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Duracell wireless charger, how does it work?

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by mike, May 15, 2013.

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  1. mike

    mike Guest

    I picked up a Duracell wireless charger at a garage sale.
    Model CP-PPS.
    Also known as MyGrid.
    Jentec AH 1815-B
    Rated 15V at 1A.

    It's NOT inductive.
    Has alternating metal stripes that supply power to contacts
    on the device adapter.

    I have the adapter for the ipad, but no ipad.

    Thought I'd reverse engineer it to see if I could do anything
    useful.

    It puts out a square wave from 1V to 3V with a period of about
    2milliseconds with a source impedance around 10K.

    If you put a resistive load on it, it just drags down the square
    wave.

    If you put a diode in series with a load of less than 10K,
    It powers up and puts out 15V with a narrow periodic sense pulse to
    near ground.

    So far, so good.

    Problem is that most devices need 5V. Not sure why they used
    15V.

    I was gonna put a zener in series and charge my PDA, until I did
    the math and decided I'd need to dissipate 10Watts.

    The ipad adapter doesn't look like it has any place big enough for
    a switching regulator. I really don't want to tear it apart to
    see.

    Anybody got insight into how this thing works?

    Thanks, mike
     
  2. mike

    mike Guest

    You need to explain that to the marketing department.

    I still need to figger out if there's some magic way to
    get the voltage down to 5V or so.
     
  3. Edward Lee

    Edward Lee Guest

    Such phone, by definition, would be "smart". In another word, WiFi
    phone with VOIP. One of my Android phone is not activated, but for
    WiFi access only. All i need is a OOMA like VOIP gateway, then i can
    drop my activated phone.
    I bet your kids and grand-kids are paying mobile phone bills per
    month, what you are paying land-line per year. Such progress
    intelligently planned (from phone company commercial).
     
  4. mike

    mike Guest

    If you're willing to drop it in a slot, just wire up some contacts
    and build a slot.

    Ordinary wireless phone will do what you want except for the cell part.
    I'm in the process of dumping Frontier and using CLEAR for internet.
    Bought an obi box that gives me free google voice phone.

    I'd still like to make this charger work for my pda.
    I can easily fit in the contacts etc, but not much space inside
    if I have to add a switcher to get the 15V down to 5V for charging.
     
  5. amdx

    amdx Guest

    Note to accounting,
    Increase the wine account by the amount saved on phone expenditures.

    Mikek :)
     
  6. Robert Macy

    Robert Macy Guest

    does it have to be open? or, can it just be laid down inside/on a
    tray? does that work with it still folded, or whatever phones do
    today?

    by the way, piece of cake to do the wireless charging, just need a
    manufacturer open to add to their product line. Did you ask Samsung?
    They're pretty avant garde in their approaches. I've worked with them
    before and would like to again.
     
  7. I love my DECT bluetooth link. Works great, but my old razr is power
    hungry with the BT radio on.

    Cheers
     
  8. Robert Macy

    Robert Macy Guest

    Bluetooth is built in; the original manufacturer should have built in
    wireless charge, too! Since you're not holding the cell phone; there
    should be no problem adding something to the phone, right? As I said,
    piece of cake to do.
     
  9. amdx

    amdx Guest

    I'm with you Jim, I don't want to surf on a small phone screen.
    But the world is going to mobile and away from desktops and laptops.
    Computer sales are sliding,
    "world-wide shipments of laptops and desktops fell 14% in the first
    quarter from a year earlier. That is the sharpest drop since IDC began
    tracking this data in 1994 and marks the fourth straight quarter of
    declines."
    From:
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324695104578414973888155516.html

    Here's an interesting graph, although ends it in 2011.
    Shows amazing growth in iPhone, Android and iPad in a few short years. Mikek
     
  10. Robert Macy

    Robert Macy Guest

    Interesting note, for a wireless power transfer you'll see the easiest
    way to 'shut off' the spigot of power coming in is to simply short out
    the coil destroying its resonance, DO NOT open the coil up like you do
    when attached to a voltage supply.

    If you're serious about making up a wireless chargning system for your
    phone; contact me offline.
     
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