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Electret Microphone Help

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by _Nate_, Jan 28, 2018.

  1. _Nate_

    _Nate_

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    Jun 12, 2017
    Hello internet! I have had a bunch of electret microphones gathering dust in my bins and have wanted to use them for a while. The problem is, nothing I've tried has worked. I've found dozens of wonky tutorials online that never work. My question is:

    How do I wire up an electret microphone into a speaker?

    I do not own any 2.2k ohm resistors and won't be able to get any anytime soon, so a method without that would be great.
    I am also looking for a simpler circuit so I can fit this in a compact area.
    Thanks!


    PS.
    If you're super baller, if anyone has a method where I can take the input of the microphone and wirelessly transmit the audio data, that would be great.
     
  2. ramussons

    ramussons

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    Jun 10, 2014
    An Amplifier is needed for the microphone to drive the speakers. Have you used one?
    Can you give a schematic of what you did?

    Google for "simple FM transmitters" and you will be flooded with schematics.
     
  3. _Nate_

    _Nate_

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    Jun 12, 2017
    The circuit I used involved a potentiometer, a 100uF capacitor, the microphone, and a simple dc speaker.
     
  4. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    That never will work with *any* normal microphone, especially electrets. An electret cartridge requires a cmall amount of DC for its operation. The signal output is a few millivolts (more if you yell), and cannot drive a voice-coil speaker directly. There are many low-cost amplifier modules on ebay.

    Wirelessly transmit the audio, or convert the audio to digital data and trans mit that?

    Transmit to what?

    ak
     
  5. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    An electret needs a gain of about 200 before you get a signal strong enough to use as the input to an audio power amp. That circuit is called a microphone preamplifier.

    Bob
     
  6. _Nate_

    _Nate_

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    Jun 12, 2017
    So I have your average $1 arduino transmitter and receiver, which standalone are pretty small, and I wanted to know if I simply plug connect the output of the mic, transmit the data to the receiver, and connect the transmitted data into the amplifier and speaker.
     
  7. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    What is an "Arduino transmitter and receiver"
     
  8. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    With no part numbers, photos, links to product pages, or wiring diagrams, gee, what do you think?

    ak

    ps. AGAIN, Microphones do not produce data.
     
  9. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    If you are talking about the inexpensive 433MHz transmitters and receivers you can buy on Ebay, the answer is definitely not. Those modules transmit a bitstream of serial data, not an analog signal.

    Bob
     
  10. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Jun 21, 2012
    Wow! And what did that circuit actually DO for you? Can you post a schematic diagram of the circuit?
    Not too surprising, given the troll-like nature of your responses to our questions here. Plus, you have not yet uploaded any schematics or photographs... or anything that would help any of us answer the bold, highlighted, question of your initial post on this thread:
    I am going to have to assume you have zero technical skills and no electronics instrumentation of any kind. You may or may not have a soldering iron and flux-cored solder of appropriate size to "wire up" anything. So, please correct these deficiencies before proceeding.

    You will need an audio amplifier with a high-impedance input and sufficient output capability to amplify the electret microphone audio output to a useful level. An oscilloscope will prove invaluable in determining that this is actually happening. Some electret microphones have a "built in" FET (Field-Effect Transistor) buffer that requires a small external DC voltage to operate. If possible, select one of these from your dusty bins as they are considerably easier to work with than a bare two-terminal electret microphone.

    does not exist AFAIK. Speakers are alternating current (AC) devices that accept audio frequency signals and mechanically produce audible alternating rarification and compression waves in air, otherwise known as sound waves. The frequency response of speakers extends from kilohertz signals down to a few hertz, although the human ear does not hear much below 20 Hz or much above 20 kHz. The lower frequencies can, however, be felt in the human chest cavity and perhaps resonate there if sufficient power is available to produce them in air. Speakers used for audible purposes are NEVER operated with DC. Linear actuators, not speakers, are capable of operating with DC but their implementation and use is not simple and generally never used in conjunction with electret microphones. YM(or kilometers)MV.

    If you want to separate the speaker from the audio amplifier and insert a wireless (radio) connection, there is no simple solution. You need a radio transmitter that accepts the output of the audio amplifier and a radio receiver that accepts the radio transmission and converts it to an audio signal of sufficient power to operate a speaker. Refer to texts on radio broadcasting to see how this works.

    The key is modulation, of which there are dozens if not hundreds of varieties, including digital variations suitable for use with Arduino microcontrollers. So-called "Arduino transmitters and receivers" accept digital (on/off) input signals and produce digital (on/off) output signals. It is your responsibility to convert the continuously variable analog audio signal from your electret microphone into a digital signal for application as input to the transmitter. It is your responsibility to convert the digital output of the receiver into an audio signal for application to a speaker.

    If you don't feel up for all that, you can use an unlicensed "wireless microphone" radio transmitter with an appropriate receiver. These are readily available on Ebay in either AM or FM varieties. There is also information available on the Internet for DIY construction. Google "diy wireless audio transmitter and receiver" for ideas and possible solutions.
     
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