clutching are for,...
     
  4. Si Ballenger

    Si Ballenger Guest

    The below kit might be of interest. Something simple that can
    generate a shock is the flash part of a disposable flash cam
    (been there, done that!).

    http://www.qkits.com/serv/qkits/diy/pages/FK901.asp
     
  5. Si Ballenger

    Si Ballenger Guest

    But what if you have been bad, bad, bad, and want to be shocked?
    ;-)
     
  6. N. Thornton

    N. Thornton Guest

    Umm, why do I think thats going to be a 'no' ?

    Regards, NT
     
  7. See what happened because of all the shocks you gave yourself? You've
    lost your memory! Hah-hah.

    There was a young lady who lived in the apts across the courtyard who
    told me she had electroshock treatments when she was younger. She
    said there were whole segments of her life of which she couldn'r
    remember anyting.
    --
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    ###Got a Question about ELECTRONICS? Check HERE First:###
    http://users.pandora.be/educypedia/electronics/databank.htm
    My email address is whitelisted. *All* email sent to it
    goes directly to the trash unless you add NOSPAM in the
    Subject: line with other stuff. alondra101 <at> hotmail.com
    Don't be ripped off by the big book dealers. Go to the URL
    that will give you a choice and save you money(up to half).
    http://www.everybookstore.com You'll be glad you did!
    Just when you thought you had all this figured out, the gov't
    changed it: http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
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  8. Tim Jackson

    Tim Jackson Guest

    That works but you will need a resistor to discharge the capacitor so that
    it will fire again the next time the button is pressed.

    When I was a kid (a lot more than 20 years ago I am afraid) we used a buzzer
    circuit ( for the uninitiated that's a relay with its n/c contact in series
    with the coil) to generate a continuous shocking voltage. In your design
    you will need to keep the capacitor small enough to ensure that the device
    is medically safe, at 15VA your transformer is a too large to provide
    protection itself. We used custom 'shocking coils', or wound our own.

    Tim Jackson
     
  9. Michael

    Michael Guest

    I've made heaps of shockers with relays when I was a kid too, and had
    a lot of fun with them. The last one I made worked so well it was
    impossible to let go of. Another good shocker is the generator used
    in old fashioned telephones.
    Just watch out for old people with weak hearts. Be careful.
     
  10. Andrew Crook

    Andrew Crook Guest

    the Victorians used to pay for a shock, it used to be the answer for
    anything. I even heard that roman emperors used to use electric eels to
    treat things ... headaches :)

    Andi
     

  11. As do we, albeit for fewer disorders: severe depression, heart seizure,
    chronic pain, muscle atrophy, and if memory serves (no jokes about
    depression here, now), epilepsy.

    Hmm, I'm struggling with a cold. Mebbe I'll go give it a try.
     
  12. Ted Wilson

    Ted Wilson Guest

    My understanding is that Electric Shock Treatment was introduced as a
    treatment for severe depression on the basis that epileptics rarely,
    if ever, suffer from depression: an epileptic attack is an
    uncontrolled electrical discharge in the brain; epileptics don't get
    depressed; ergo subject someone suffering from depression to several
    electric discharges through their brain and, "hey presto", no more
    depression!

    Absolutely flawless logic wouldn't you say? What breathtaking insight
    into the wonders and workings of the human mind and body!

    I believe one day, EST will be seen in similar light to that which we
    now see lobotomy. In the meantime, if you want some pretty chilling
    reading, just do a google search on "electric shock treatment".

    Ted
     
  13. Dave VanHorn

    Dave VanHorn Guest

    I believe one day, EST will be seen in similar light to that which we
    You'll end up looking at a lot of material prepared by the "church" of
    scientology, designed to scare people away from conventional mental health.
    The "citizens committee on human rights" is one of their many front groups.

    The "church" of scientology regularly beats this horse, in their effort to
    paint all mental health care as barbaric. (except their own of course, where
    they excorcise the spirits of dead aliens from you at $450/hr)

    EST certainly has been mis-applied, but applied properly, it does work, and
    it does improve people's lives. Insulin therapy is similarly scary, but
    again, applied properly, it does work.
    http://www.xenu.net/archive/WIR/wir5-40.html
     
  14. Apparently it's very effective, though. The only downside is you can't
    remember who you are, where you live or what you've done in life.
    :)
     
  15. Andrew Crook

    Andrew Crook Guest

    I believe devices similar to pacemakers are available to counteract tremors
    caused by disorders such as Parkinson's Disease. I am sure similar devices
    have been used to treat types of epilepsy.

    Andi
     
  16. Jim Thompson

    Jim Thompson Guest

    [snip]

    See "electronic design", 10.27.03, page 56, figure 4.

    ...Jim Thompson
     
  17. Like many things (amputation, leeches, ...), EST has gotten refined over
    time. As I understand it, they've gotten better at determining how much
    shock to apply and where to apply it, so that the side effects are greatly
    reduced. AIUI, it remains an effective and medically indicated treatment in
    some cases of severe, acute depression (i.e., if your person is otherwise
    going to commit suicide before the drugs can kick in). It's certainly not
    used as a panacea any more.

    --walter
     
  18. Dave VanHorn

    Dave VanHorn Guest

    Hardly.
     
  19. Arch-lab

    Arch-lab Guest

    Don't have the actual magazine, is the article called "Medtronic Sets The Pace
    With Implantable Electronics " you are refering too?
     
  20. Arch-lab

    Arch-lab Guest

    Seems to me you were looking to build shock circuit before all this other talk
    took off.
    Do you still want to do that, or did someone get back to you?


     
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