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Electric Shock from 24 volts

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Suttiwit Sukpinit, Jun 9, 2015.

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  1. Suttiwit Sukpinit

    Suttiwit Sukpinit

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    Jun 9, 2015
    Hello all...
    I've connected 2 car batteries (12 volts each) in series to get 24 volts potential difference (NOT from a power supply)
    Then, I was working with the wires and both of them touched me at the same time (I let both wires touch me because I thought that I would start getting a shock at 40-60 volts (well, that was what many sources online said), however...)... then, I felt like someone pinched on me on the skin with their nails, or an ant biting me, or getting stung by a wasp. (The wire connected to + is on my hand, the wire connected to - is on my knee).

    ..."Really?" I said, I checked the voltage on the batteries connected in series and it was just 24 volts.
    24 volts and I got a shock... Despite sources saying 40-60 volts. That is really weird.

    I googled on the Internet about getting electrocuted by 24 volts, it said it was near impossible.
    I talked to chat rooms and they could all hardly believe me.

    So, since the shock was not quite painful, and I am curious and want to find out why I am the only one I know of who gets electrocuted by just 24 volts. I tried again and again: This time with my arm. The positive wire is connected to my index finger holding the wire and the negative wire to my arm, and i felt the same pain time after time. I even get some bumps from it.

    (It sounds very stupid, but what else can I do? I can't try to electrocute my pet, because I wont know what it feels)
    (Also, however: I can only feel the pain from the negative wire, not the positive)

    Being very curious, I hooked myself up to an analog ammeter and did measure at least 1 milliamp of current.
    At least 1 milliamp, time after time, again and again. (If I hold on tighter, increasing surface area, I get slightly more current through me). And according to the charts (you can google online): 1 milliamp is where you can start to feel something.
    However, I started to feel something when the current is as low as 500 microamps. DESPITE, the chart saying i would feel something at 1 mA (or the chart could be an estimate).

    Thus, when a voltage of 24 volts go through me, I get 1 milliamp of current going through me.
    Then, I calculated my own resistance with Ohm's law: 24 volts / 0.001 amps = 24000 ohms.
    If Ohm's law and my calculation is correct: I only have a resistance of 24000 (24 thousand) ohms from arm to hand.

    And that's not the end of it: My hands and arms and legs were not wet (they were completely dry), they were clean.I am in a room of 25 degrees centigrade. I was not sweating at all, not even at the point of electrical contact, and had a shower twice a day everyday.

    Please tell me what could have caused this? Am I "electrically sensitive"? I am mystified and wondering why I am the only one who can feel 24 volts DC.
     
  2. Anon_LG

    Anon_LG

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    Jun 24, 2014
    Do not test this on your pet, that will come under cruelty to animals.

    Was the negative terminal sharp? Do you have any medical conditions?
     
  3. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
  4. Colin Mitchell

    Colin Mitchell

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    Aug 31, 2014
    Do not touch any other electrical wires or you will instantly electrocuted.
    You are very susceptible to getting killed.
    Some people have high resistance skin and they don't feel the shock.
    Others die at the first touch.
    You have been warned.
     
  5. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

    3,422
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    May 12, 2015
    Don't do It!!!

    Although it probably wont hurt or injure most people, humans are all very different. What somebody can say is a tingle, can kill somebody else.
    Car batteries also carry several hundred amps too.
    If you are just curious and LIKE to tingle......Keep a stock of PP3's and stick your tongue across when you get the urge.
    (tongue firmly in my cheek).

    Better still, use your curious nature and apply it to a bread board project.
    Martin.
     
    Supercap2F likes this.
  6. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    Although he would never experience more that a few Ma, unless he has a lot of Copper in his system;)
    M.
     
  7. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

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    May 12, 2015
    Minder. Sometimes what we know or don't know is better off not said at all.
    We don't want to encourage behaviour like this! It does potentially pose real risks.
     
  8. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

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    May 12, 2015
    Love it...

    I am such a hypocrite...:cool:
     
  9. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    Never heard of someone being electrocuted with a Auto battery!!
    Probabally be first.

    Considering that the resistance between skin and the heart is in the order of 10's of megohms, the current is hardly measurable.;)

    Heart shock treatment starts at 5000v.
    M.
     
  10. garublador

    garublador

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    Oct 14, 2014
    Are you positive they aren't 24V batteries?
     
  11. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    well he wasn't electrocuted as he is here to write this story


    Dave
     
  12. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    Jun 25, 2014
    Give this a read : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_shock#Body_resistance

    These values are large contact patches with AC... not smaller DC contact like what you did, but still, the values are surprisingly low. You'll also notice that they don't give an 'average' for everyone, but 3 averages based on population % that fall under that group.

    Furthermore, if you insist on playing with electricity, please make sure you have a spotter who can hit you with a rubber mallet for intentionally experimenting with electricity through your body! There are safer ways to do this, and using car batteries is certainly not one of those methods.
    Oh, and fyi, I got my hand stuck to a wire during one of my electronics courses... I hooked up a 1V p-p function generator with an inductor in it. The frequency of the generator induced a high enough voltage in the circuit that it caused the muscles in my hand to contract preventing me from letting go. I simply stepped back and let my project slip off the table taking the wire out of my hands, but it was not a good experience. If something similar happens to you the result could be fatal. You should never underestimate electricity, and if you can't guarantee you know exactly what you are touching and guarantee what the effect will be, don't do it.

    Oh... additionally, as a kid, I used to take apart disposable cameras. Have you ever been shocked by a capacitor? There was only one AA battery in there, how bad can it be? Tingling and numbness was one symptom, as was sweating and sore muscles. Again, don't underestimate this stuff.

    @davenn , I would very much like to see this thread locked. Other than pointing out the obvious dangers, I don't thing any further talking about the subject could do any good.
     
  13. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    I am new to this forum but my opinion it is far better to provide education than close every subject up and say don't go there, particularly as this voltage is well below the N.A. standard considered Low Voltage Rating, and exempt largely from safety regulations.
    M..
     
  14. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

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    May 12, 2015
    Read my post after
    Martaine2005 said:
    Minder. Sometimes what we know or don't know is better off not said at all.
    We don't want to encourage behaviour like this! It does potentially pose real risks.
    Never heard of someone being electrocuted with a Auto battery!!
    Probabally be first.

    Considering that the resistance between skin and the heart is in the order of 10's of megohms, the current is hardly measurable.;)

    Heart shock treatment starts at 5000v.
    M.

    That was a complete mess....Obviously messed up there..
     
    davenn likes this.
  15. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    Jun 25, 2014
    Certainly understood, but aside from what has been posted already, are you aware of any other tips or advice you could provide the OP? The answer to the op's question has already been answered about if he is the only one to feel 24V. My concern is that further posts will be made recommending safe ways to do so, and while this is certainly true, being able to accurately share this information should be done in person by personnel whom are adequately educated to do so in a manner to prevent others from misunderstanding the material and causing harm.

    I also agree that this is the internet, if they don't find it here, they can find it somewhere else. If this is the case, I feel much better being on a forum that discourages risky experiments.
    I've seen many automotive modification questions shot down, and one of the major reasons is that the knowledge required to carry out something safety is far from the knowledge we can directly share in text online, in addition this knowledge would have already been enough to solve their problem.

    While someone experienced would know the right way to handle something that was not described in a step-by-step, someone who is green may not be aware of the risks involved with something that is not covered in great detail because it may not have been expected. (Perfect example is my childhood experience with a camera flash... after all it was only powered by a AA battery)

    I certainly hope the op is willing to learn, but would very much like to see anyone starting with theory or supervised experiments. If the OP was local, I would be willing to visit, but I am not comfortable in my ability, or anyone else's in sharing the required knowledge in a forum with a few posts. Perhaps if the op is still curious, a new thread can be started... something along the lines of "how do Electric Muscle Simulators work" or, "What kind of safe practices can I follow while working with 24V"

    This thread was a story, followed by a question if anyone else gets shocked with 24V.. answered
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2015
    Martaine2005 likes this.
  16. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    that's because you didn't get electrocuted .... read my last post


    Dave
     
    Martaine2005 likes this.
  17. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009

    I agree

    OP if your would like to start a better questioned thread please do
    I will close this one
    NOTE my last post :)

    Dave
     
  18. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    You can notice the same thing with a 9 volt battery. If you tap it against your tongue you will feel ot (obviously) but you can also feel a sensation if you press it against your skin in a sensitive place (try your chin or cheek)

    24V is certainly enough to feel, and some people feel it more than others. Sweaty skin, sharp electrodes, and he nature of your skin all affect it.
     
    Anon_LG likes this.
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